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#1 Online LC3 - Posted September 18 2017 - 8:10 PM

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Currently I'm keeping 3 species of termites, Reticulitermes cf. hesperus (Western subterranean termite), Zootermopsis angusticollis (Western dampwood termite) and an unidentified (possibly undocumented) dry wood termite, I think it's an Incisitermes sp.

Both the Z. angusticollis and R. cf. hesperus are from Vancouver island, south of Victoria in some forests in Metchosin.
The unknown termite species are from the dyke (coast of this island) and collected during a swarm.

 

[September 18th] Zootermopsis angusticollis:


September 6th

September 16th

September 16th


The colony originally had 5 soldiers, and a soldier nymph as well as a bunch of larvae (nymphs), but I accidentally drowned a lot of them. Anyways one soldier was left but it was eaten by the workers. Anyways a bunch of sticks allocated in a container won't be sufficient.

After arriving home the dampwoods on here were swarming sometime from 9PM to 11PM. Spent 3 hours camping my porch light, I ended up with 11 alates. I put these in a tube of moist wood (all of them) after they wouldn't tandem run and form their own pairs. Long story short, the extra guy was left to die, all the others formed pairs and everyone fought to the death, one pair was left standing.

They haven't grown as it will take at least 2 months for any eggs to hatch into nymphs, and termites are pretty aware of how much resources they have so it's unlikely they will even lay more eggs.
 

September 6th, dead bodies = mold

During this time they've laid 4 eggs


September 16th, about a few days ago they've cleared out a lot of mold, not sure how or what happened to said mold but they aren't dead so it's fine. If I remember correctly sometimes drampwoods will eat mold infested wood because it's easier and provides more nutrients.

September 16th, they've laid something around 6 eggs so far. Give them 6 months and they should hatch into larvae (nymphs)



[September 18th] Reticulitermes cf. hesperus:

Now onto Subterranean termites. These termites are a fragment of a larger termite colony. I believe this termite species is Reticulitermes hesperus. The Western Subterranean Termite

I gathered a couple of dozen workers, around 5 soldiers, and a bunch of nymphs/secondary reproductives. A lot died on the way and more then half of the ones I collected have died.

As of now they have 2 soldiers (molted from workers), most of the nymphs/secondary reproductives are ok, and the colony has produced a secondary reproductive, at least a female.
 

September 16th.

Their setup is pretty much a bunch of sticks and dirt. as long as they have wood and dirt they're good.


September 16th

Probably shouldn't have busted the nest open, but I needed a soldier. It died later for some reason not sure why. They're really fragile.


September 16th

This is a soldier. Notice on the second image that node on the top front end of the head capsule. I'm not sure what this node is for, maybe it's used to store a gland, I'm not sure.
It's possible the node is used for phragmosis, although most Reticulitermes spp. (and mandibular termites by far) use their heads for this purpose. Reticulitermes tilts its head 45 degrees and aligning the upward pointing mandibles nearly parallel to the ground. As of now I think the node serving as a pragmatic device is the most likely. This node seems to be pretty evident on R. hesperus, not so much on some other species like R. flavipes.
 

September 16th.

Secondary reproductive, this one is probably an adultoid neotenic

Spoiler


 

[September 18th] drywood cf. Incisitermes. (Termite sp1.)


September 16th. As of currently 2 inside the tube of wood are dead, the two in the bean snap-on container are doing pretty good.


I'm planning to go out to look for more or any evidence of drywoods from where I found them. Due to the fact that it's a wildlife protection zone I probably won't be very successful.

 

The wings of said species. These probably aren't a set, a lot of them ended up being chewed up.


Cryptotermes brevis (Indian powder dust termite)


Kalotermes approximatus lots of wing veins, pretty thick top wing veins (Not sure what they're called)


Incisitermes minor wing.


Termite sp1.



Incisitermes wing specimen from above.

A: median wing veins,
B: End of top wing veins
C: Cross veins. Net like veins covering top part of wing.
D: 2nd median wing vein splits to many wing veins lining the underside of the wing and back half. (Some veins descend from top wing veins at the end of wing)
 

Termite sp1.

A : Single median wing vein
B: Top wing vein curves around the wing.
C: Median wing vein splits to merge with another vein from the lower top vein, forming a triangle and bending downwards.
D: Very shallow cross veins.
E: Triangle formed from median wing vein and extension from top wing vein
F: Single median wing vein splits into many wing veins with net like structure for lower half of wing.
G: Heavily netted top upper half of wing.


I'm not able to find detailed images of I. minor wings, a lot of wings attributed to I.minor or drywoods are either not specified or not good enough to distinguish detail.
 

This is a very detailed drawing of I. snyderi wing I found on the Mississippi Entomological Museum website. Looks a lot like I. minor wing (two median wing vein, top wing veins end abruptly, many veins splitting off from the lower median wing)


Anyways as shown above the termite wing of Termite sp1. lacks a median vien that seems to be found in other drywoods. Compared to I. minor the wing is also much more netted, as there are many veins connecting the bottom veins diverging from the median vein. The top netted part of the wing above the median vein is larger then what's typical of drywoods. The median wing vein of Termite sp1. nearly stretches over the entire wing. Top cross veins are pretty typical, but the top veins of this species tends to curve and thicken around the edges as opposed to the abrupt ending before the curvature shown by Incisitermes spp.

Really the entire thing looks more like the morphology of a dampwood termite wing, but damp wood wings tend to be very thin, larger, lighter and contain less veins.


Edited by LC3, January 15 2018 - 4:48 PM.

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#2 Online LC3 - Posted September 18 2017 - 8:55 PM

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Wing of Z. angusticollis beside fecal pellets of Termite sp1.

fecal pellets of Termite sp1 are cone shaped, dry and hexagonal compared to Zootermopsis which produced cylindrical wet pellets.

 

Anyways feel free to help on my investigation thingee.

 

Here take this video of Zootermopsis angusticollis nymph or worker molting in case you're not bored enough.

 

Spoiler

Edited by LC3, September 18 2017 - 8:59 PM.

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#3 Offline Studio - Posted September 19 2017 - 3:08 PM

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Very interesting, I like the videos, pictures and details. Keep up posted!

 

I've kept a pair of drywood termites before in a testube setup. They laid 1 egg and and it took a year for them to have 1 worker. I figured it wasn't for me and donated them.



#4 Online LC3 - Posted September 19 2017 - 10:31 PM

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[September/19/2017]

I went to the dyke, damaged an ecosystem, technically didn't break the law I think and got some useful data.

Turns out that these might actually be a dampwood termite or at least a termite that nests in dampwood. I'm not sure.



September/19/2017

Side by side comparison of the workers. Even though most of the termite sp1 are neotenics reproductive nymphs



Zootermopsis angusticollis worker



Termite sp1. worker. Won't sit still.

Compared to Z. angusticollis, T. sp1 has a more prominent pronotum, the last two segments are much more pronounced then Z.angusticollis and are clearly distinguishable from the abdomen. The head of Z.angusticollis is also much more rounded, it's pretty much completely round and is nearly twice the length of the pronotum. Compared to T. sp1 which has rounded top end but eventually lead to a triangle where the jaws meet. (This is why I thought they were drywoods to begin with, for the imagos the head was nearly the same width as the pronotum if looked from above). The head of Z. angusticollis is also smooth while T. sp1 has a few shallow lumplike markings around the front of the head. The most distinguishing feature though is the eyes. Z. angusticollis do not have eyes (At least not this pronounced), they are blind. This species also has a much more elongated abdomen.

At the sites where termite damage was evident I found both hexagonal shrunken pellets like drywoods and wet cylindrical ones mixed together in the same areas. Gallows of this termite species were less flat compared to Zootermopsis and follow the grain of the wood like both drywoods and dampwoods. It seems this species is capable of making a muddy mix of its own feces like dampwoods. These were the only termites I found there, no sign of Zootermopsis angusticollis workers or purely cylindrical wet pellets.

Gallows made by this species are frequently occupied by other insects and ants, out of all the gallows there (pretty much on any wood) only two logs contained termites within the first few cm underneath the bark.

Termite gallows were home to spiders, a solitary mud-wasp of some sort I believe, hibernating hornets, various beetles, mostly Ampedus cordifer, moth larvae, woodlouse, various species of centipede and millipede, wood eating mites, springtails, booklice, and earthworms.

However the most abundant occupier of gallows are Myrmica incompleta, en average I'd say they seem to make up around 40-60% of all the things living in the gallows including termites. Other ants I found are Tapinoma sessile (One colony nesting in wood with evidence of termite damage) and Leptothorax muscorum. The interesting thing is in some of the wood, particularly the ones with exposed rotting wood, there were tons upon tons of dismembered parts of Camponotus modoc. Whether this was competition between colonies, or against M. incompleta or T. sp1. I have no clue. Termites often nested in very close proximity of M. incompleta.

The termites themselves occurred in pretty low density, like I said out of the one large log I messed with, I only counted around 4 or 5 pockets of 1-6 termites within a few centimeters under the wood. The weird part that sticks out to me is that nearly all of them were neotenics. It's quite late in the year so they may be hibernating or something. I'll check if their feeding habit or whatnot increases during spring or late summer next year.

Sorry for lack of pictures, technical malfunction.

the thicker darker wings, small head ratio to pronotum, harder exoskeleton, elongated abdomen, shrunken hexagonal fecal pellets are all in line with characteristics of drywoods but the behaviour and nesting habit clearly defines this species as a dampwood.

Random hypothesis I'm going to throw out. This termite is a dampwood, and like other dampwoods are in the family of Termopsidae. The drywood features evolved in this particular termite to cope with the dry summers here, that would make them highly adaptable and suited to live in the environment where they are from. They can't tunnel because of heavy vegetation and competition from ants so they've evolved to make due with sitting in a log for their entire lives. This is likely the case as the wing morphologies of this species match up more to those of Zootermopsis then Kalotermes and Incisitermes.


Edited by LC3, November 3 2017 - 2:57 PM.

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#5 Online LC3 - Posted October 2 2017 - 6:29 PM

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[Oct/02/2017]

 

Reticulitermes cf. hesperus

Unfortunately the Reticulitermes had a huge die off from dehydration. The secondary reproductive (Which I now know to be a brachypterous neotenic) is healthy and so are most of the nymphs and a soldier but most of the workers have died. Fortunately the neotenic and the nymphs are capable of fending for themselves, to some degree. I've put them in a new setup and hopefully they regroup and found a new colony, although it may take a while.

I'm not sure what caused this sudden dehydration, I believe I watered them a few days ago and looking through the damage they've done to the wood they were doing pretty good, quite a few mudtubes, every wood had some tunnel in it. I left them in the open air setup (which was temporary) originally because I didn't want to disturb them.

 

Zootermopsis angusticollis.

 

I opt to calling these colonies Z. angusticollis VanIsl and Z. angusticollis RichWC, (Vancouver and Richmond West Coast respectively)

 

Z. angusticollis VanIsl:

This colony has been doing great so far, I'm not sure if they have any larvae yet but a lot of workers have been molting, so it seems like they aren't under stress. 

B4XYxHr.jpg

Fecal pellet constructions and wood damage from Z. angusticollis, October 2nd, 2017

 

JGJvYGX.jpgThis colony has a tendency to build "mud blankets" they're in a closed environment so I believe these are for regulating moisture as opposed to defense. October 2nd, 2017

 

9oJIbUL.jpg

October 2nd 2017

 

Z. angusticollis RimdBC:

Queen and king are still eating and have stopped laying eggs (normal for termites). Last time I counted there were around 10. These eggs should be hatching in abouter 4 or so more months. The test tube water has started growing Serratia marcescens. Not very uncommon for test tube water but I'm not sure how it will affect the termites and their gut microbiome. They're also starting to ware a bit thin on wood but I can't really do anything about either of these.

 

1Gl6jtO.jpg

GNlQbjg.jpg

October 2nd 2017

Eggs, just a few more months left until they hatch.

 

Termite sp.1

 

Still haven't figured out what termite species they are. I need to refill their containers with wood again and move them to better setups. 

 

boKcnKK.jpg

Hexagonal pellet similar to drywood termite species. The pellets still seem to retain their cone shape even when the termites feed on wet wood, somewhat.

 

bZIxo8d.jpgfGxx3CW.jpg

October 2nd, 2017

Now that the imagos have fattened up a bit, they look a lot more like Z. angusticollis besides colour. Although the head is still smaller in proportion, slightly angular, and more thin when looking from the side. 

 

aPSWJYh.jpg

KIzpgxH.jpgnbzX0rh.jpg

October 2nd 2017

I haven't been able to find more of these in the wild, but then again I haven't been really trying to either, I've found a few random openings in less damaged and intact wood that lead to gallows like termites but they may be caused by anything (although they probably are caused by termites), any other wood that it damaged enough to reveal a few inner galleries are abandoned and overrun with Myrmica incompleta. I'm still not sure how they sustain themselves as a species with such little wood around the area. The dyke is apparently a giant restoration project to make up for the habitat loss caused by the construction of YVR (Vancouver International Airport) and is primarily aimed to protect birds. There's a possibility these termites were here before the restoration project and existed in a different environment. I'll do more research on the Restoration project and the documented wildlife later.

 

On another note I've found these images on bugguide

http://bugguide.net/node/view/1013183

This specimen, (doesn't look like Z. angusticollis in my opinion) has wings nearly identical to Z. angusticollis being very light, but has a really angulate head, more so then the ones I've found.

 

http://bugguide.net/node/view/148358

This specimen looks nearly identical to the ones I have, dark thicker looking wings, slightly rectangular head, smaller head proportions and rounded posterior end of the head. They still might not be the same species though given the distance.


Edited by LC3, November 1 2017 - 6:21 PM.

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#6 Online LC3 - Posted October 3 2017 - 2:15 PM

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[Oct/03/2017]

 

No sign of the Reticulitermes hesperus in their new container. I found one worker alive and one or two dead. There's a possibility the rest of the workers/remaining have recovered. :D


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#7 Online LC3 - Posted November 1 2017 - 9:01 PM

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[Nov/01/2017]

 

Reticulitermes hesperus

Haven't really checked on them, I've seen at most two workers.

 

Zootermopsis angusticollis

 

Z. angusticollis VanIsl:

The colony I collected at Vancouver Island has laid a cluster of 20 or so eggs (Twice as much, nearly 40 eggs actually :D ) at the bottom of the container. Since they are already established it should take roughly 1-2 months for them to hatch.

majnHtl.jpg

NhflHo3.jpg

October 27th 

According to GC (Chatroom) this looks like fried chicken. 

 

Workers headbanging, not to heavy metal however.

 

Z. angusticollis RimdBC:

Two nymphs hatched from the eggs :D . Right on schedule I think, they laid these eggs around 3 or 4 months ago, a bit early for them to hatch but 3-4 months for the first eggs to hatch isn't unheard of I think. They're so tiny, and pretty clumsy, and generally don't seem like they have a clue on what they're doing. I'm surprised that the imagos don't accidentally kill them by walking over them. The eggs start off looking like a clear gelatin yellow being slightly rounded rods in shape,  eventually they grow a bit and start turning a cloudy whitish colour. They look pretty much like Camponotus eggs at that point. Then they hatch. There's still around 6 or so eggs left.They actually have 13. 

 

Termite sp.1

The imagos haven't killed each other and are doing good, same goes for the group of nymphs or neotenics (I believe they are actually nymphs) and that one worker. The pair of 3 imagos laid two eggs but I think they might have ate them, probably because they felt the wood they were given was unsustainable or didn't feel secure enough.  

 

I've been browsing on INaturalist in the Zootermopsis section and I've noticed a lot of peculiar looking termite alates around the northern half of Washington, most of these specimens were observed along the north west and western half of the mountains, there was one swarm witnessed by WeatherAnt that featured brown alates and I'm assuming that was in the east. They differ in subtle traits, like darker wings, some have triangularish heads, some . All of them are dark brown in colour. Apparently Zootermopsis is one of the more well studied genre of termites so I'm not sure if anyone has noticed this already. I've found a few completely brown specimens on the site in California and one in Oregon. For the Californian specimens there might be a chance that it is Z. nevadensis. Other then 

 

rWdrRWl.jpg1Gyo2ub.jpg

October 24th

Egg, compared to Z. angusticollis, these termites have more oblong and peanutty lobed shaped eggs, they look like peanuts in my opinion. They're also lighter in colour. This might be an unfertilized egg although I don't think it's likely as termites mate before laying eggs. 

 

I'll post pictures of the Z. angusticollis eggs (and nymphs) later.


Edited by LC3, January 20 2018 - 2:21 PM.

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#8 Offline T.C. - Posted November 1 2017 - 10:10 PM

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Awesome. Although, it's not Nov,11th? :P

#9 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted November 2 2017 - 9:03 AM

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I'm caring for 2 R. flavipes alate nymphs, and I was just wondering: are you caring for your termite reproductive nymphs just like your adult reproductives? 

By the way, the Termite sp.1 "secondary reproductives" are the reproductive nymphs, which will molt into alates next year.


Edited by Connectimyrmex, November 2 2017 - 9:06 AM.

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#10 Online LC3 - Posted November 2 2017 - 12:51 PM

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Awesome. Although, it's not Nov,11th? :P

Oops. My bad. :P

 

I'm caring for 2 R. flavipes alate nymphs, and I was just wondering: are you caring for your termite reproductive nymphs just like your adult reproductives? 

By the way, the Termite sp.1 "secondary reproductives" are the reproductive nymphs, which will molt into alates next year.

Yeah I figured they were the reproductive nymphs. I'm not exactly sure if they will molt into alates or molt to become a neotenic next year or this year, or any of the following years. If they feel that they're still in a colony they might become neotenics but I'm pretty sure under the current circumstances they'll molt into alates or do nothing.


Edited by LC3, November 2 2017 - 12:51 PM.

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#11 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted November 2 2017 - 3:12 PM

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Awesome. Although, it's not Nov,11th? :P

Oops. My bad. :P

 

I'm caring for 2 R. flavipes alate nymphs, and I was just wondering: are you caring for your termite reproductive nymphs just like your adult reproductives? 

By the way, the Termite sp.1 "secondary reproductives" are the reproductive nymphs, which will molt into alates next year.

Yeah I figured they were the reproductive nymphs. I'm not exactly sure if they will molt into alates or molt to become a neotenic next year or this year, or any of the following years. If they feel that they're still in a colony they might become neotenics but I'm pretty sure under the current circumstances they'll molt into alates or do nothing.

 

They will molt into alates. Thankfully, termite alates do not need to fly to bond, just break off their wings and put them on the floor to get into the tandem running mood. That's what I did with the drywood termites from back in hawaii (they always got stuck in the kickout hole)


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Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#12 Online LC3 - Posted January 15 2018 - 4:45 PM

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[January/15/2018]

 

So a lot has happened since I updated this journal. To give a quick rundown, the Subterranean termites are still alive and well even though it's just a handful of workers, the Zootermopsis angusticollis colony I got from Vancouver Island is exploding, the Z. angusticollis colony I raised is still raising larvae and having them mysteriously disappear. Termite sp. 1 is probably Z. cf. nevadensis nuttingi, they also have raised one larva. I also lost most of my pics that I took which is mostly why I haven't updated this journal.

 

Reticulitermes hesperus

Handful of workers, found around 4 last time crammed in one piece of wood. I have no idea if they will recover or not but the ones I found were doing healthy. They barricaded that piece of wood last I checked.

 

Zootermopsis angusticollis

 

Z. angusticollis VanIsl:

 

Colony is booming in population. I've still been feeding them dead pine wood although the latter pieces are more fresh (since it's winter and not a lot of easily accessible rotting wood lying around)

Z. angusticollis larvae. They wander around a lot. Found them everywhere in anything from tiny crevices to the surface, both places where workers will not go.

 

Z. angusticollis RimdBC: 

Still raising larvae, and still finding them to be gone. They raised two of them to around late instar when one disappeared. Last time I saw the other one was when it was probably a molt or two away from becoming a young adult. They have dug around the wood extensively so it's possible they've just never been present whenever I bother to look at them.

 

2vhNU1M.jpg

jXaweSa.jpg

7xdgmel.jpg

heZu0Pl.jpg

 

[Nov/12/2017]

 

wU6vasy.jpg

 

[Jan/12/2018]

 

Zootermopsis cf. nevadensis 

 

The bunch of alate nymphs are down to four.

 

The imagos are still coexisting fine, can confirm there is a male and female in there since I saw two of them mating at some point. Looks like the egg they had is still there since they manage to raise a larva :yahoo: . I think thy look a lot more worker like compared to the Z. angusticollis at a similar stage.

 

Based on the time it probably took no more then 3 months to hatch.

 

 

r02uAFg.jpg

4u5NuMF.jpg

U3qYDy3.jpg

 

[Dec/08/2017]

 

UJw4xci.jpg

lXkoulY.jpg

q81mhws.jpg

uposrVK.jpg

 

[Jan/12/2018]

 

Like the Z. angusticollis larvae they walk around a lot. This one was just walking in circles around the container. :lol:


Edited by LC3, January 16 2018 - 3:34 PM.

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#13 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted January 16 2018 - 6:04 AM

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Those nymphs are adorable :)


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Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#14 Online LC3 - Posted April 13 2018 - 7:01 PM

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[April/13/2018]

 

Reticulitermes hesperus

I am fairly certain these are all dead by now, haven't seen any sign of activity. :boohoo:

I might go look for more this year.

 

Zootermopsis angusticollis

 

Z. angusticollis VanIsl:

I haven't really been paying attention to these guys and they have made an absolute mess. Virtually abandoning the lower levels with almost all of the wood destroyed and converted into pellets. They see to have reached the maximum population that container in its current state can sustain.  I did find out that they will eat hard boiled egg yolk interestingly. I am not sure how fond of yolk they are or how they digest it for that matter. It appears they don't tend to eat all that much. Some of that weird cottony looking fungus also grew on the egg yolk.

 

Also it feels exactly like cotton too, it's sort of springy and tough. After I threw away the fungus a few pieces clicked in my mind and I realized two things; this fungus seems to grow exclusively on protein and that I have never seen it elsewhere. I find it odd that it grew both in my Z. angusticollis setups but never in the Z. cf. nevadensis or any other setup for that matter. It may possibly have hitched a ride on the pine wood but the termites might also be possible carriers.

I should run some experiments.

 

March 1, 2018

March 3/4, 2018

 

Z. angusticollis RimdBC

 

This colony seems to be doing exceptionally well, I'm just waiting for them to accidentally drown themselves. That aside they have also produced a soldier :D

In termites it seems rather common for soldiers to be produced early on although they do tend to be much smaller (this one looks like it's around half or less of their maximum size). Those fellow 9 imagoes also helped probably. The workers tend to groom the soldier a lot.

 

 

Presoldier, March 9, 2018

Soldier upon molting, mid March probably

March 30, 2018

April 7, 2018

 

March 9, 2018

March something

April 7, 2018

Zootermopsis cf. nevadensis

 

 

I moved these into a test tube a two or three weeks ago with wood from where I found them. They are starting to settle but slowly. The three and their one worker are still getting along.

 

All four of the nymphs are basically dead, I am not exactly sure how or why either.

 

 EDIT: Nope they settled. They just laid an egg. This one looks more elongated then the last one.


Edited by LC3, April 13 2018 - 10:52 PM.

  • rdurham02 and Scrixx like this

Colonies

Spoiler

 

 


#15 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted April 17 2018 - 9:10 PM

Connectimyrmex

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Glad to see that your termites are doing great!
I've seen that mold in my termitat (which has dampwood termites). Maybe the mold is commensal.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
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Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
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#16 Online Scrixx - Posted April 18 2018 - 9:08 AM

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This is a great journal. It's really detailed. Keep it up! I'll be following along.


Queen Ants - Colonies with workers for sale

Camponotus species available maybe June 1?

 

YouTube - Keeping:

Ants: Myrmecocystus mexicanus - Myrmecocystus mimicus - Pheidole xerophila -  Pogonomyrmex rugosus 

Aquariums: Apistogramma panduro and fry - Bolivian Ram and fry - Celestial Pearl Danio and fry 

 

Journals: Pogonomyrmex subnitidusMyrmecocystus mexicanus, M. mimicus - Pheidole xerophila - Pogonomyrmex rugosus 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lc3s journals, journal, termite, unidentified species, reticulitermes, zootermopsis, zootermopsis angusticollis, reticulitermes hesperus, termite journal

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