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Large Yellow Worker IDs


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14 replies to this topic

#1 Offline KalenH - Posted October 12 2017 - 10:54 AM

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Hi all, 

 

I'm wanting to earn my first correct ID. Finally found something that I know isn't S invictus. They're big so I guessed they're camponotus. The only camponotus I see with this color pattern is: http://www.antwiki.o...notus_castaneus

 

Did I get it right?

 

1. Location (on a map) of collection: South Atlanta, Georgia
2. Date of collection: Seen on 10/12/17
3. Habitat of collection: Parking lot island,  near 10 foot grass barrier and then forest. 
4. Length (from head to gaster): I'm not good at guessing this, the pictures have pinestraw for size reference. 
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture: Yellow, slightly translucent, solid in color.
6. Distinguishing characteristics: Large, uniform in size, appears bright yellow in the sun. 
7. Distinguishing behavior: Very fast and erratic movement. They appeared to be moving individually any not communicating. I put my foot on the edge of the pavement while i was spectating them and when i lift my foot the they had accumulated under my shoe and scattered with the light. 

9. Nuptial flight time and date: N/A, this is an established colony. I would guess that there were approximately 40-70 workers visible. 

[Images of ant]

https://imgur.com/a/Jm5Ze

https://imgur.com/a/Z76Ui
 
[Images of nest]

I think they live in this rotted root system. I see thin caked dirt walls filling the grabs vertically between the elevated roots and the dirt.
https://imgur.com/a/IyYAW

 

 



#2 Offline T.C. - Posted October 12 2017 - 11:28 AM

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MAYBE Formica sp. ?

#3 Offline MrILoveTheAnts - Posted October 12 2017 - 11:37 AM

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Looks like Camponotus castaneus.


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#4 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted October 12 2017 - 8:43 PM

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Yup, I'm 90% sure that they are Camponotus castaneus.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

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#5 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted October 13 2017 - 10:54 AM

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Difficult to tell with the photographs from one angle and zero measurements, but it looks more like a Formica sp. from the pallidefulva group to me.


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If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

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#6 Offline Runner12 - Posted October 13 2017 - 11:47 AM

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Looks more like F. pallidefulva to me too. C.castaneus nests are usually not that conspicuous either.

#7 Offline KalenH - Posted October 13 2017 - 1:51 PM

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Okay, so I need to go back and catch a side profile and look at the thorax shape like this link describes? 

http://www.myrmecos....and-camponotus/

 

Looking at the top down i'm expecting to get be formica when I go back to look.



#8 Offline MrILoveTheAnts - Posted October 13 2017 - 4:50 PM

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Difficult to tell with the photographs from one angle and zero measurements, but it looks more like a Formica sp. from the pallidefulva group to me.

 

Oh shoot you're right. I missed the two arched mesososma. If it's not Formica pallidefulva itself then it could be Formica biophilica.



#9 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted October 13 2017 - 4:51 PM

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Oh yeah, I didn't see the double camel humps. The angle was tricky. She's formica.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#10 Offline T.C. - Posted October 13 2017 - 6:36 PM

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Difficult to tell with the photographs from one angle and zero measurements, but it looks more like a Formica sp. from the pallidefulva group to me.


Oh shoot you're right. I missed the two arched mesososma. If it's not Formica pallidefulva itself then it could be Formica biophilica.
Haha, when you said camponotous after i said formica, I was so confused. Certainly wasn't going to argue ID's with you. :)

Edited by T.C., October 13 2017 - 6:37 PM.


#11 Offline KalenH - Posted October 13 2017 - 9:30 PM

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Difficult to tell with the photographs from one angle and zero measurements, but it looks more like a Formica sp. from the pallidefulva group to me.


Oh shoot you're right. I missed the two arched mesososma. If it's not Formica pallidefulva itself then it could be Formica biophilica.
Haha, when you said camponotous after i said formica, I was so confused. Certainly wasn't going to argue ID's with you. :)

 

Reading through the ID threads, I wish that people would throw in an additional sentence to explain why they provide the answers they do. I'd love to know what the obvious differential traits are that people default to. 



#12 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted October 14 2017 - 6:19 AM

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Difficult to tell with the photographs from one angle and zero measurements, but it looks more like a Formica sp. from the pallidefulva group to me.


Oh shoot you're right. I missed the two arched mesososma. If it's not Formica pallidefulva itself then it could be Formica biophilica.
Haha, when you said camponotous after i said formica, I was so confused. Certainly wasn't going to argue ID's with you. :)

 

Reading through the ID threads, I wish that people would throw in an additional sentence to explain why they provide the answers they do. I'd love to know what the obvious differential traits are that people default to. 

 

I identify Camponotus by the head shape and the single camel hump. When I looked at the above photo, I thought it was a single hump.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#13 Offline MrILoveTheAnts - Posted October 14 2017 - 6:46 PM

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Difficult to tell with the photographs from one angle and zero measurements, but it looks more like a Formica sp. from the pallidefulva group to me.


Oh shoot you're right. I missed the two arched mesososma. If it's not Formica pallidefulva itself then it could be Formica biophilica.
Haha, when you said camponotous after i said formica, I was so confused. Certainly wasn't going to argue ID's with you. :)

 

Argue away. Batspiderfish tends to better at identifications than me.



#14 Offline T.C. - Posted October 14 2017 - 6:52 PM

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Difficult to tell with the photographs from one angle and zero measurements, but it looks more like a Formica sp. from the pallidefulva group to me.

Oh shoot you're right. I missed the two arched mesososma. If it's not Formica pallidefulva itself then it could be Formica biophilica.
Haha, when you said camponotous after i said formica, I was so confused. Certainly wasn't going to argue ID's with you. :)
Argue away. Batspiderfish tends to better at identifications than me.
Haha, well me and your experience levels are quite distant. And with experience comes knowledge.

Eh, even the pro's make mistakes.

Edited by T.C., October 14 2017 - 6:53 PM.


#15 Offline LC3 - Posted October 14 2017 - 8:54 PM

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Reading through the ID threads, I wish that people would throw in an additional sentence to explain why they provide the answers they do. I'd love to know what the obvious differential traits are that people default to. 

 

Here's a quick summary with Camponotus and Formica.

Formica typically have a triangular head while Camponotus has a heart shaped head for majors, and an oval head for minor workers, the head width usually is the same width as the mesosoma or wider. Eye placement differs with Formica having eyes near the corner/more back of the head while 

 

Camponotus have smaller and more centered eyes. On their mesosoma Formica have two nodes, like many other ants. Camponotini (Includes Camponotus, Polyrhachis, Colobopsis, Dinomyrmex, maybesomemoregenresimnotawareof) on the other hand have a smooth convex/arched mesosoma.

 

The gaster of Camponotus queens are an elongated oval shape while Formica have a rounded pointier gaster (typical to that of other Formacines). The gasters of Camponotus workers also tend to be smaller in ratio to body size compared to Formica.

 

Formica are also well known for their highly erratic movement, darting and stopping for extended periods of time. Also chances are if you find a mound made out of thatched pine needles, small twigs and grass it's a Formica mound.


Edited by LC3, October 14 2017 - 8:57 PM.

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