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Does this look like a Dampwood or a Drywood termite soldier?


Best Answer Ant_Dude2908 , November 27 2017 - 6:12 PM

Dry wood termites! Damp wood termites have very long and straight heads. Where as dry wood termites have heads that are tilted downwards slightly. Go to the full post


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#1 Online Vendayn - Posted November 27 2017 - 5:56 PM

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If need more pictures I'll take more. I might take more anyway, but dad had to use the phone so got cut short. At least got one decent one I think.

 

Location found: In Irvine, Southern California. Sorta nearby is the river, its within flying distance. This particular colony were in a stick (actually not that large, like a medium sized stick that is/was the length of a trash bag) and most of the stick was really rotten and wet. It was easy to break apart. They were under a tree that is shaded 100% of the time, and always moist/wet underneath due to irrigation (even in the Summer). There is NEVER sun in this particular spot because the tree blocks it and the apartment complex trump wall blocks the morning sun from hitting them. Its actually a location that is relatively cool even in the Summer. Around them was tons of rotten wood and subterranean termites, plus Argentine ants.

 

Interesting detail: There were no fecal pellets outside the wood, but inside the wood. I didn't even know there were termites in the stick until I broke it open. I did see it had been eaten up, but I never expected large termites.

 

Size: Well, this won't help much probably. The soldiers are bigger than Drywood termite alates I generally see, but only a bit bigger. At least one of the reproductive nymphs are actually the length of most of the soldiers. She is pretty long

 

They number about 100 I'd say so a really decent sized colony, with some winged alates (not very many, only saw three), a bunch of soldiers (quite a lot actually), and a bunch of false workers and large looking reproductive nymphs. I got the queen and male too. One of the alates was yellowish, others actually look more red like I normally see for Drywood termites. 

 

Also as a side note, the stick was laying directly on the ground. Its possible it fell from above from a larger colony, so I might go back tomorrow and look at the tree branches better.


Edited by Vendayn, November 27 2017 - 6:07 PM.


#2 Online Vendayn - Posted November 27 2017 - 6:05 PM

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Here is another good picture, a bit closer up than the one above (but one above you can see the mandibles better).

 


Edited by Vendayn, November 27 2017 - 6:05 PM.


#3 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted November 27 2017 - 6:12 PM   Best Answer

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Dry wood termites! Damp wood termites have very long and straight heads. Where as dry wood termites have heads that are tilted downwards slightly.

#4 Online Vendayn - Posted November 27 2017 - 6:21 PM

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Dry wood termites! Damp wood termites have very long and straight heads. Where as dry wood termites have heads that are tilted downwards slightly.

Okay awesome. I tried comparing pictures and videos, but it was hard for me to tell. And kept finding random information. I had a feeling they weren't Dampwoods, though in my excitement that is what I thought they were.

 

That is a huge Drywood termite colony then! The stick they were in was kinda small for the amount of termites in the nest. I wonder if there is a huge colony in the tree branches then, hope I can reach them.

 

Actually what threw me off...is originally someone told me on chat at some point that Drywood termites were only a little bigger than Subterranean termites. So I was always confused after that lol.

 

Thanks :)



#5 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted November 27 2017 - 6:24 PM

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No problemo! Also what are the termites for?

#6 Online Vendayn - Posted November 27 2017 - 6:27 PM

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No problemo! Also what are the termites for?

I actually really enjoy watching them. They are easy to keep, and pretty relaxing to watch. They aren't as exciting as ants, but still neat. In many ways they are a lot easier to keep than ants are.

 

But, a lot of people also use them for food for ants, frogs, fish and all kinds of things. Actually doing research, if say a frog is sick and not eating, if it eats termites its actually like medicine to them. The termites also are good for queens that forage in founding stages. As I have immense luck with Pogonomyrmex queens during their founding stages if I have access to termites. It gives them a good head start.


Edited by Vendayn, November 27 2017 - 6:33 PM.


#7 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted November 27 2017 - 6:30 PM

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I read that same thing! But yes, I too have had luck with feeding small colonies termites too.




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