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Integrative taxonomy delimits cryptic species in the Tetramorium caespitum complex


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#1 Offline MrILoveTheAnts - Posted October 31 2017 - 2:06 PM

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https://myrmecologic....pdf&format=raw

 

Long story short: Tetramorium caespitum aka species E in North America is now called Tetramorium immigrans. The brief description of this species is on page 120 - 121 of the study linked to above.


Edited by MrILoveTheAnts, October 31 2017 - 2:11 PM.

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#2 Offline gcsnelling - Posted October 31 2017 - 2:33 PM

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About flippin time.


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#3 Offline VoidElecent - Posted October 31 2017 - 4:00 PM

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That's awesome. Does this make every pavement ant in the U.S. Tetramorium immigrans?


Edited by VoidElecent, October 31 2017 - 4:04 PM.


#4 Offline FeedTheAnts - Posted October 31 2017 - 4:35 PM

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I love that name. Rolls off the tongue real well, that is how those Myrmecologists come up with a name... right?

The name of his post hurts my brain.... read this Should the forum rules be changed to require thread titles to precisely and adequately describe the question or topic being discussed? - Forum Support, Feedback & Suggestions - Ants & Myrmecology Forum

:P


Edited by TennesseeAnts, October 31 2017 - 5:09 PM.

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#5 Offline MrILoveTheAnts - Posted October 31 2017 - 5:38 PM

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That's awesome. Does this make every pavement ant in the U.S. Tetramorium immigrans?

 
Not every one no. There's still Tetramorium tsushimae to confuse things. And then the native ones but they're mostly in the south west.
 
Non-native species
Tetramorium immigrans (formerly caespitum, species E.) 
Tetramorium tsushimae
Tetramorium atratulus (formerly Anergates) an inquilin parasite of T. immigrans now.
 
Native Species (I think)
Tetramorium bicarinatum                                                        
Tetramorium caldarium                                                           
Tetramorium hispidum                                                            
Tetramorium insolens                                                           
Tetramorium lanuginosum                                                       
Tetramorium pacificum                                                          
Tetramorium simillimum                                                         
Tetramorium spinosum                                                           
Tetramorium tonganum                                                           


#6 Offline VoidElecent - Posted October 31 2017 - 7:03 PM

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Ah, I see. My question was poorly phrased.

 

I'm aware of native speies such as BMM's T. tsushimae and Aaron's T. bicarinatum. Are there any non-native T. caespitum populations in the U.S., or are they all differentiated enough to be consider T. immigrans?



#7 Offline Aaron567 - Posted October 31 2017 - 7:21 PM

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I am pretty sure the only native Tetramorium in North America are T. hispidum and T. spinosum. The rest are all invasives from Africa and Asia with the exception of Sp. E/immigrans.



#8 Offline Chicken_eater100 - Posted October 31 2017 - 7:23 PM

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i feel like ants and avics are getting hate by taxonomist.  



#9 Offline MrILoveTheAnts - Posted October 31 2017 - 7:39 PM

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I am pretty sure the only native Tetramorium in North America are T. hispidum and T. spinosum. The rest are all invasives from Africa and Asia with the exception of Sp. E/immigrans.

I'll look into it tomorrow. To be honest I've never been certain of the native status to a lot of the ants I find. Outside Tetramorium I'm sure most (all?) Nylanderia are nonnative tramp species.

 

Ah, I see. My question was poorly phrased.

 

I'm aware of native speies such as BMM's T. tsushimae and Aaron's T. bicarinatum. Are there any non-native T. caespitum populations in the U.S., or are they all differentiated enough to be consider T. immigrans?

Within the T. caespitum complex, T. immigrans is the only one listed to occur within the US and Canada. (I don't know if T. tsushimae is within this complex.)



#10 Offline Martialis - Posted November 1 2017 - 4:04 AM

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Pretty cool if you ask me!

 

T. tsushimae is actually invasive, just as T. caesptium used to be considered here, until this document.


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#11 Offline BMM - Posted November 1 2017 - 4:11 AM

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Neat. With as long as they've been around without an official species name, it felt like it would never happen.



#12 Offline Martialis - Posted November 1 2017 - 4:39 AM

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Here's a graphic from the article:

 

med_gallery_1053_1041_854409.png

 

It's no surprise that T. immigrans invaded, they've got a pretty wide distribution!


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#13 Offline FeedTheAnts - Posted November 1 2017 - 6:35 AM

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I had no idea there were so many species of Tetramorium :o


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#14 Offline gcsnelling - Posted November 1 2017 - 2:25 PM

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It is a huge genus.


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#15 Offline Aaron567 - Posted November 1 2017 - 2:29 PM

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Yeah, 5th largest genus in the ant world I think


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#16 Offline Nathant2131 - Posted November 1 2017 - 3:56 PM

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I've waited for this for a looooooooong time.

 

So, are they non-native or not?


Edited by Nathant2131, November 1 2017 - 3:58 PM.


#17 Offline MrILoveTheAnts - Posted November 1 2017 - 5:25 PM

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Native to:
Tetramorium immigrans - Europe, south Asia
Tetramorium atratulus inquilin parasite of T. immigrans so likely the same distribution.
Tetramorium tsushimae - Japan, south Asia
Tetramorium bicarinatum - Australia                                                     
Tetramorium caldarium - Africa                                                         
Tetramorium hispidum - Native to US and likely northern Mexico.                                                           
Tetramorium insolens - Australia                                                         
Tetramorium lanuginosum - Africa, south Asia, Australia                                                     
Tetramorium pacificum - Australia                                                        
Tetramorium simillimum - Africa, south Asia, Australia                                                       
Tetramorium spinosum - Native to US and northern Mexico.             
Tetramorium tonganum - Asia, Australia       
 
I haven't checked the species in the study yet. Presumably they're all native to Europe and various Asian countries. Their distributions are listed in the study but I don't think it says where they originated.           

Edited by MrILoveTheAnts, November 1 2017 - 5:26 PM.


#18 Offline Reevak - Posted November 1 2017 - 6:55 PM

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I like it. I don't know why this news made me so happy.

Edited by Reevak, November 1 2017 - 8:09 PM.


#19 Offline Martialis - Posted November 2 2017 - 7:16 AM

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I've waited for this for a looooooooong time.

 

So, are they non-native or not?

I think they're invasive.  

 

It looks like most of these have been recorded in Croatia...

 

good luck identifying them there.


Edited by Martialis, November 2 2017 - 7:19 AM.

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#20 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted November 3 2017 - 6:53 AM

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Wait, does this mean that both T. caespitum and Tetramorium sp.E are being renamed, or just sp. E?






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