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Darkling Beetles or Mealworms

darkling beetle mealworm

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5 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Reevak - Posted January 9 2017 - 6:25 PM

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I was just wondering why people use mealworms to feed their pets (ants in this case) instead of darkling beetles. I always assumed it was because mealworms provide more nutrition, but I don't actually know for sure. Is there a reason that people use mealworms instead of the darkling beetles that you think not many people know about or is it just as straightforward as I originally thought? Thanks.


Edited by Reevak, January 9 2017 - 6:25 PM.


#2 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted January 9 2017 - 6:28 PM

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Because the adult beetles are stronger and harder to eat for ants.


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#3 Offline Serafine - Posted January 9 2017 - 6:40 PM

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The beetles have a very hard exoskeleton which is hard to rip apart for ants that do not have workers specialized in breaking stuff up (=majors).
Also in case they're served living there is a high risk that ants are severely injured or even killed when fighting with the beetle, much less with the worm.

We should respect all forms of consciousness. The body is just a vessel, a mere hull.

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#4 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted January 9 2017 - 7:36 PM

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Adult Tenebrio also have chemical defenses, although I honestly don't know if they are effective against ants (they might simply make the beetle unappealing to predators). Sometimes I will chop up deceased adults (or adults which fail to eclose properly) and leave the parts in a dish.


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If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

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#5 Offline LC3 - Posted January 9 2017 - 8:00 PM

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Not to mention the larval stage contains the most and highest amount of nutrition and juicy bits. They are larvae after all which have one goal; to eat as much as possible in order to become a pupae. Which will in the end become a beetle. As you can guess it uses most of the energy and nutrients it accumulated as a larvae to become a beetle and as a result leaves the beetle with much less meat then the larvae.


Edited by LC3, January 9 2017 - 8:01 PM.


#6 Offline Alabama Anter - Posted January 9 2017 - 8:39 PM

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Adult Tenebrio also have chemical defenses, although I honestly don't know if they are effective against ants (they might simply make the beetle unappealing to predators). Sometimes I will chop up deceased adults (or adults which fail to eclose properly) and leave the parts in a dish.

Yes. If you harass one and smell it smells horrible.
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