Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  

Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo

L.Niger test tube is too wet

test tube lasius niger question condensation

  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Mr.Fish - Posted June 9 2024 - 7:35 AM

Mr.Fish

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • LocationNorth Italy

Hi all!

I've been keeping this (my first) colony of L.Niger for basically 10 months now. Recently I made them a new test tube as the previous one's cotton was starting to get dark and moldy.

I sadly decided to force them into their new home after basically a week of waiting and everything was looking nice and perfect for a while after that. And, in my enthusiasm, I failed to notice all the condensation that formed on the "deepest" section of my test tube.

2ok.jpg  1ok.jpg  3ok.jpg

 

Last week I had to go on a little trip so I fed my colony abundantly and I left home on the 3rd.
Yesterday I finally got home and a terrifying sight was awaiting me.

4notok.jpg  5notok.jpg  6notok.jpg

 

 

As you all can see there is now a lot of water on the second portion of the tube, the brood is all scattered, the queen retreated to the dryer section of the nest, some pupae seem to be definitely too wet and it seems like one portion of the extremely wet cotton is covered in ant excrement. I'm afraid some of the pupare are already rotting.

 

What should I do now? I'm afraid relocating the colony again this quickly could cause too much stress and kill the queen but it's also clear that if left in there the entire colony won't last long.

Thank you all in advance for your attention and sorry again for the quality of my pictures and my lack of experience.



#2 Offline IdioticMouse26 - Posted June 9 2024 - 9:48 AM

IdioticMouse26

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 42 posts
  • LocationBC, Canada

I think the only way would be relocate your ants. The risk of them dying of stress here is bigger than dying of stress because of moving. Also, the rotting brood will cause mold infections. Definetly move them as fast as you can and I'm sure they'll move quickly because of the condition in their nest and when they move, try to keep them in the calmest enviroment you could find. 


  • rptraut likes this

#3 Offline Mr.Fish - Posted June 9 2024 - 10:32 AM

Mr.Fish

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • LocationNorth Italy

I'll do that as soon as I can.

Quick (and probably dumb) question though: how much of the cotton should actually be behind the water line when making a new test tube?


  • rptraut likes this

#4 Offline IdioticMouse26 - Posted June 9 2024 - 3:21 PM

IdioticMouse26

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 42 posts
  • LocationBC, Canada

I would suggest you do a decent amount, as ants are prone to digging into cottons. Also, when I set up a testube setup, I push in the cotton until the water line is just below the face of the cotton. Don't drench the whole thing too much when your first putting them in, water will seep in later and this helps prevent future leaks. 

When your moving them, to give them the least amount of stress, put two testubes(one with the ants in and one that's empty) in a containor of choice, place them, unplug the testubes and put the containor somewhere dark. This will be the most stress-free method as it does not force the ants to move but can do so by their own choice. The downside is that they might not move at all or take a long time. If it takes too long, you can always shine lights on the testube with ants and keep the other one dark. If the leaking situation gets critical and they don't move, you'll have to do forced allocation by dumping the ants out. Ants will try to find cover as soon as they can when their colony is exposed so they'll move in to any testube they see.

 

Helpful video about testube setups: 

 

Feel free to ask more questions!


  • rptraut and Mr.Fish like this





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: test tube, lasius niger, question, condensation

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users