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Not really sure what species this is? Las Vegas, NV

id identification

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11 replies to this topic

#1 Offline olrakbt - Posted August 22 2020 - 3:20 PM

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Not really sure what species this is? Las Vegas, NV

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#2 Offline AntsDakota - Posted August 22 2020 - 3:26 PM

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Formica sp.


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"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version


#3 Online NickAnter - Posted August 22 2020 - 3:28 PM

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What time of day did you find this?


Species being kept:

 

Solenopsis truncorum, Solenopsis "plebeius", Solenopsis validiuscula, Solenopsis sp., Solenopsis xyloni, Solenopsis amblychila, Camponotus vicinus, Camponotus maritimus, Formica cf. subaenescens, Formica cf. aerata, Lasius cf. americanus, Lasius aphidicola, Lasius brevicornis, Lasius nr claviger, Pheidole navigans, Nylanderia vividula, Aphaenogaster occidentalis, Temnothorax rudis, Temnothorax cf. nitens, Pogonomyrmex californicus, and Strumigenys membranifera

 

People are stupid. It explains a lot...


#4 Offline Manitobant - Posted August 22 2020 - 4:14 PM

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The shape and size of the head makes me think its a species in the rufa group. If so, she is parasitic and will need host workers.

Edited by Manitobant, August 22 2020 - 4:58 PM.

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#5 Offline olrakbt - Posted August 22 2020 - 5:43 PM

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What time of day did you find this?

Around 5ish pm 


What time of day did you find this?

5ish pm 



#6 Offline Manitobant - Posted August 22 2020 - 6:11 PM

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Well id give her some host workers or pupae since I'm almost positive she's rufa group. Read this guide: https://www.formicul...ial-on-raising-

#7 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted August 23 2020 - 7:11 AM

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This is more likely Formica obtusopilosa

 

Consider taking more photos.


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#8 Offline Manitobant - Posted August 23 2020 - 10:12 AM

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This is more likely Formica obtusopilosa.

Consider taking more photos.

formica obtusopilosa is a raptiformica species, and raptiformica queens are way slimmer than this queen. She also doesn't have a clypeal notch, a characteristic of raptiformica.

Edited by Manitobant, August 23 2020 - 10:14 AM.


#9 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted August 23 2020 - 11:34 AM

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This is more likely Formica obtusopilosa.

Consider taking more photos.

formica obtusopilosa is a raptiformica species, and raptiformica queens are way slimmer than this queen. She also doesn't have a clypeal notch, a characteristic of raptiformica.

 

Ah, I was unaware that F. obtusopilosa was a raptiformica.

 

Can you see the clypeal notch with these photos? I cannot see it clearly. 



#10 Offline Manitobant - Posted August 23 2020 - 1:58 PM

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This is more likely Formica obtusopilosa.
Consider taking more photos.

formica obtusopilosa is a raptiformica species, and raptiformica queens are way slimmer than this queen. She also doesn't have a clypeal notch, a characteristic of raptiformica.
Ah, I was unaware that F. obtusopilosa was a raptiformica.
 
Can you see the clypeal notch with these photos? I cannot see it clearly.
if you look inbetween the mandibles you can see that it is straight and comes to a point. No flat area or notch. As for species I'm still positive it is rufa group, possibly formica dakotensis because of the shiny gaster and thorax.

#11 Offline rbarreto - Posted September 7 2020 - 7:31 PM

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I think this might be Myrmecocystus mimicus, olrakbt can you post more pictures?

My journal featuring most of my ants.

My other journal featuring Formica Bradleyi.

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#12 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted September 7 2020 - 7:32 PM

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I think this might be Myrmecocystus mimicus, olrakbt can you post more pictures?

Agreed.







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