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New termite colony


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14 replies to this topic

#1 Offline TheAntKid - Posted February 21 2024 - 11:30 AM

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I found a termite colony inside a log with a colony of camponotus snellingi.

Currently keeping:

2x Camponotus pennsylvanicus

1x Camponotus nearctius 

1x Lasius sp.

1x Unknown ant species (may not have a queen).
Past colonies:

Formica subsericea

Camponotus nearctius

Camponotus sp.

Lasius Claviger (only a couple days)


#2 Offline Artisan_Ants - Posted February 21 2024 - 12:13 PM

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I found a termite colony inside a log with a colony of camponotus snellingi.

Nice. If you can locate the queen and king, then you’re good. But if you can’t then there’s really no hope for them. And from what I found, termites are fairly challenging to keep.

Keeping:

3x - S. molesta 

1x - C. chromaiodes

2x - F. pallidefulva

2x - C. cerasi

1x - B. depilis

2x P. imparis (colonies) 3x P. imparis queens (1x queen in test tube, 3x queens in test tube, and 6x queens in another test tube. Can't wait to see the results!)

 

Check out my C. chromaiodes journal here: https://www.formicul...aiodes-journal/


#3 Offline michiganantsinmyyard - Posted February 21 2024 - 3:58 PM

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I found a termite colony inside a log with a colony of camponotus snellingi.

Nice. If you can locate the queen and king, then you’re good. But if you can’t then there’s really no hope for them. And from what I found, termites are fairly challenging to keep.

 

Not necessarily, they can have neotenics and produce new reproductives if needed, depending on the species. If the colony is of sufficient size, they can create secondary reproductives.


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#4 Offline TheAntKid - Posted February 22 2024 - 4:43 AM

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I researched termites in my area and they might be eastern subterranean termites or imported Formosan subterranean termites.


Currently keeping:

2x Camponotus pennsylvanicus

1x Camponotus nearctius 

1x Lasius sp.

1x Unknown ant species (may not have a queen).
Past colonies:

Formica subsericea

Camponotus nearctius

Camponotus sp.

Lasius Claviger (only a couple days)


#5 Offline Artisan_Ants - Posted February 22 2024 - 4:45 AM

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I found a termite colony inside a log with a colony of camponotus snellingi.

Nice. If you can locate the queen and king, then you’re good. But if you can’t then there’s really no hope for them. And from what I found, termites are fairly challenging to keep.
Not necessarily, they can have neotenics and produce new reproductives if needed, depending on the species. If the colony is of sufficient size, they can create secondary reproductives.
Oh wow, that’s pretty cool. Yeah, I don’t really know a lot about termites (just learned about them from videos really). If I know about any kind of termite, then it’s Macrotermes.
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Keeping:

3x - S. molesta 

1x - C. chromaiodes

2x - F. pallidefulva

2x - C. cerasi

1x - B. depilis

2x P. imparis (colonies) 3x P. imparis queens (1x queen in test tube, 3x queens in test tube, and 6x queens in another test tube. Can't wait to see the results!)

 

Check out my C. chromaiodes journal here: https://www.formicul...aiodes-journal/


#6 Offline michiganantsinmyyard - Posted February 22 2024 - 8:08 AM

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Termites are an amazing food source for any ants. It would definitely benefit your ants if you were to raise these.

#7 Offline TheAntKid - Posted February 22 2024 - 3:56 PM

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I actually already fed one to my new brachyponera colony.


Currently keeping:

2x Camponotus pennsylvanicus

1x Camponotus nearctius 

1x Lasius sp.

1x Unknown ant species (may not have a queen).
Past colonies:

Formica subsericea

Camponotus nearctius

Camponotus sp.

Lasius Claviger (only a couple days)


#8 Offline TheAntKid - Posted February 22 2024 - 5:37 PM

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I put the termites into a test tube with damp tissue and soil. I'll check up on them in 3 days or so.


Currently keeping:

2x Camponotus pennsylvanicus

1x Camponotus nearctius 

1x Lasius sp.

1x Unknown ant species (may not have a queen).
Past colonies:

Formica subsericea

Camponotus nearctius

Camponotus sp.

Lasius Claviger (only a couple days)


#9 Offline AsdinAnts - Posted February 22 2024 - 7:16 PM

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test tubes are like the worst setups for termites, seeing as the cotton doesn’t let out as much methane as termites produce.

Currently keeping •
-A. occidentalis 

-B. patagonicus

 


#10 Offline TheAntKid - Posted February 23 2024 - 4:46 AM

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But I've seen that some people leave the lids on their termite setups for weeks to months, like in jar setups.


Currently keeping:

2x Camponotus pennsylvanicus

1x Camponotus nearctius 

1x Lasius sp.

1x Unknown ant species (may not have a queen).
Past colonies:

Formica subsericea

Camponotus nearctius

Camponotus sp.

Lasius Claviger (only a couple days)


#11 Offline AsdinAnts - Posted February 23 2024 - 5:25 PM

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Jar setups are much more larger than test tubes

Currently keeping •
-A. occidentalis 

-B. patagonicus

 


#12 Offline ANTS_KL - Posted February 23 2024 - 9:22 PM

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test tubes are like the worst setups for termites, seeing as the cotton doesn’t let out as much methane as termites produce.


My colony of Coptotermes curvignathus currently living in a test tube would like to say otherwise :)
Young ant keeper with a decent amount of knowledge on local ant species.

YouTube: https://m.youtube.co...uKsahGliSH7EqOQ (It's pretty dead. Might upload again soon, don't expect my voice to sound the same though.)

Currently kept ant species, favorites have a star in front of their names (NOT in alphabetical order, also may be outdated sometimes): Camponotus irritans inferior, Ooceraea biroi, Pheidole parva, Nylanderia sp., Paraparatrechina tapinomoides, Platythyrea sp., Anochetus sp., Colobopsis sp. (cylindrica group), Crematogaster ferrarii, Polyrhachis (Myrma) cf. pruinosa, Polyrhachis (Cyrtomyrma) laevissima, Tapinoma sp. (formerly Zatapinoma)

Death count: Probably over a hundred individual queens and colonies by now. I cannot recall whatsoever.

#13 Offline Nare - Posted February 25 2024 - 2:32 PM

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I would use petri dishes and test tubes solely for founding. This year, I've had very good results with petri dishes for Zootermopsis nevadensis. The ones I have in test tubes weren't/aren't nearly as successful (granted there are other factors at play in all likelihood including wood type/amount). On the other hand I've successfully founded probably a dozen Reticulitermes flavipes pairs in small test tubes. I think the main consideration with the test tube is volume. For small species they're fine, but I would probably be more skeptical about them for larger species like Zoot (that being said there are plenty of cases of them doing fine in TTs - this is all anecdotal).

 

I would avoid test tubes for founding from colony fragments - primarily because I've found it difficult to fit enough termites to found a colony in a test tube. I've had some success founding Reticulitermes colony fragments in petri dishes, but even then they need to be moved after just a few months due to crowding/eating most of the wood. If you're serious about founding from a colony fragment, I would suggest getting at least a hundred workers and starting in a petri dish at minimum. Use wood (white rot, cubic brown rot, whatever), and maybe a little bit of soil or tissue paper for moisture management. Your best bet is a "small" container (think sandwich container size).

 

Long term I believe the paradigm with wood-dwelling termites in captivity might be keeping a large (several litre) "source bin" with wood and soil (as appropriate for the species), and regularly extracting colony fragments for display setups (petri dishes or similar things). Anecdotally these small setups don't take off like the big ones do, but it's hard to view termites in the large setups - so in my mind this is the best compromise.

So TLDR: from my experience, TTs may be appropriate for founding pairs. Petri dishes are probably better for founding pairs and can be good for founding colony fragments for small species. Long term you're looking at larger containers with less visibility.

 

Hope that helps.


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#14 Offline TheAntKid - Posted February 26 2024 - 3:11 AM

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I moved them back into the petri dish 3 days ago.


Currently keeping:

2x Camponotus pennsylvanicus

1x Camponotus nearctius 

1x Lasius sp.

1x Unknown ant species (may not have a queen).
Past colonies:

Formica subsericea

Camponotus nearctius

Camponotus sp.

Lasius Claviger (only a couple days)


#15 Offline TheAntKid - Posted March 10 2024 - 2:01 AM

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They died from being moved. However, I found part of a possibly whole colony in a stick behind my house. I caught about 30+ workers and soldiers, with about 15-20 ergatoid queens. They are in a petri dish setup and are doing well.


Currently keeping:

2x Camponotus pennsylvanicus

1x Camponotus nearctius 

1x Lasius sp.

1x Unknown ant species (may not have a queen).
Past colonies:

Formica subsericea

Camponotus nearctius

Camponotus sp.

Lasius Claviger (only a couple days)





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