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It's not the royal jelly (?!)... p-coumaric acid's effects on honey bees


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#1 Offline OhNoNotAgain - Posted January 9 2021 - 1:40 PM

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I had not heard this before. It appears that plant compounds that honey bees consume may have an inhibitory effect on their reproductive abilities.

 

p-coumaric acid is a component in pollen and honey that may inhibit honey bee reproductive development.  :o

Queen honey bees are never actually fed pollen and honey directly, ingesting ONLY royal jelly. Royal jelly was previously credited with containing the components needed to turn a larva into a queen, but it appears that isn't quite the whole story, or even the real story.

 

https://www.wired.co...-bee-queen-bee/

 

This also makes me kind of wonder if honey has any effects on ANTS? Presumably not, because people use it all the time without colony failure and it sounds like not even bumble bees make royal jelly.

But still.... ?!??!


  • Swirlysnowflake, Devi and Antkeeper01 like this

Formiculture Journals::

Veromessor pergandei, andrei; Novomessor cockerelli

Camponotus fragilis; also separate journal: Camponotus sansabeanus, vicinus, quercicola

Liometopum occidentale;  Prenolepis imparis; Myrmecocystus mexicanus

Pogonomyrmex subnitidus and previously californicus

Tetramorium sp.

Termites: Zootermopsis angusticollis

 

Isopods: A. gestroi, granulatum, kluugi, maculatum, vulgare; C. murina; P. hoffmannseggi, P. haasi, P. ornatus; V. parvus

Spoods: Phidippus sp.


#2 Offline OhNoNotAgain - Posted January 9 2021 - 1:46 PM

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Oh and royal jelly has a pH of 4 ....  :o  %)

 

https://www.scienced...80315140721.htm


Formiculture Journals::

Veromessor pergandei, andrei; Novomessor cockerelli

Camponotus fragilis; also separate journal: Camponotus sansabeanus, vicinus, quercicola

Liometopum occidentale;  Prenolepis imparis; Myrmecocystus mexicanus

Pogonomyrmex subnitidus and previously californicus

Tetramorium sp.

Termites: Zootermopsis angusticollis

 

Isopods: A. gestroi, granulatum, kluugi, maculatum, vulgare; C. murina; P. hoffmannseggi, P. haasi, P. ornatus; V. parvus

Spoods: Phidippus sp.


#3 Offline ConcordAntman - Posted January 10 2021 - 5:01 AM

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So, slightly acidic bee snot is what differentiates a worker form a queen  :yes:



#4 Offline Devi - Posted January 10 2021 - 6:50 AM

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Interesting!  I did not know that.  Thanks for sharing Concord.  You always share the most informative articles.  I love it, lol.






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