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Should small colonies skip diapause?


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Offline alwayslearning - Posted November 9 2021 - 3:58 PM

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I have read that sometimes people skip the first year of diapause for their colonies, particularly, when the colony has less than 10 workers.

What do you think about this? Is something to do? Does it have any benefit?

And if so, would you skip fridge and keep them with heat (as regular) or just at room temp?

 

I couldn't find a lot about this and I'll appreciate your experience.

 



#2 Offline ANTdrew - Posted November 9 2021 - 4:01 PM

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This is very dependent on species. I don’t skip diapause for any size colonies.
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"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25  

Keep ordinary ants in extraordinary ways.


#3 Offline alwayslearning - Posted November 9 2021 - 4:03 PM

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This is very dependent on species. I don’t skip diapause for any size colonies. 

 

 

Thanks as always, Papa Smurf! Your advice is much appreciated. Have a great one :D


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#4 Offline PurdueEntomology - Posted November 9 2021 - 4:17 PM

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Here is a read :  https://www.intechop.../chapters/60505


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#5 Offline alwayslearning - Posted November 9 2021 - 4:46 PM

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Wow! Pretty neat! Thanks a lot for sharing! I will read it tonight! 



#6 Offline Chickalo - Posted November 10 2021 - 5:18 AM

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Often ants under the subfamily Myrmicinae can skip and be fine (could be wrong there), whereas other subfamilies don't do as well (namely Formicinae).  You can skip for some species (i.e.  Tetramorium immigrans, some Myrmica, etc), but if the species can it's really just opinion there.  Personally, unless I think they should, I won't but them into diapause.  For instance since my T. immigrans are doing so well this year I'll probably just end up power feeding them through winter.  However, if the colony you chose to keep out shows signs of wanting to go into hibernation, don't make them skip (usual signs are reduced feeding, eating larvae, etc).


Edited by Chickalo, November 10 2021 - 8:35 AM.

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How's your day?  :)


#7 Offline Kaelwizard - Posted November 10 2021 - 7:00 AM

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Often ants under the subfamily Myrmicinae can skip and be fine (could be wrong there), whereas other genera don't do as well (namely Formicinae).  You can skip for some species (i.e.  Tetramorium immigrans, some Myrmica, etc), but if the species can it's really just opinion there.  Personally, unless I think they should, I won't but them into diapause.  For instance since my T. immigrans are doing so well this year I'll probably just end up power feeding them through winter.  However, if the colony you chose to keep out shows signs of wanting to go into hibernation, don't make them skip (usual signs are reduced feeding, eating larvae, etc).

*Subfamilies. I only ever hear about people skipping diapause with Myrmicinae, so you might be right.


Edited by Kaelwizard, November 10 2021 - 6:29 PM.

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#8 Offline Manitobant - Posted November 10 2021 - 8:44 AM

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In my experience, small colonies are actually the ones that benefit most from diapause. Its usually the larger ones that are able to skip it.
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#9 Offline PurdueEntomology - Posted November 10 2021 - 4:48 PM

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If you are keeping ants endemic to temperate regions wherein they experience seasonal diapause then wise husbandry would dictate subjecting them to artificial conditions that replicate diapause.  These insects are 'hard wired' through millions of years of evolution to go through these annual events, disrupting them is not wise nor is it responsible husbandry.


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#10 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted November 10 2021 - 5:17 PM

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If you are keeping ants endemic to temperate regions wherein they experience seasonal diapause then wise husbandry would dictate subjecting them to artificial conditions that replicate diapause.  These insects are 'hard wired' through millions of years of evolution to go through these annual events, disrupting them is not wise nor is it responsible husbandry.

While I agree with Purdue on this, I will point out that some species (especially in the Southeast and Southwest) can skip diapause every now and again without adverse affects or even go without it entirely. A good example that many people even from the more Northern states are familiar with is Pheidole bicarinata and Pheidole pilifera. Some species are just wired differently. It honestly depends on species.






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