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Best place to catch Tetramorium caespitum (pavement ants?)


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14 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Nawor3565 - Posted June 11 2018 - 8:31 AM

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Live in upstate NY. I've been trying to catch a Tetramorium caespitum (pavement ant) queen, but so far I've only found two carpenter ant queens. I live in a pretty urban area, but not too far from a park with plenty of walking paths and trees. I'm wondering, to anyone who's caught these guys before, if they had more luck in an urban area, or a more natural one. And any other tips for where/when to catch them. Thanks!



#2 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted June 11 2018 - 8:39 AM

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Tetramorium caespitum is in Europe, in North America we have Tetramorium immigrans.  It is said that they fly in the morning, usually between 4-7AM. This means that you will probably need two warm days in a row, to make the morning somewhat warm (or at least not cold). However, you can still find queens throughout the day and they aren't restricted to flying in the morning. On a large flight of Tetramorium immigrans, you will usually find lots of queens wandering the sidewalks during the day. 


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#3 Offline sirjordanncurtis - Posted June 11 2018 - 8:46 AM

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You're going to have more luck with Tetramorium immigrans, which is Tetramorium caespitum sp. E, the American version of the Tetramorium caespitum. Those are found under any flat rocks or pavements. You could also just wait for a flight.

 

Btw, how the heck do you find Camponotus and not Tetramorium...

 

I only know them to have a short period of about 2 days for flights, after which most to all alates disappear.


Edited by sirjordanncurtis, June 11 2018 - 8:47 AM.


#4 Offline rbarreto - Posted June 11 2018 - 8:51 AM

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You're going to have more luck with Tetramorium immigrans, which is Tetramorium caespitum sp. E, the American version of the Tetramorium caespitum. Those are found under any flat rocks or pavements. You could also just wait for a flight.

 

Btw, how the heck do you find Camponotus and not Tetramorium...

 

I only know them to have a short period of about 2 days for flights, after which most to all alates disappear.

I have seen Camponotus pennsylvanicus queens every warm night for the past 2 and a half weeks.


My journal featuring:

Aphaenogaster picea

Lasius claviger

Lasius umbratus

Lasius sp. (black workers)

Lasius sp. (yellow/orange workers)

Formica pallidefulva (northern color form)

Prenolepis imparis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus novaeboracensis

Temnothorax cf. curvispinosus

Tetramorium immigrans ( 2 polygynous, 1 monogynous)

 


#5 Offline sirjordanncurtis - Posted June 11 2018 - 8:58 AM

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You're going to have more luck with Tetramorium immigrans, which is Tetramorium caespitum sp. E, the American version of the Tetramorium caespitum. Those are found under any flat rocks or pavements. You could also just wait for a flight.

 

Btw, how the heck do you find Camponotus and not Tetramorium...

 

I only know them to have a short period of about 2 days for flights, after which most to all alates disappear.

I have seen Camponotus pennsylvanicus queens every warm night for the past 2 and a half weeks.

 

Heck, I need a new home.



#6 Offline rbarreto - Posted June 11 2018 - 9:06 AM

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Heck, I need a new home.

 

 

This is not a good thing. Although very large, Camponotus pennsylvanicus are rather plain looking. They are so dominant that the only other Camponotus species I have found is one C. novaeboracensis. I would love a chance to keep some of the awesome species you guys have there in California. So appreciate what you got  (y).


Edited by rbarreto, June 11 2018 - 9:08 AM.

My journal featuring:

Aphaenogaster picea

Lasius claviger

Lasius umbratus

Lasius sp. (black workers)

Lasius sp. (yellow/orange workers)

Formica pallidefulva (northern color form)

Prenolepis imparis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus novaeboracensis

Temnothorax cf. curvispinosus

Tetramorium immigrans ( 2 polygynous, 1 monogynous)

 


#7 Offline CNewton - Posted June 11 2018 - 9:15 AM

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Tetramorium get stuck to vehicle dew. They fly in the early morning, land on cars and get stuck. You can walk down the street and see the black specs on cars.



#8 Offline VoidElecent - Posted June 11 2018 - 9:28 AM

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Many ant keepers collect Tetramorium queens from swimming pools in the mornings after warm summer nights. I have for the past couple of years and been quite successful, although I do believe chlorine generally has a negative effect on their health.


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#9 Offline sirjordanncurtis - Posted June 11 2018 - 10:19 AM

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You can also find them on shiny cars.



#10 Offline mallonje - Posted June 11 2018 - 10:55 AM

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Found mine under a yellow arc light street light after a warm humid day.

Founding:

                 1 P. Imparis queen caught 4/26/18

                 2 L. Umbratus caught 5/8/18

                 1 C. Pennsylvanicus queen caught 5/7/18 1st Eggs 5/17/18 

                 1 C. Pennsylvanicus queen caught 5/17/18 1st Eggs 5/22/18

                 1 C. Pennsylvanicus queen caught 5/31/18

                 1 T. Caespitum(?) queen caught 6/1/18


#11 Offline noebl1 - Posted June 11 2018 - 11:08 AM

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Many ant keepers collect Tetramorium queens from swimming pools in the mornings after warm summer nights. I have for the past couple of years and been quite successful, although I do believe chlorine generally has a negative effect on their health.

 

I got 13 Tetramorium queens from a pool from a friend.  All 13 were fertile, and I gave 10 of them away and kept 3.  Of those 3, all died within 3 years, while the workers/brood were fine.  Unsure if related to the pool exposure of a genetic issue of that population.

 

I haven't had much luck finding mine in the early am (as tbh not a morning person), but have found them usually in the afternoon/evening looking for a place to start a founding chamber.  When we were having work done on our deck, they had some sheets of cardboard on the pavement driveway, and I'd often find them hiding under the cardboard.


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#12 Offline BMM - Posted June 11 2018 - 12:35 PM

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I found most of my Tetramorium queens wandering around on the sidewalk shortly after sunrise.


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#13 Offline WeatherAnt - Posted June 12 2018 - 7:32 PM

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You'll be surprised how many you can find floating in a swimming pool just after sunrise. 



#14 Offline T.C. - Posted June 12 2018 - 8:28 PM

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Many ant keepers collect Tetramorium queens from swimming pools in the mornings after warm summer nights. I have for the past couple of years and been quite successful, although I do believe chlorine generally has a negative effect on their health.


Chlorine levels are gonna vary from pool to pool, but I personally have never had an issue with pool caught queens.

#15 Offline Major - Posted July 7 2018 - 7:06 PM

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It’s called Tetramorium Immigrans. And as a fellow NY anted here’s some advice, dry looking on pavement or dirt covered areas in the afternoon. I share your experience with finding Camponotus before Tetramorium.
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