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Need to move a colony but it was never covered when I bought it

help antkeeping moving colonies tetramorium immigrans

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28 replies to this topic

#1 Offline AntHUB - Posted December 12 2017 - 4:26 PM

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I recently purchased a Tetramorium colony and they were not covered while developing. There is about 50 workers and some brood. The test tube is black with mold and the water is starting to turn yellow, also the water supply is very low. I need help with how to move them to a new tube. the queen and some brood are there but the workers have not moved in.


I am currently keepingTetramorium immigrans (queens: 1)Pseudomyrmex pallidus (Queens: ~10) i Queens in foundingFormica sp.Myrmecocystus sp.lasius neoniger x3Co-owner/ Co-creator/ marketing & graphics manager of AntHUB, an incoming ant appEmail me with questions atjk@uglyorangetruck.com(funny email, I know)


#2 Offline Hunter - Posted December 12 2017 - 4:36 PM

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slightly heat the new tube and cover it with a cloth or towel to make them want it



#3 Offline MegaMyrmex - Posted December 12 2017 - 5:41 PM

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You can cover them for a week or sk and suddenly expose them to light.
Spoiler

#4 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted December 12 2017 - 5:56 PM

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You can pick up the brood with a toothpick coated with a light layer of honey/saliva, and place them into a new tube. Then shake the workers and queen into a baggie. Refrigerate them and shake them into a corner of the ziplock bag. Then tip the contents of that corner into a tube.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#5 Offline AkumaArtist - Posted December 12 2017 - 6:00 PM

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You can pick up the brood with a toothpick coated with a light layer of honey/saliva, and place them into a new tube. Then shake the workers and queen into a baggie. Refrigerate them and shake them into a corner of the ziplock bag. Then tip the contents of that corner into a tube.

I do not recomend to move the brood unless it is vital,because there's a big chance to dammage them and their development

 

---------------------------------

Althought,maybe a drop of honey ,a cover for the new place and an slight aument in the temperature could help you moving htem



#6 Offline T.C. - Posted December 12 2017 - 6:32 PM

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Either use heat or a direct light from a flash light or something similar. Tetramorium seem to be rather sensitive to sudden heat. Last weekend I put a heating pack that I was using in my shoes ( because it was freezing a$$ cold) and on top of their nest. Within 15 minutes a colony of 100+ with brood had moved into the outworld. I took it off and put a light on their outworld. They then moved back into the nest. Both moves occurred within 15 minutes.

#7 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted December 12 2017 - 7:16 PM

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You can pick up the brood with a toothpick coated with a light layer of honey/saliva, and place them into a new tube. Then shake the workers and queen into a baggie. Refrigerate them and shake them into a corner of the ziplock bag. Then tip the contents of that corner into a tube.

I do not recomend to move the brood unless it is vital,because there's a big chance to dammage them and their development

 

---------------------------------

Althought,maybe a drop of honey ,a cover for the new place and an slight aument in the temperature could help you moving htem

 

Maybe its just me. I have REALLY good hand-eye coordination, and I've never lost a single egg with this process. I'm pretty experienced with the art of ant-keeping, anyway (three years, not that long in truth)


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#8 Offline AkumaArtist - Posted December 12 2017 - 10:47 PM

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You can pick up the brood with a toothpick coated with a light layer of honey/saliva, and place them into a new tube. Then shake the workers and queen into a baggie. Refrigerate them and shake them into a corner of the ziplock bag. Then tip the contents of that corner into a tube.

I do not recomend to move the brood unless it is vital,because there's a big chance to dammage them and their development

 

---------------------------------

Althought,maybe a drop of honey ,a cover for the new place and an slight aument in the temperature could help you moving htem

 

Maybe its just me. I have REALLY good hand-eye coordination, and I've never lost a single egg with this process. I'm pretty experienced with the art of ant-keeping, anyway (three years, not that long in truth)

 

Yeah,but I mean,if you aren't too experiencied or good,its very dangerous and you could loose the colony's nurses/workers

It happened to me once



#9 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted December 13 2017 - 4:36 AM

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You can pick up the brood with a toothpick coated with a light layer of honey/saliva, and place them into a new tube. Then shake the workers and queen into a baggie. Refrigerate them and shake them into a corner of the ziplock bag. Then tip the contents of that corner into a tube.

I do not recomend to move the brood unless it is vital,because there's a big chance to dammage them and their development

 

---------------------------------

Althought,maybe a drop of honey ,a cover for the new place and an slight aument in the temperature could help you moving htem

 

Maybe its just me. I have REALLY good hand-eye coordination, and I've never lost a single egg with this process. I'm pretty experienced with the art of ant-keeping, anyway (three years, not that long in truth)

 

Yeah,but I mean,if you aren't too experiencied or good,its very dangerous and you could loose the colony's nurses/workers

It happened to me once

 

Yeah, it's just me. I never lose workers, probably because I put an hour of my time carefully transporting the colony.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#10 Offline Serafine - Posted December 13 2017 - 5:38 AM

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You can pick up the brood with a toothpick coated with a light layer of honey/saliva, and place them into a new tube. Then shake the workers and queen into a baggie. Refrigerate them and shake them into a corner of the ziplock bag. Then tip the contents of that corner into a tube.

That is a terrible idea and most antkeepers will utterly fail when trying this. Also there are species that will go completely berzerk when you try that.

Just put their tube INTO a larger tube (30x200mm test tubes work fine for this), cover the large tube part and wait for them to move. Most likely after a few days you can take out the old tube.


Edited by Serafine, December 13 2017 - 5:39 AM.

We should respect all forms of consciousness. The body is just a vessel, a mere hull.

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#11 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted December 13 2017 - 5:46 AM

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You're right, I guess. My method only works with P. gracilis, Lasius, and Tetramorium (definitely not Camponotus)


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#12 Offline FeedTheAnts - Posted December 13 2017 - 11:41 AM

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Put the tube in direct SUNLIGHT. It has worked for me for even the most stubborn of ants.


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#13 Offline nurbs - Posted December 13 2017 - 8:15 PM

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I have hundreds of colonies. Takes me less than 10 seconds to transfer a large colony from one test tube to another. I should make a video. Might shock some of you. But it works. 


Instagram:

nurbsants

 

YouTube

 

California Ants for Sale

 

Camponotus us-ca02

http://www.formicult...onotus-us-ca02/

 

Pencil Case and Test Tube Formicariums

http://www.formicult...m-and-outworld/

 

Bloodworm Soup

http://www.formicult...bloodworm-soup/


#14 Offline drtrmiller - Posted December 13 2017 - 8:18 PM

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I have hundreds of colonies. Takes me less than 10 seconds to transfer a large colony from one test tube to another. I should make a video. Might shock some of you. But it works.


Looking forward to seeing your mystery technique!


#15 Offline AntHUB - Posted December 17 2017 - 12:36 PM

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I moved them thanks for the techniques, i covered them for around 3 days and moved them into a new tube. also i would love to see your technique Nurbs i am subscribed and it would be so useful.


  • noebl1 likes this

I am currently keepingTetramorium immigrans (queens: 1)Pseudomyrmex pallidus (Queens: ~10) i Queens in foundingFormica sp.Myrmecocystus sp.lasius neoniger x3Co-owner/ Co-creator/ marketing & graphics manager of AntHUB, an incoming ant appEmail me with questions atjk@uglyorangetruck.com(funny email, I know)


#16 Offline nurbs - Posted December 25 2017 - 6:14 PM

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I have hundreds of colonies. Takes me less than 10 seconds to transfer a large colony from one test tube to another. I should make a video. Might shock some of you. But it works.


Looking forward to seeing your mystery technique!

 

 

 

Was feeding and cleaning today, and almost forgot to make a recording. So here it is.

 

 

I know you all have questions.

 

Does this stress out the ants?!

Yes. Probably worse. Apocalypse, the end of the world, all that stuff.

 

Does this kill the ants?
No. I've done this hundreds of times. Things that ants are sensitive to and will kill them are usually scent based - like paints or alcohol. Or poisonous food. Quick jerky movements for a short burst will not harm them.

 

But, BUT! Does this kill the ants?!

No. Not even one worker.

 

What if brood sticks to the test tube?

Moist wet qtip.

 

But, does this kill the ants?

No.

 

I don't want to stress them out!

It's OK. A little bit of stress in life is healthy.

 

Any questions? Class dismissed. 


  • Connectimyrmex and ultraex2 like this

Instagram:

nurbsants

 

YouTube

 

California Ants for Sale

 

Camponotus us-ca02

http://www.formicult...onotus-us-ca02/

 

Pencil Case and Test Tube Formicariums

http://www.formicult...m-and-outworld/

 

Bloodworm Soup

http://www.formicult...bloodworm-soup/


#17 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted December 25 2017 - 6:53 PM

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I have hundreds of colonies. Takes me less than 10 seconds to transfer a large colony from one test tube to another. I should make a video. Might shock some of you. But it works.


Looking forward to seeing your mystery technique!

 

 

 

Was feeding and cleaning today, and almost forgot to make a recording. So here it is.

 

 

I know you all have questions.

 

Does this stress out the ants?!

Yes. Probably worse. Apocalypse, the end of the world, all that stuff.

 

Does this kill the ants?
No. I've done this hundreds of times. Things that ants are sensitive to and will kill them are usually scent based - like paints or alcohol. Or poisonous food. Quick jerky movements for a short burst will not harm them.

 

But, BUT! Does this kill the ants?!

No. Not even one worker.

 

What if brood sticks to the test tube?

Moist wet qtip.

 

But, does this kill the ants?

No.

 

I don't want to stress them out!

It's OK. A little bit of stress in life is healthy.

 

Any questions? Class dismissed. 

 

This is what I do when I run out of toothpicks xD

Your collection is awesome!


Edited by Connectimyrmex, December 25 2017 - 6:54 PM.

Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#18 Offline nurbs - Posted December 25 2017 - 7:04 PM

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This is what I do when I run out of toothpicks xD

Your collection is awesome!

 

 

Thanks. Just uploaded another.

 


  • T.C. likes this

Instagram:

nurbsants

 

YouTube

 

California Ants for Sale

 

Camponotus us-ca02

http://www.formicult...onotus-us-ca02/

 

Pencil Case and Test Tube Formicariums

http://www.formicult...m-and-outworld/

 

Bloodworm Soup

http://www.formicult...bloodworm-soup/


#19 Offline nurbs - Posted December 25 2017 - 7:56 PM

nurbs

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Looking back, the only species not recommended with this method are honeypot repletes. With those, a qtip works great.


Instagram:

nurbsants

 

YouTube

 

California Ants for Sale

 

Camponotus us-ca02

http://www.formicult...onotus-us-ca02/

 

Pencil Case and Test Tube Formicariums

http://www.formicult...m-and-outworld/

 

Bloodworm Soup

http://www.formicult...bloodworm-soup/


#20 Offline Martialis - Posted December 25 2017 - 8:17 PM

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I have hundreds of colonies. Takes me less than 10 seconds to transfer a large colony from one test tube to another. I should make a video. Might shock some of you. But it works.


Looking forward to seeing your mystery technique!

 

 

 

Was feeding and cleaning today, and almost forgot to make a recording. So here it is.

 

 

I know you all have questions.

 

Does this stress out the ants?!

Yes. Probably worse. Apocalypse, the end of the world, all that stuff.

 

Does this kill the ants?
No. I've done this hundreds of times. Things that ants are sensitive to and will kill them are usually scent based - like paints or alcohol. Or poisonous food. Quick jerky movements for a short burst will not harm them.

 

But, BUT! Does this kill the ants?!

No. Not even one worker.

 

What if brood sticks to the test tube?

Moist wet qtip.

 

But, does this kill the ants?

No.

 

I don't want to stress them out!

It's OK. A little bit of stress in life is healthy.

 

Any questions? Class dismissed. 

 

Does this kill the ants?


  • nurbs likes this
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