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Cloud's Robin Egg Journal (Winter)


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5 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted April 29 2019 - 4:21 PM

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While walking out of school today, my friend and I found a tiny little American Robin egg on the ground. I had to go around waiting for the bus while holding the tiny, fragile egg in my hand, hoping no one would see it and smack it out of my hand. I was worried that it had been on the ground for too long in the sun, or that it could possibly be a chocolate egg! I got it home, went into my bathroom, turned the light off, and held a flashlight under the egg. I saw that the yolk was very prominent, and in the center of that yolk was a tiny little black speck only about three millimeters long, the embryo! The chick was alive! I told my girlfriend, and we decided to name the chick Winter. (Please let me know if you get the reference...) I have the chick set up in a small container with wet soil at the bottom. It is in a box with a light placed over it. It is set up this way as I do not have an incubator. I really hope that Winter hatches someday, as I would love to raise a baby robin! I've wanted a bird for so long now, and this is my chance!  :yahoo:


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#2 Offline ANTdrew - Posted April 30 2019 - 5:11 AM

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Good luck!


"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25  

Keep ordinary ants in extraordinary ways.


#3 Offline Acutus - Posted April 30 2019 - 5:35 AM

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Just to let you know your are currently breaking Federal laws. Robins are a protected species, all native birds in the US are protected by the migratory bird act. I know you want to do a good thing but lets say you even manage to incubate it and it hatches. What then? you raise it and release it? Who's going to teach it to be a Robin? You certainly can't keep it.

Best thing to do is to find the nest it came from and place it back in. It's also possible that the mother robin knew that egg was a problem for some reason and got rid of the egg. Don't worry about your human smell if you decide to put it back. Most birds can't smell anyways.


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#4 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted April 30 2019 - 5:57 AM

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Just to let you know your are currently breaking Federal laws. Robins are a protected species, all native birds in the US are protected by the migratory bird act. I know you want to do a good thing but lets say you even manage to incubate it and it hatches. What then? you raise it and release it? Who's going to teach it to be a Robin? You certainly can't keep it.

Best thing to do is to find the nest it came from and place it back in. It's also possible that the mother robin knew that egg was a problem for some reason and got rid of the egg. Don't worry about your human smell if you decide to put it back. Most birds can't smell anyways.

I have no clue where the nest would be. There is nowhere near where I found is where a robin nest could be. I have never seen a robin in that area, in fact, I rarely see robins where I am at all. There were also two other eggs that I found in the same place this morning. They were widely spaced out, and one was cracked, and the other had been stepped on. And I also found it at my school, so I have no clue how I would be able to put the egg back.


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#5 Offline Acutus - Posted April 30 2019 - 6:07 AM

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Well it's possible a squirrel or something is taking the eggs then for whatever reason dropping them.Bird eggs are a very good food source for animals and mostly everything eats them. Even herbivorous ones. With out an incubator your chances of raising the egg are next to 0 anyways. Bird eggs need to be turned periodically. Then there's the fact that it's just against the law. Probably best to let nature take it's course.

Sorry to be a downer.


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#6 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted April 30 2019 - 6:41 AM

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Well it's possible a squirrel or something is taking the eggs then for whatever reason dropping them.Bird eggs are a very good food source for animals and mostly everything eats them. Even herbivorous ones. With out an incubator your chances of raising the egg are next to 0 anyways. Bird eggs need to be turned periodically. Then there's the fact that it's just against the law. Probably best to let nature take it's course.

Sorry to be a downer.

I'll try and think of something, cause I can't just let this chick die. And also, I do have an incubator that I made for it, and I do turn the egg periodically. I may take it to my local wildlife center after it hatches as they won't take bird eggs, only chicks.


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