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WA state mid June queen ID


Best Answer Cameron C. Thomas , November 28 2017 - 6:38 AM

From your description, Camponotus novaeboracensis sounds reasonable. It may also be Cherculeanus, which is a closely related species and also commonly occurs here. In fact, C. novaeboracensis was recorded as a subspecies of C. herculeanus in the early 20th century until Creighton separated them. For someone on here to give you an ID, you'll want to include good pictures. If you can get closeups of your workers (post-nanitics), you could key them out yourself. Creighton (1950)--cited below--is still the best key for your potential species and is publicly available.

 

Creighton, WS (1950) The ants of North America. ​Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology 104.

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#1 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted November 24 2017 - 7:26 PM

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Color:Shiny black with red blotches on each side
Length:13-14 millimeters
Location of collection:In a forest in western washington
Nest description:N/A
Worker description:Same as queen but no red blotches
Worker size:Around 7-8 millimeters


Any help is appreciated!

Edit: pics coming soon! :)


Edited by Ant_Dude2908, November 25 2017 - 12:21 PM.


#2 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted November 25 2017 - 8:52 PM

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So, more looking at them in bright light yeilds, the queen has the same patterns as a C. Noveaboricensis queen,  just much darker. Same for the workers too. So, is it possible for her to be a very dark Camponotus Noveaboricensis? :thinking:


Edited by Ant_Dude2908, November 25 2017 - 8:53 PM.


#3 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted November 27 2017 - 6:27 PM

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Does anyone have a good idea?

#4 Offline Cameron C. Thomas - Posted November 28 2017 - 6:38 AM   Best Answer

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From your description, Camponotus novaeboracensis sounds reasonable. It may also be Cherculeanus, which is a closely related species and also commonly occurs here. In fact, C. novaeboracensis was recorded as a subspecies of C. herculeanus in the early 20th century until Creighton separated them. For someone on here to give you an ID, you'll want to include good pictures. If you can get closeups of your workers (post-nanitics), you could key them out yourself. Creighton (1950)--cited below--is still the best key for your potential species and is publicly available.

 

Creighton, WS (1950) The ants of North America. ​Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology 104.


Edited by Cameron C. Thomas, November 28 2017 - 6:39 AM.

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#5 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted November 28 2017 - 4:05 PM

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That looks right. Thanks! (y)  :yahoo:  :warning:  :yes:



#6 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted November 28 2017 - 5:21 PM

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They are all nanitics right now, but maybe in February!

#7 Offline Hunter - Posted November 29 2017 - 7:27 AM

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your camp do the workers or queen have red upper back legs, or is the  just red abdomen


#8 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted November 29 2017 - 4:40 PM

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Yes they have red legs. And it is thorax that has the red.

#9 Offline Hunter - Posted November 29 2017 - 5:24 PM

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most likely  Cherculeanus then



#10 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted December 6 2017 - 7:02 PM

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So, these turned out to be C. Herculeanus!
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