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Fungus ID


Best Answer Batspiderfish , October 4 2017 - 2:53 PM

You can't really identify fungi without a microscope and sometimes chemical testing. As just a guess, this looks like something that consumed the queen after she had become weakened or had died for other reasons.

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3 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Aquaexploder - Posted October 4 2017 - 1:13 PM

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I found a tetramorium queen on September First and thought, "Hey that's weird" so I decided to keep her. She seemed fine, even laid what I thought was eggs. When I checked on her 2 weeks later she was dead and it looked like this fungus explode inside her and was starting to come out. It was even coming out of her gaster! I am just curious on what it is.

Pictures:Tetramorium Fungus https://imgur.com/a/Q64FY

Edited by Aquaexploder, October 4 2017 - 1:13 PM.

Founding:

Camponotus nearcticus (x1)

Tetramorium Sp E. (x3)

Prenolepis imparis (x3)

Myrmica (Unknown) (x1)

Temnothorax (x1)

#2 Offline Nathant2131 - Posted October 4 2017 - 1:46 PM

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Some of my dead queens have done that.


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#3 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted October 4 2017 - 2:53 PM   Best Answer

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You can't really identify fungi without a microscope and sometimes chemical testing. As just a guess, this looks like something that consumed the queen after she had become weakened or had died for other reasons.


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If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

----

Black lives still matter.


#4 Offline MegaMyrmex - Posted October 8 2017 - 3:36 PM

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Ay, Batspiderfish is right, this happened when some of my crematogaster queens died during hibernation

Current colonies-

 

- 2 Camponotus chromaoides(1 colony has 4 workers, other 1 worker) 

- 1 Tetramorium immigrans colony(7 workers)

- 1 Aphaenogaster sp. queen(founding colony)

- 2 Lasius claviger queens with host workers. They don't seem to be doing well and workers are dying off :( 

- And a whole lot of Crematogaster queens

 

Species checklist(ants found so far)-

- Aphaenogaster teneseensis

- Aphaenogaster picea

- Aphaenogaster sp.

- Brachymyrmex patagonicus

- Camponotus castaneus

- Camponotus chromaoides

- Camponotus nearcticus

- Camponotus pennsylvanicus

- Camponotus subbarbatus

- Colobopsis impressus(dead queen... :*(

- Crematogaster sp.

- Formica pallidefulva

- Formica sanguinea

- Formica subsericea

- Hypoponera sp.

- Lasius claviger

- Lasius umbratus

- Lasius neoniger

- Lasius sp.

- Monomorium minimum

- Myrmica sp.

- Nylanderia flavipes

- Pheidole morrisi

- Pheidole bicarinata

- Pheidole dentata(all pheidole found were workers only :( )

- Ponera pennsylvanica

- Prenolepis imparis

- Strumigenys rostrate

‚Äč- Stigmatomma pallipes :dance2:  :dance: 

- Tetramorium immigrans

- Tapinoma sessile

 

Queens/colonies to Look for-

- Pheidole

- Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

- Polyergus

- Dolichoderus

- Myrmica

- Stigmatomma pallipes





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