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Anting in the Southern Sierras

anting tips nuptial flights

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#1 Offline kgollehon - Posted June 13 2018 - 7:10 PM

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Going to be summering in the Southern Sierra Nevada mountains, wondering if anyone has some monitoring tips/ places they have had success in that area. Specifically I live in Tehachapi, which is in the high desert mountains west of the Mojave Desert. I caught a Formica queen there over the weekend but as I've been back in LA this week it's likely that that species has finished flying in my region. I'm mainly hunting for Camponotus queens so if anyone has information it'd be greatly appreciated! 



#2 Offline nurbs - Posted June 13 2018 - 11:26 PM

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Most Camponotus have already flow in the lower elevations, so check the higher elevations at night, above 6000ft. You will find some for sure. I'll be heading into the Eastern Sierras myself next week for a family vacation, and will no doubt also be looking for ants.

 

You live in a great spot for the Summer flyers. Anytime you see a flash flood, look for flights the next day!


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#3 Offline antsinmypants - Posted June 14 2018 - 6:41 AM

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The few Camponotus modoc queens I caught in the Central Sierra Mountains were just under the surface of the rotting bark. There's no need to hack away deeper unless you need a colony of feeder Dampwood termites. The nymphs of the latter are all you need to get a queen and king to develop from. I just water their wood only once every few weeks to prevent mold from developing.



#4 Offline nurbs - Posted June 14 2018 - 10:12 AM

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The few Camponotus modoc queens I caught in the Central Sierra Mountains were just under the surface of the rotting bark. There's no need to hack away deeper unless you need a colony of feeder Dampwood termites. The nymphs of the latter are all you need to get a queen and king to develop from. I just water their wood only once every few weeks to prevent mold from developing.

 

Curious, how far down South from the Sierras did you find C. modoc? Specifically which spot in the central Sierras? Been up to Mount Whitney and there are no C. modoc there. Always have to drive all the way North to find them.


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#5 Offline antsinmypants - Posted June 14 2018 - 1:38 PM

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Almost 5 miles from the intersection of 168 and Dinkey Creek Road, as you head towards Dinkey Creek from 168, there's an entrance road on the left with a gate. Every time I've been there it's been closed so my friend and I just park in front of it. There are fallen trees within 100 yards or so from there. That's where them C. modoc have been hiding out after their mating flight. 2 years ago and this year I've found newly mated alates in early May. The elevation here is about 5.5k feet (based on Shaver Lake's elevation). I haven't had any luck finding them at higher elevations at that time of the year. I suspect it may be due to the colder temperatures there.


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#6 Online Nare - Posted June 14 2018 - 1:45 PM

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The few Camponotus modoc queens I caught in the Central Sierra Mountains were just under the surface of the rotting bark. There's no need to hack away deeper unless you need a colony of feeder Dampwood termites. The nymphs of the latter are all you need to get a queen and king to develop from. I just water their wood only once every few weeks to prevent mold from developing.

Sort of unrelated, but I'm desperate for termites (Sounds weird but I figure I'm in the right place). You wouldn't happen to know a ton about subterranean termites, specifically their microhabitat? I'm not sure whether to look in stumps, logs, under leaf litter, or what. Any help is greatly appreciated.


I keep termites - check them out! I've also made a guide...


#7 Offline antsinmypants - Posted June 18 2018 - 5:03 PM

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The few Camponotus modoc queens I caught in the Central Sierra Mountains were just under the surface of the rotting bark. There's no need to hack away deeper unless you need a colony of feeder Dampwood termites. The nymphs of the latter are all you need to get a queen and king to develop from. I just water their wood only once every few weeks to prevent mold from developing.

Sort of unrelated, but I'm desperate for termites (Sounds weird but I figure I'm in the right place). You wouldn't happen to know a ton about subterranean termites, specifically their microhabitat? I'm not sure whether to look in stumps, logs, under leaf litter, or what. Any help is greatly appreciated.

 

 

Sorry, but I'm not qualified to talk about subterranean termites other than to say that if they escape their enclosure your house becomes their free 24-hour all-you-can-eat buffet.



#8 Offline YsTheAnt - Posted June 19 2018 - 4:13 PM

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The few Camponotus modoc queens I caught in the Central Sierra Mountains were just under the surface of the rotting bark. There's no need to hack away deeper unless you need a colony of feeder Dampwood termites. The nymphs of the latter are all you need to get a queen and king to develop from. I just water their wood only once every few weeks to prevent mold from developing.


Curious, how far down South from the Sierras did you find C. modoc? Specifically which spot in the central Sierras? Been up to Mount Whitney and there are no C. modoc there. Always have to drive all the way North to find them.
Where in the Eastern Sierras you planning to go for Camponotus? I was hoping I could catch a few myself, as around here only myrmentoma Camponotus and C. quercicola flew. No Vicinus whatsoever, and we don't even have C. levigatus or C. modoc.





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