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AnthonyP163's Aphaenogaster spp. Journal (updated 8-10-18)

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#1 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted May 13 2018 - 11:04 AM

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5-13-18

 

A few days ago when it warmed up outside, I found 2 very small Aphaenogaster spp. colonies under rocks, they were the few small colonies out of many large ones. Aphaenogaster tends to often bring their whole colonies to the surface on warmer days, and if you're quick, it's usually as simple as scooping up the dirt and having a colony. In order to not really damage the population, I limited myself at two. There were many larger colonies and a few smaller ones, but I decided to let them be. 

 

They are undoubtedly two different species, one is larger and one is smaller. I will soon look at antmaps and antweb to figure out what species these are.

 

The smaller sized ants are in an antkit nest that I had bought over a year ago, attached to an outworld via tubing. The larger ones are in a small test tube in an outworld. 

 

Here are some pictures of the larger ants moving into the test tube. 

 

 

Here's the queen

 

And here's the smaller colony

 

NOTE: Aphaenogaster are the most unclean ants ever!


Edited by AnthonyP163, August 10 2018 - 5:26 PM.

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#2 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted May 13 2018 - 11:23 AM

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Both colonies appear to be Aphaenogaster rudis. One likely has smaller workers due to the fact that it is a younger colony. Younger colonies have smaller workers.

 

Many Aphaenogaster spp. workers look extremely similar, but the queen you showed is definitely Aphaenogaster rudis. 

 

NOTE: Aphaenogaster are the most unclean ants ever!

I don't know about ever, but they are certainly the messiest I've ever kept.


Edited by Mettcollsuss, May 13 2018 - 11:26 AM.


#3 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted May 13 2018 - 11:28 AM

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Both colonies appear to be Aphaenogaster rudis. Many Aphaenogaster spp. The queen looks like workers look like but the queen you showed is definitely Aphaenogaster rudis. 

 

NOTE: Aphaenogaster are the most unclean ants ever!

I don't know about ever, but they are certainly the messiest I've ever kept.

Antmaps took Aphaenogaster rudis off of the list of ants for Wisconsin, I have no idea why but I do know they are totally wrong. And the workers and queens of both colonies have considerable size differences and color patterns. I am guessing one is A. rudis and A. fulva as the queen of the smaller colony seems to be a bit brighter, indicating A. fulva. I'll figure it out.



#4 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted May 14 2018 - 5:21 AM

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Well, Antmaps is definitely wrong in this case. I know for sure that the queen you posted is A. rudis. You can check my journal on them for reference. 

 

The best way to tell them apart is by looking at the spines. Fulva has longer spines than rudis.

 

casent0104859_p_1_high.jpg

Aphaenogaster fulva

 

 

casent0104843_p_1_high.jpg

Aphaenogaster rudis

 

 

 

EDIT: It would also help if we could get a photo of the queen of the smaller colony.


Edited by Mettcollsuss, May 14 2018 - 5:22 AM.


#5 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted August 10 2018 - 3:59 PM

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8-10-18

 

The previous colonies were sold to other Wisconsin antkeepers.

 

In the beginning of August, on the same day S. molesta and B. depilis flew, I caught one Aphaenogaster picea queen at my blacklight. Soon after being captured, she shed her wings.

 

Here she is with a few eggs.


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#6 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted September 28 2018 - 3:35 PM

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9-28-18

 

The Aphaenogaster picea has gotten workers lately, and they've taken some honey. 







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