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Can I take care of this fungi?

fungi

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#1 Offline CamponotusLover - Posted September 13 2018 - 3:13 PM

CamponotusLover

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So, excuse me for not posting any pictures, but anyway, on the rails of our rotten staircase outside there is a troop of Dacryopinax spathularia (google pls no photos mobile device won't let me), also known as Buddhas delight in china because it is a jelly fungus and edible.

I have loved fungi since before I loved ants, but I never took care of any or grew any. I am desperate to know, if I sawed off the portion that grows this fungus every year, could I take care of it an how?

I have cared for:

Camponotus Nearcticus
Brachymyrmex Depilis
Brachymyrmex Patagonicus
Crematogaster Cerasi
Prenolepis Imparis

Check out my Youtube channel :) 
https://www.youtube....BxGjDiu8rEAefAg ds0AW13YBUIjZ091cfe-E3sRnyV3Rs8RnA4eIJTC


#2 Offline CampoKing - Posted September 15 2018 - 3:25 PM

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Well it seems to be a generic jelly fungus that grows on rotting wood.
Also, since many many many fungi grow readily on coffee grounds, you can try that too.
I would setup a container with some breathing holes, as if you were housing a small animal, with moist coffee grounds, and experiment with what happens.
If coffee isn't agreeable to this fungus, then try wood in the same way.

Oh, and used coffee grounds are usually available from coffee shops for free. Starbucks is often very friendly about providing coffee grounds in bulk bags at no cost

Edited by CampoKing, September 15 2018 - 3:26 PM.

Keeper of:
Camponotus (10x C. pennsylvanicus & 2x C. nearcticus)




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