Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  



Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use, and contain no ads for members. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo
- - - - -

Red Queen from Merritt, British Columbia, Canada (2017-09-25)

ant queen queen ant id request

Best Answer VoidElecent , September 26 2017 - 1:07 PM

 

Queen #66 looks like Manica, and Queen #73 is Myrmica.

Thanks for the info on the Genus.  Would you happen to know what species they are or how I can help you determine the sp? (better close-ups of certain parts)

 

 

If it's Manica, it would either be M. hunteri or M. invidia; you'd have to refer to someone else for a more accurate identification.

 

Myrmica, on the other hand, are notoriously difficult to ID and you'd need some pretty intense magnification.

Go to the full post


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Offline proto - Posted September 26 2017 - 2:20 AM

proto

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • LocationVancouver, British Columbia, Canada
I was wandering around a gravel area and beyond this area is fields of long tall yellow wheat grass.
 
SPECIES 1 QUEEN ANT #66
1. Location of Collection: Merritt, British Columbia (Coordinates: 50.087869, -120.746469)
2. Date of Collection: 2017-09-25
3. Habitat of Collection: gravel patch outside a visitor center (https://goo.gl/maps/Yw3CVXNuVtG2).
4. Length:  9mm
5. Coloration: mostly brown/reddish color.
6. Distinguishing characteristics: 12 antennae segments, petiole and post-petiole nodes present, lots of fine hairs on thorax
7. Distinguishing behavior: 
 
 
SPECIES 2 QUEEN ANT #73
1. Location of Collection: Merritt, British Columbia (Coordinates: 50.087869, -120.746469)
2. Date of Collection: 2017-09-25
3. Habitat of Collection: gravel patch outside a visitor center (https://goo.gl/maps/Yw3CVXNuVtG2).
4. Length:  7-8mm
5. Coloration: black with light brown extremities.
6. Distinguishing characteristics: 12 antennae segments, petiole and post-petiole nodes present, two points at the end of the thorax, lots of fine hairs
7. Distinguishing behavior: 
 

I'm new to this as of May 2017 and I'd have to say that this site is such an amazing resource. Having pros helping to ID ants is incredible and super helpful.  I will be applying to GAN Project for Vancouver (lower mainland) once I have some worker colonies as per Ants Canada.

  • Formica podzolica (12)
  • Lasius alienus (33)
  • Myrmica sp. (3)

#2 Offline VoidElecent - Posted September 26 2017 - 7:21 AM

VoidElecent

    Vendor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,132 posts
  • LocationPhiladelphia, PA.

Queen #66 looks like Manica, and Queen #73 is Myrmica.



#3 Offline Nathant2131 - Posted September 26 2017 - 10:21 AM

Nathant2131

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,490 posts
  • LocationDracut, Massachusetts
The second queen looks more like Myrmecina to me.

#4 Offline VoidElecent - Posted September 26 2017 - 11:33 AM

VoidElecent

    Vendor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,132 posts
  • LocationPhiladelphia, PA.

The second queen looks more like Myrmecina to me.

 

Myrmecina would be around 3 or 4 millimeters.



#5 Offline proto - Posted September 26 2017 - 1:04 PM

proto

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • LocationVancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Queen #66 looks like Manica, and Queen #73 is Myrmica.

Thanks for the info on the Genus.  Would you happen to know what species they are or how I can help you determine the sp? (better close-ups of certain parts)


I'm new to this as of May 2017 and I'd have to say that this site is such an amazing resource. Having pros helping to ID ants is incredible and super helpful.  I will be applying to GAN Project for Vancouver (lower mainland) once I have some worker colonies as per Ants Canada.

  • Formica podzolica (12)
  • Lasius alienus (33)
  • Myrmica sp. (3)

#6 Offline VoidElecent - Posted September 26 2017 - 1:07 PM   Best Answer

VoidElecent

    Vendor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,132 posts
  • LocationPhiladelphia, PA.

 

Queen #66 looks like Manica, and Queen #73 is Myrmica.

Thanks for the info on the Genus.  Would you happen to know what species they are or how I can help you determine the sp? (better close-ups of certain parts)

 

 

If it's Manica, it would either be M. hunteri or M. invidia; you'd have to refer to someone else for a more accurate identification.

 

Myrmica, on the other hand, are notoriously difficult to ID and you'd need some pretty intense magnification.


  • proto likes this

#7 Offline LC3 - Posted September 26 2017 - 10:34 PM

LC3

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,304 posts
  • LocationRichmond, BC, Canada

Like stated above the first one is definitely Manica, and the second one Myrmica.

 

Only way to tell if it is M. invidia or M. hunteri is by looking at the petiole node, in M. hunteri there is a spike like thing that juts out pointing towards the main body underneath it.  The pictures are great but conveniently omit a side view of the petiole :P

 

For the Myrmica the size would lead me to believe it is M. incompleta, but I'm not sure if their range extends that far north or inland. Myrmica crassirugis and easily mistakened M. lobifrons and M. latifrons are what I would wager with. Other possibilities are Myrmica alaskensis and Myrmica nearctica, both which I believe are pretty small (Workers ~3.5mm). I don't know the exact size of any of the castes in the above mentioned Myrmica besides M. incompleta (Queens range from 5.5-7mm). If you can get a good shot of the face that might help. 


Edited by LC3, September 26 2017 - 11:12 PM.

Colonies

Spoiler

 

 


#8 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted September 27 2017 - 8:35 AM

Batspiderfish

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,614 posts
  • LocationMaine

We need to use specific morphological features other than size to identify Myrmica. You generally need a microscope to do it properly.


  • VoidElecent likes this

If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

----

Black lives still matter.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: ant queen, queen ant, id request

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users