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Lasius Neoniger going through metamorphosis without cocoons. . .


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#1 Offline Jamiesname - Posted July 11 2018 - 6:35 AM

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So this is really strange. I have a colony of Lasius Neoniger that have been going through the process of enclosing in cocoons to pupate. Now they quit. They're doing it without the cocoons. I have a bunch of white, ant shaped larvae piled up in their nest. Their pupae look just like my Aphaenogaster tennesseensis, only smaller.

Any idea why this is happening? Is it normal?

I can get pics in a couple hours if needed.

Edited by Jamiesname, July 11 2018 - 6:38 AM.


#2 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted July 11 2018 - 12:22 PM

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Cocoons are ideal but optional for the species that weave them. The evolutionary benefits are convoluted, but it seems to protect the inhabitant from their own workers in the event of a contaminant that the pupa has the potential to overcome. It may also provide modest protection from fungal spores.


If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

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Black lives still matter.


#3 Offline CoolColJ - Posted July 12 2018 - 3:41 PM

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Maybe they need substrate

 

Some of my ants sometimes skip the cocoons, especially if there are not enough workers around to help them weave one

The brood developed fine


Edited by CoolColJ, July 12 2018 - 3:42 PM.

Current ant colonies -
1) Opisthopsis Rufithorax (strobe ant), Melophorus Sp1. (furnace ant) red and black, Melophorus sp2. black and orange
Lots of Pheidole colonies....
Polyrhachis rufifemur, Rhytidoponera aspera gamergate colony

Journal = http://www.formicult...ra-iridomyrmex/

Nasutitermes fumigatus/dixoni subterranean pet/feeder termite colony journal = http://www.formicult...ournal/?p=96808
Schedorhinotermes intermedius termites - pet/feeder journal = http://www.formicult...feeder-journal/


#4 Offline Jamiesname - Posted July 12 2018 - 5:16 PM

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Thanks for the info, guys. I was worried, even though they look and seem to be behaving normal other than that. I moved them into a new test tube just in case.




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