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What is this big ant?


Best Answer Manitobant , June 22 2022 - 10:09 PM

Those are camponotus queens. Go to the full post


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Whatisthisant - Posted June 21 2022 - 11:14 PM

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Hello. These ants were caught very gently today in Portland, Oregon. Caught in the window screen, they basically walked into the test tubes. 

 

From mandible to end of gaster they measure 15mm (Is this normal?? Largest ants I've ever seen in my life). They also have really long legs so I thought they were wasps until I noticed they were horrible flyers. Appreciate any advice. 

 

EDIT:

Catch date: June 22

Habitat: Suburbs with lots of forest

Length: I used a ruler. 15mm is accurate

Color: Black

Characteristic: Big

Attached Files


Edited by Whatisthisant, June 21 2022 - 11:19 PM.

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#2 Offline ColAnt735 - Posted June 22 2022 - 5:20 AM

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Camponotus males.


  • NickAnter, lazyant, FloridaAnts and 1 other like this

Keeping ants since 2020 

I keep:

Myrmicinae: Solenopsis molesta( 2 queens). Tetramorium immigrans ( 3 colonies with the biggest nearing 800 workers!),

Crematogaster cerasi  :yahoo:  ( 1 colony with a worker). Temnothorax  curvispinosus ( 1 queen with colony of 2 workers).

Formicinae: Prenolepis imparis ( 2 single queen colonies). Lasius brevicornis  :yahoo:( 19 founding queens) haven't seen many journals of them. Lasius Neoniger (a founding queen).Formica incerta( 1 colony with 22 workers)

 

Previously kept: Pogonomyrmex occidentalis   ( 1 colony with 9 workers). 

 

As you can tell I like ants


#3 Offline Whatisthisant - Posted June 22 2022 - 10:07 PM

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Thank you so much for the ID. Your info was so valuable. 
 
Based on what you told me, I looked at an old log today after work and actually found a log with an ant on it within a minute of looking. I guess it was enjoying some fresh air? It was pure dumb luck there were 2 more ants hiding in the same piece of wood. Much smarter than the males I found yesterday. 
 
Can you ID these ants as well please? They look to be ~17mm.

Attached Files



#4 Offline Manitobant - Posted June 22 2022 - 10:09 PM   Best Answer

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Those are camponotus queens.
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#5 Offline Kristijan - Posted June 23 2022 - 1:25 AM

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Where are you from?



#6 Offline futurebird - Posted June 23 2022 - 3:50 AM

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they said Portland, Oregon


Starting this July I'm posting videos of my ants every week on youTube.

I like to make relaxing videos that capture the joy of watching ants.

If that sounds like your kind of thing... follow me >here<


#7 Offline Whatisthisant - Posted June 23 2022 - 8:44 PM

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Thanks ColAnt and Manitobant. I will mark solved. 

 

Kristijan I am from Oregon, US. 

 

I would really appreciate if someone could possibly ID the scientific name, but you guys were fast and accurate with your answers. Thank you again. 



#8 Offline NickAnter - Posted June 23 2022 - 9:25 PM

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We'll need better pictures to get down to species.


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Species being kept:

 

 Solenopsis "plebeius", Camponotus vicinus, Camponotus maritimus, Formica cf. subaenescens, Formica cf. aerata, Lasius cf. americanus, Lasius aphidicola, Lasius brevicornis, Lasius nr claviger, Nylanderia vividula, Temnothorax rudis and a Hypoponera sp.

 

Hoping to find this year:

Myrmecocystus, Liometopum occidentale, Camponotus essigi, Camponotus fragilis, Manica bradleyi, Formica perpilosa, Pheidole hyatti, and a Parasitic Formica sp.

 

People are stupid. It explains a lot...


#9 Offline Whatisthisant - Posted June 23 2022 - 10:25 PM

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I understand. I will check back in 6 weeks with better pictures then! Thanks for letting me know. 



#10 Offline TacticalHandleGaming - Posted June 23 2022 - 10:46 PM

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Likely Camponotus modoc or novaeboracensis. They are very common here, and have been flying recently.


Edited by TacticalHandleGaming, June 23 2022 - 10:47 PM.

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Currently kept species

L. neoniger, P. occidentalis, C. modoc, C. novaeboracensis, T. immigrans, B. depilis, A. occidentalis, P. imparis

 

Previously kept species

T. rugatulus

 

Looking for

Myrmecocystus kennedyi, Myrmecocystus pyramicus, Myrmecocystus semirufus, Myrmecocystus testaceus

Pheidole californica, Pheidole creightoni, Pheidole inquilina, Solenopsis molesta, Crematogaster coarctata, Crematogaster mutans

My youtube channel. 





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