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Connectimyrmex's Reticulitermes flavipes journal

reticulitermes flavipes termites termite thanks ctantkeeper

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11 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted November 27 2017 - 3:33 PM

Connectimyrmex

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Hi!

I recently met up with a friend of mine on this forum (ctantkeeper, he's a great guy). During this meet up, I traded a Bombus impatiens queen for a cute little Reticulitermes colony (three reproductives and nine workers). There seems to be two queens and one male. Most of the workers are at their final molt, with only two showing any age difference. Interestingly, I spotted the classic termite ball fungus growing in the corner of their tube (where the eggs probably were). It's kind of cool to see this harmless little fungus growing in captivity.

I'll do my best to keep this journal updated. Subterranean termites are by far my favorite termites (in fact, my first termites ever were Coptotermes gestroi and Coptotermes formosanus). I hope that I can keep this colony alive.

I'll make sure to post pictures when I get the chance!
 


Edited by Connectimyrmex, November 27 2017 - 3:34 PM.

  • TennesseeAnts likes this
Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#2 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted December 2 2017 - 2:47 PM

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After doing some research, I decided against putting my termites in the sunroom for hibernation. My sunroom has been only a few degrees above freezing, with chances of going even further below. All of my ants and wasps are hibernating there. Apparently, termites don't really hibernate, and often maintain warm temperatures in the nest. I'll probably put them into by garage or basement.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#3 Offline Vendayn - Posted December 2 2017 - 4:12 PM

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Yeah, I'm pretty sure there isn't any termite species that hibernates like ants do. I never read of a termite species that hibernates or anything like that at all about termites. I know even way up north in the snow I've found colonies of termites that are active inside wood. Its probably just isn't a thing they do. So, that is probably a good idea to avoid "hibernating" them as that probably more likely kill them than anything else. 

 

Granted with that said...there is a semi-hibernation period for certain termites. Drywood termites will "hibernate" for about a year before laying eggs and then finally lay eggs. But as far as I know, that only happens during the initial founding stages.



#4 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted December 2 2017 - 6:50 PM

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Sounds like my termites are on an "egg hibernation" streak as well. I got them without eggs, and they've refused to lay. Seems like the queens are getting ready to lay again (I think there are two, maybe even all three are queens, cuz parthenogenesis).


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#5 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted December 7 2017 - 9:37 AM

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One of the termite reproductives was mating with another one of the reproductives this morning, so I know that there is at least one king and one queen.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#6 Offline ctantkeeper - Posted December 7 2017 - 11:32 AM

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Hi!

I recently met up with a friend of mine on this forum (ctantkeeper, he's a great guy). During this meet up, I traded a Bombus impatiens queen for a cute little Reticulitermes colony (three reproductives and nine workers). There seems to be two queens and one male. Most of the workers are at their final molt, with only two showing any age difference. Interestingly, I spotted the classic termite ball fungus growing in the corner of their tube (where the eggs probably were). It's kind of cool to see this harmless little fungus growing in captivity.

I'll do my best to keep this journal updated. Subterranean termites are by far my favorite termites (in fact, my first termites ever were Coptotermes gestroi and Coptotermes formosanus). I hope that I can keep this colony alive.

I'll make sure to post pictures when I get the chance!
 

I actually haven't seen this thread until now. 

 

Aww, thanks :) :) :). It was awesome meeting you too. We should totally get together some more when it gets warmer. I know of some amazing hiking spots. Glad to hear that the termites are doing well. I saw you post about the mating event (I'm 90% sure that the colony has two queens and one king in total). As for the fungus though, I would be a bit weary of that. I don't recall there being any mold when I gave it to you. Remember, these are not a fungus-farming species of termite. I would remove the mold if I were in your position.

 

All of my R. flavipes colonies have taken a break from egg laying as well. They should resume in early-mid spring.


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#7 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted December 7 2017 - 12:02 PM

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I'd love to meet with you again! 

The fungus is called "termite balls" and is a harmless species of egg-mimicking fungus. The workers love to carry them around. My wild "semi-colony" has termite balls as well. They mimic the smell and shape of termite eggs.


  • ctantkeeper likes this
Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#8 Offline ctantkeeper - Posted December 7 2017 - 5:17 PM

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I'd love to meet with you again! 

The fungus is called "termite balls" and is a harmless species of egg-mimicking fungus. The workers love to carry them around. My wild "semi-colony" has termite balls as well. They mimic the smell and shape of termite eggs.

Oh, cool. I've heard of those before, but have unfortunately never seen them in person :(



#9 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted December 8 2017 - 5:43 AM

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I can give you some in the future :)

 

They're not doing too well, probably due to lack of eggs (eggs strengthen the fungus's likelihood of thriving). There might be more when they resume!


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#10 Offline MegaMyrmex - Posted December 9 2017 - 3:13 PM

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Man, those are some nice looking termites! Do you know when termite alates fly and how to identify them? I see lots of clusters of what I think are termite dealates(does this term also work for termites? :thinking:). They were all glossy black and I found them at a beach whenever I turned over a piece of wood or log. 


Current colonies-

 

- 2 Camponotus chromaoides

- 1 Aphaenogaster sp. colony

- 1 Crematogaster colony

- 1 Strumigenys colony :yahoo:  :dance:  :dance2: 

 

Species checklist(ants found so far)-

- Aphaenogaster teneseensis

- Aphaenogaster picea

- Aphaenogaster sp.

- Brachymyrmex patagonicus

- Camponotus castaneus

- Camponotus chromaoides

- Camponotus nearcticus

- Camponotus pennsylvanicus

- Camponotus subbarbatus

- Colobopsis impressus(dead queen... :*(

- Crematogaster sp.

- Formica pallidefulva

- Formica sanguinea

- Formica subsericea

- Hypoponera sp.

- Lasius claviger

- Lasius umbratus

- Lasius neoniger

- Lasius sp.

- Monomorium minimum

- Myrmica sp.

- Nylanderia flavipes

- Pheidole morrisi

- Pheidole bicarinata

- Pheidole dentata(all pheidole found were workers only :( )

- Ponera pennsylvanica

- Prenolepis imparis

- Strumigenys rostrata

‚Äč- Stigmatomma pallipes :dance2:  :dance:

- Tetramorium immigrans

- Tapinoma sessile

 

Queens/colonies to Look for-

- Pheidole

- Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

- Polyergus

- Dolichoderus

- Myrmica

- Stigmatomma pallipes


#11 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted December 19 2017 - 9:41 AM

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They fly during the spring, and they look like skinny, tiny cockroaches with VERY LONG, glossy wings. They're impossible to miss in untreated areas.

 

Seems like your dealate species is R. flavipes. They are tiny and black, even smaller than Cryptotermes dealates and the soldiers of their own species. I'd ask CTantkeeper for some more info, he collected the termite colony that I have.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#12 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted May 9 2018 - 2:35 PM

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Here's an update!

Sadly, the original colony died from a mold/fungus outbreak. However, I did manage to collect a large amount of workers and alates. I managed to successfully pair the termite alates, and I made a small colony with one pair, some workers and soldiers, some termite eggs, and one nymph. So far, they are doing great!


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: reticulitermes, flavipes, termites, termite, thanks ctantkeeper

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