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AntsAreUs's Ponera pennsylvanica Journal

ponera ponera sp. ponera pennsylvanica

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35 replies to this topic

#1 Offline AntsAreUs - Posted April 14 2018 - 3:14 PM

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I don't have high hopes for raising these, but I'm going to experiment a little just in case. The main issue I think I'll have is feeding them. If anybody has recommendations of what to feed them, I will attempt it. Right now I plan on feeding them springtails and diplurans (sugar water?). So far I have a handful and currently catching more as I see them.

 

The setup:

 


Edited by AntsAreUs, June 26 2018 - 7:28 AM.

  • noebl1 and Martialis like this

Currently keeping:

Ants:    Stigmatomma pallipes

            Temnothorax schaumii - Journal

            Temnothorax curvispinosus

            Myrmecina americana - Journal

            Ponera pennsylvanica - Journal

            Formica incerta Journal

            Formica subsericea

            Formica rubicunda

            Aphaenogaster tennesseensis - Journal

            Aphaenogaster rudis Journal

            Myrmica spp. Journal

            Camponotus chromaiodes - Journal

            Camponotus pennsylvanicus

            Camponotus subbarbatus - Journal

            Camponotus sp.

            Strumigenys pergandei - Journal (Discontinued)

            Strumigenys pilinasis - Journal

            Hypoponera opacior

            Tetramorium immigrans - Journal

            Tapinoma sessile - Journal

            Lasius americanus

            Lasius neoniger

            Lasius murphyi

            Solenopsis molesta

            Pheidole pilifera

 

Other:  Millipedes

Isopods

Springtails

Soil Centipedes (Geophilomorpha sp.)

Stone Centipedes (Lithobius sp.)

Mealworms/Superworms

Indian Mealmoth Culture

Dipluras

Some types of mites


#2 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted April 14 2018 - 8:45 PM

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Seems good, they don't seem to do good in test tubes for me but I see you already have that problem solved. The springtails most commonly on the market (Folsomia candida) are probably the best option to feed her because they are slow and clumsy, and reproduce fast and grow to a decent size.



#3 Offline AntsAreUs - Posted April 16 2018 - 2:01 PM

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Seems good, they don't seem to do good in test tubes for me but I see you already have that problem solved. The springtails most commonly on the market (Folsomia candida) are probably the best option to feed her because they are slow and clumsy, and reproduce fast and grow to a decent size.

I actually have Folsomia sp. and Cyphoderus sp. in my area, but they are quite difficult to collect in large amount. Right now I have a large culture of Tomocerus vulgaris and have been putting the smaller nymphs in the setups. Haven't seen any foraging behavior yet, but they love to dig.

 

Also if anyone is wandering, my setup consists of 2 small plastic cups (bought 50 for $2.50) with homemade compost in between them. I also poked a tiny hole in the middle for hydration. This makes it very easy to feed them as all I have to do is lift the top cup and put the springtails in.


Edited by AntsAreUs, April 16 2018 - 2:10 PM.

Currently keeping:

Ants:    Stigmatomma pallipes

            Temnothorax schaumii - Journal

            Temnothorax curvispinosus

            Myrmecina americana - Journal

            Ponera pennsylvanica - Journal

            Formica incerta Journal

            Formica subsericea

            Formica rubicunda

            Aphaenogaster tennesseensis - Journal

            Aphaenogaster rudis Journal

            Myrmica spp. Journal

            Camponotus chromaiodes - Journal

            Camponotus pennsylvanicus

            Camponotus subbarbatus - Journal

            Camponotus sp.

            Strumigenys pergandei - Journal (Discontinued)

            Strumigenys pilinasis - Journal

            Hypoponera opacior

            Tetramorium immigrans - Journal

            Tapinoma sessile - Journal

            Lasius americanus

            Lasius neoniger

            Lasius murphyi

            Solenopsis molesta

            Pheidole pilifera

 

Other:  Millipedes

Isopods

Springtails

Soil Centipedes (Geophilomorpha sp.)

Stone Centipedes (Lithobius sp.)

Mealworms/Superworms

Indian Mealmoth Culture

Dipluras

Some types of mites


#4 Offline noebl1 - Posted April 16 2018 - 3:41 PM

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I have a Ponera pennsylvanica queen I've had alive since I caught her back on 9/5, and she survived hibernation.  She readily takes fruit flies (about one a week), and pretty much any small flying insect.  I have not fed any sugars at this point (not sure if they even would take it as predacious).  I can't tell if she's laid or not as the coconut fiber/sand mixture makes it hard to tell.   Again, like you, just an experiment as not sure if she'll survive, lay, or even is fertile.  If you can see in the the space in the top, I put the fruit flies in there, and they disappear.  I've added springtails (Folsomia candida from NEHerp )to keep the mold in check, and she leaves them alone.  Impossible to see her on camera, but there's a chamber towards the bottom that she tends to frequent, and think there may be an egg, but not 100% sure.

 

RoIU8MW.jpg

 

If you ever put a live fruit fly or gnat in, they are pretty aggressive hunters to watch.



#5 Offline AntsAreUs - Posted April 16 2018 - 5:05 PM

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Got a nice shot of one of them snagging a moth.

 


  • noebl1 likes this

Currently keeping:

Ants:    Stigmatomma pallipes

            Temnothorax schaumii - Journal

            Temnothorax curvispinosus

            Myrmecina americana - Journal

            Ponera pennsylvanica - Journal

            Formica incerta Journal

            Formica subsericea

            Formica rubicunda

            Aphaenogaster tennesseensis - Journal

            Aphaenogaster rudis Journal

            Myrmica spp. Journal

            Camponotus chromaiodes - Journal

            Camponotus pennsylvanicus

            Camponotus subbarbatus - Journal

            Camponotus sp.

            Strumigenys pergandei - Journal (Discontinued)

            Strumigenys pilinasis - Journal

            Hypoponera opacior

            Tetramorium immigrans - Journal

            Tapinoma sessile - Journal

            Lasius americanus

            Lasius neoniger

            Lasius murphyi

            Solenopsis molesta

            Pheidole pilifera

 

Other:  Millipedes

Isopods

Springtails

Soil Centipedes (Geophilomorpha sp.)

Stone Centipedes (Lithobius sp.)

Mealworms/Superworms

Indian Mealmoth Culture

Dipluras

Some types of mites


#6 Offline MegaMyrmex - Posted April 17 2018 - 4:07 AM

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I have my col9ny housed in a small emtpy container with a layer of plaster on the bottom and some peat moss layered very thinly on top. I clump some of the substrate creating a mound for them to nest in and I keep the humidity very moist.
Spoiler

#7 Offline AntsAreUs - Posted April 17 2018 - 1:13 PM

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I have my col9ny housed in a small emtpy container with a layer of plaster on the bottom and some peat moss layered very thinly on top. I clump some of the substrate creating a mound for them to nest in and I keep the humidity very moist.

I'll consider adding peat moss to my next setups, thanks.


Currently keeping:

Ants:    Stigmatomma pallipes

            Temnothorax schaumii - Journal

            Temnothorax curvispinosus

            Myrmecina americana - Journal

            Ponera pennsylvanica - Journal

            Formica incerta Journal

            Formica subsericea

            Formica rubicunda

            Aphaenogaster tennesseensis - Journal

            Aphaenogaster rudis Journal

            Myrmica spp. Journal

            Camponotus chromaiodes - Journal

            Camponotus pennsylvanicus

            Camponotus subbarbatus - Journal

            Camponotus sp.

            Strumigenys pergandei - Journal (Discontinued)

            Strumigenys pilinasis - Journal

            Hypoponera opacior

            Tetramorium immigrans - Journal

            Tapinoma sessile - Journal

            Lasius americanus

            Lasius neoniger

            Lasius murphyi

            Solenopsis molesta

            Pheidole pilifera

 

Other:  Millipedes

Isopods

Springtails

Soil Centipedes (Geophilomorpha sp.)

Stone Centipedes (Lithobius sp.)

Mealworms/Superworms

Indian Mealmoth Culture

Dipluras

Some types of mites


#8 Offline AntsAreUs - Posted April 22 2018 - 11:05 AM

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First egg has been laid! It looks like a little noodle. Pics coming soon...


  • noebl1 and AnthonyP163 like this

Currently keeping:

Ants:    Stigmatomma pallipes

            Temnothorax schaumii - Journal

            Temnothorax curvispinosus

            Myrmecina americana - Journal

            Ponera pennsylvanica - Journal

            Formica incerta Journal

            Formica subsericea

            Formica rubicunda

            Aphaenogaster tennesseensis - Journal

            Aphaenogaster rudis Journal

            Myrmica spp. Journal

            Camponotus chromaiodes - Journal

            Camponotus pennsylvanicus

            Camponotus subbarbatus - Journal

            Camponotus sp.

            Strumigenys pergandei - Journal (Discontinued)

            Strumigenys pilinasis - Journal

            Hypoponera opacior

            Tetramorium immigrans - Journal

            Tapinoma sessile - Journal

            Lasius americanus

            Lasius neoniger

            Lasius murphyi

            Solenopsis molesta

            Pheidole pilifera

 

Other:  Millipedes

Isopods

Springtails

Soil Centipedes (Geophilomorpha sp.)

Stone Centipedes (Lithobius sp.)

Mealworms/Superworms

Indian Mealmoth Culture

Dipluras

Some types of mites


#9 Offline VenomousBeast - Posted April 23 2018 - 6:23 AM

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Hey! So my Ponera pennsylvanica colony has about 20ish workers and has 3 larvae. I've had this colony for almost a year. They love Dipluras and some crushed Isopods. I've noticed that they need very high humidity. I use soaked wood as a substrate as you can see them better as the blackish color of them pop out more in the tanish color. I haven't noticed them drinking any sugar-water, honey-water, etc. I've found large colonies in large pieces of decayed wood, almost up to their 100 worker expectations. 


  • noebl1 likes this

-Haden Lee

Keeps:

Lasius neoniger-1

 

Stigmatomma Pallipes-1 :yahoo: (see my journal!)

 

Solenopsis invicta INVASIVE : 1 queen and a decent egg pile, DO NOT KEEP THIS SPECIES, I am in a study about the adaptability of RIFA to cold climates such as DC.

 

Trachymyrmex sp.-1

 

Aphenogaster sp -1

 

Crematogaster sp -3

 

Pheidole megacephala INVASIVE : 8 queens and 50ish workers with decent amount of brood, another study being conducted.

 

NEW:

 

Dolichovespula maculata (Bald-faced Hornet) -1

 

 
 
 

 


#10 Offline noebl1 - Posted April 23 2018 - 6:28 AM

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Hey! So my Ponera pennsylvanica colony has about 20ish workers and has 3 larvae. I've had this colony for almost a year. They love Dipluras and some crushed Isopods. I've noticed that they need very high humidity. I use soaked wood as a substrate as you can see them better as the blackish color of them pop out more in the tanish color. I haven't noticed them drinking any sugar-water, honey-water, etc. I've found large colonies in large pieces of decayed wood, almost up to their 100 worker expectations. 

 

These posts encourage me as mine is really damp due to the coconut fiber and absorption through out and only the very edges are dry (so there's a gradient).    Mine hasn't touched any of the springtails I put in, but will drag fruit flies and other small insects into the nesting area.  She doesn't always finish eating them, so the springtails help keep the mold in check.  Now if she'd only lay :(



#11 Offline VenomousBeast - Posted April 23 2018 - 6:41 AM

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Try increasing the temperature a bit, mine had to have a bit of a temperature increase to start the egg laying process. Also, they are a slow growing colony so don't expect eggs within the first month to four months of caching her.


  • noebl1 likes this

-Haden Lee

Keeps:

Lasius neoniger-1

 

Stigmatomma Pallipes-1 :yahoo: (see my journal!)

 

Solenopsis invicta INVASIVE : 1 queen and a decent egg pile, DO NOT KEEP THIS SPECIES, I am in a study about the adaptability of RIFA to cold climates such as DC.

 

Trachymyrmex sp.-1

 

Aphenogaster sp -1

 

Crematogaster sp -3

 

Pheidole megacephala INVASIVE : 8 queens and 50ish workers with decent amount of brood, another study being conducted.

 

NEW:

 

Dolichovespula maculata (Bald-faced Hornet) -1

 

 
 
 

 


#12 Offline VenomousBeast - Posted April 23 2018 - 6:44 AM

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I also currently have 2 founding queens in test tube setups. They work in test tubes ONLY if moist substrate is added. I've never been able to produce a colony in a test tube setup without substrate.


-Haden Lee

Keeps:

Lasius neoniger-1

 

Stigmatomma Pallipes-1 :yahoo: (see my journal!)

 

Solenopsis invicta INVASIVE : 1 queen and a decent egg pile, DO NOT KEEP THIS SPECIES, I am in a study about the adaptability of RIFA to cold climates such as DC.

 

Trachymyrmex sp.-1

 

Aphenogaster sp -1

 

Crematogaster sp -3

 

Pheidole megacephala INVASIVE : 8 queens and 50ish workers with decent amount of brood, another study being conducted.

 

NEW:

 

Dolichovespula maculata (Bald-faced Hornet) -1

 

 
 
 

 


#13 Offline VenomousBeast - Posted April 23 2018 - 6:47 AM

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Also are these ant species polygyne?? My brother has a colony of them with 3 or 4 queens and they are functioning together nicely. 


-Haden Lee

Keeps:

Lasius neoniger-1

 

Stigmatomma Pallipes-1 :yahoo: (see my journal!)

 

Solenopsis invicta INVASIVE : 1 queen and a decent egg pile, DO NOT KEEP THIS SPECIES, I am in a study about the adaptability of RIFA to cold climates such as DC.

 

Trachymyrmex sp.-1

 

Aphenogaster sp -1

 

Crematogaster sp -3

 

Pheidole megacephala INVASIVE : 8 queens and 50ish workers with decent amount of brood, another study being conducted.

 

NEW:

 

Dolichovespula maculata (Bald-faced Hornet) -1

 

 
 
 

 


#14 Offline noebl1 - Posted April 23 2018 - 6:50 AM

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Try increasing the temperature a bit, mine had to have a bit of a temperature increase to start the egg laying process. Also, they are a slow growing colony so don't expect eggs within the first month to four months of caching her.

 

I caught mine last fall, she overwintered in a test tube with substrate, and in March I took her out of hibernation and put her in the formicarium in the pic above.  I'll try heating and see if it encourages it, I appreciate the help (and sorry AntsAreUs for hijacking a bit, but it's not a common species I've seen kept.)  I was getting worried my nest was too damp, so happy to hear it's where it should be, you have no idea :D

 

About what temp do you keep her at?



#15 Offline VenomousBeast - Posted April 23 2018 - 7:06 AM

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Well, I keep mine at 68 degrees water temp and air temp around 75ish. It depends on where you are from. In northern areas I would say decrease the temp 1-5 degrees. Also, make a temperature gradient so she can pick what temp she wants. 


  • noebl1 likes this

-Haden Lee

Keeps:

Lasius neoniger-1

 

Stigmatomma Pallipes-1 :yahoo: (see my journal!)

 

Solenopsis invicta INVASIVE : 1 queen and a decent egg pile, DO NOT KEEP THIS SPECIES, I am in a study about the adaptability of RIFA to cold climates such as DC.

 

Trachymyrmex sp.-1

 

Aphenogaster sp -1

 

Crematogaster sp -3

 

Pheidole megacephala INVASIVE : 8 queens and 50ish workers with decent amount of brood, another study being conducted.

 

NEW:

 

Dolichovespula maculata (Bald-faced Hornet) -1

 

 
 
 

 


#16 Offline AntsAreUs - Posted April 23 2018 - 1:22 PM

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Also are these ant species polygyne?? My brother has a colony of them with 3 or 4 queens and they are functioning together nicely. 

Yes they are, they can only found colonies alone though and will end up wrestling if put together.

 

 

 

(and sorry AntsAreUs for hijacking a bit, but it's not a common species I've seen kept.)

That's the point of making this journal.  ;)


Edited by AntsAreUs, April 23 2018 - 1:28 PM.

  • noebl1 likes this

Currently keeping:

Ants:    Stigmatomma pallipes

            Temnothorax schaumii - Journal

            Temnothorax curvispinosus

            Myrmecina americana - Journal

            Ponera pennsylvanica - Journal

            Formica incerta Journal

            Formica subsericea

            Formica rubicunda

            Aphaenogaster tennesseensis - Journal

            Aphaenogaster rudis Journal

            Myrmica spp. Journal

            Camponotus chromaiodes - Journal

            Camponotus pennsylvanicus

            Camponotus subbarbatus - Journal

            Camponotus sp.

            Strumigenys pergandei - Journal (Discontinued)

            Strumigenys pilinasis - Journal

            Hypoponera opacior

            Tetramorium immigrans - Journal

            Tapinoma sessile - Journal

            Lasius americanus

            Lasius neoniger

            Lasius murphyi

            Solenopsis molesta

            Pheidole pilifera

 

Other:  Millipedes

Isopods

Springtails

Soil Centipedes (Geophilomorpha sp.)

Stone Centipedes (Lithobius sp.)

Mealworms/Superworms

Indian Mealmoth Culture

Dipluras

Some types of mites


#17 Offline AntsAreUs - Posted April 23 2018 - 1:24 PM

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Pics:

 

They seem to like moth larva too

 

2 egg with one of my queens


  • rdurham02 likes this

Currently keeping:

Ants:    Stigmatomma pallipes

            Temnothorax schaumii - Journal

            Temnothorax curvispinosus

            Myrmecina americana - Journal

            Ponera pennsylvanica - Journal

            Formica incerta Journal

            Formica subsericea

            Formica rubicunda

            Aphaenogaster tennesseensis - Journal

            Aphaenogaster rudis Journal

            Myrmica spp. Journal

            Camponotus chromaiodes - Journal

            Camponotus pennsylvanicus

            Camponotus subbarbatus - Journal

            Camponotus sp.

            Strumigenys pergandei - Journal (Discontinued)

            Strumigenys pilinasis - Journal

            Hypoponera opacior

            Tetramorium immigrans - Journal

            Tapinoma sessile - Journal

            Lasius americanus

            Lasius neoniger

            Lasius murphyi

            Solenopsis molesta

            Pheidole pilifera

 

Other:  Millipedes

Isopods

Springtails

Soil Centipedes (Geophilomorpha sp.)

Stone Centipedes (Lithobius sp.)

Mealworms/Superworms

Indian Mealmoth Culture

Dipluras

Some types of mites


#18 Offline AntsAreUs - Posted April 28 2018 - 3:46 PM

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4-28-18

 

I now have 6 queens. Only 3 queens have eggs, one with 2 eggs, another with 3 eggs, and the last one with 1 egg. They also like crushed Tomoceridae (large springtails).


Edited by AntsAreUs, April 28 2018 - 4:14 PM.

Currently keeping:

Ants:    Stigmatomma pallipes

            Temnothorax schaumii - Journal

            Temnothorax curvispinosus

            Myrmecina americana - Journal

            Ponera pennsylvanica - Journal

            Formica incerta Journal

            Formica subsericea

            Formica rubicunda

            Aphaenogaster tennesseensis - Journal

            Aphaenogaster rudis Journal

            Myrmica spp. Journal

            Camponotus chromaiodes - Journal

            Camponotus pennsylvanicus

            Camponotus subbarbatus - Journal

            Camponotus sp.

            Strumigenys pergandei - Journal (Discontinued)

            Strumigenys pilinasis - Journal

            Hypoponera opacior

            Tetramorium immigrans - Journal

            Tapinoma sessile - Journal

            Lasius americanus

            Lasius neoniger

            Lasius murphyi

            Solenopsis molesta

            Pheidole pilifera

 

Other:  Millipedes

Isopods

Springtails

Soil Centipedes (Geophilomorpha sp.)

Stone Centipedes (Lithobius sp.)

Mealworms/Superworms

Indian Mealmoth Culture

Dipluras

Some types of mites


#19 Offline MegaMyrmex - Posted May 2 2018 - 6:48 PM

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Nice journal! I'll try feeding mine crushed springtails as well.
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#20 Offline noebl1 - Posted May 14 2018 - 6:27 AM

noebl1

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Lost mine.  She didn't lay, and eventually looks to have died.  I'll try again this Fall :)







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: ponera, ponera sp., ponera pennsylvanica

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