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Bee Queen?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Offline That_one_ant_guy - Posted October 26 2021 - 3:16 PM

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Helllooo so my friend game me a bee saying it was a queen, so I just wanted to clarify if it was or not, and if so what species?Attached File  20211026_160246.jpg   297.44KB   0 downloadsAttached File  20211026_160249.jpg   294.79KB   0 downloadsAttached File  20211026_160255.jpg   237.39KB   0 downloads Thank youuuuuu
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#2 Offline gcsnelling - Posted October 26 2021 - 3:26 PM

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Apis mellifera and near as I can tell no.


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#3 Offline Manitobant - Posted October 26 2021 - 5:29 PM

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Its definitely not a queen.

#4 Offline That_one_ant_guy - Posted October 26 2021 - 6:26 PM

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I've been lied tooooOoOoOo😭😭😭

#5 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted October 26 2021 - 6:35 PM

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A. mellifera queens don't go on nuptial flights the same way ants do. The only time they leave their colony is to mate with several drones shortly after the parent colony splits and finds a new nest location. 



#6 Offline That_one_ant_guy - Posted October 26 2021 - 6:59 PM

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A. mellifera queens don't go on nuptial flights the same way ants do. The only time they leave their colony is to mate with several drones shortly after the parent colony splits and finds a new nest location.

I probably should have done some research
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#7 Offline FSTP - Posted October 27 2021 - 2:29 AM

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A. mellifera queens don't go on nuptial flights the same way ants do. The only time they leave their colony is to mate with several drones shortly after the parent colony splits and finds a new nest location.

I probably should have done some research

 

 

 

That's always a good policy. 


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#8 Offline Manitobant - Posted October 27 2021 - 6:42 AM

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A. mellifera queens don't go on nuptial flights the same way ants do. The only time they leave their colony is to mate with several drones shortly after the parent colony splits and finds a new nest location.

I probably should have done some research
while apis queens don’t go on nuptial flights and found on their own, bumblebee (bombus) queens do.

#9 Offline ANTS_KL - Posted October 27 2021 - 6:22 PM

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Also queen bees are larger than normal and their abdomens are at least twice the length of the wings in Apis. Bombus queens are just like giant workers from what I know


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Ants epic :D
YouTube: https://m.youtube.co...uKsahGliSH7EqOQ

My current ants: Nylanderia cf. kraepelini, Pheidole parva, Odontomachus simillimus, Tetramorium sp., Oecophylla smaragdina, Monomorium floricola, Pseudolasius streesemani, Camponotus parius, Iridomyrmex anceps, Solenopsis geminata, Pheidole cf. comata

 

Death count: idk there's too many that I've lost :(





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