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Formica queen ID request. Sep/12/2017, Richmond, BC


Best Answer Batspiderfish , September 12 2017 - 6:09 PM

Formica neorufibarbis or F. subpolita. I can't tell from the pictures; you might want to turn noise-reduction off.

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#1 Offline LC3 - Posted September 12 2017 - 5:31 PM

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1. Location: West Richmond, BC.
2. Date of collection: Sept 12th, 2017
3. Habitat of collection: Suburban neighbourhood, queen was nesting in a log
4. Length: Approximately 10mm, gaster is pretty swollen.
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture:  

Head: head is completely dull black/dark grey with brown mandibles, head width slightly larger then mesosoma. Antennae are also dull black

Mesosoma: has darkish orangish-red classic X pattern over black. Legs same colour as gaster (orange) and don't fade to any other colour 

Gaster: Shiny and black, first plate slightly more dull

6. Distinguishing characteristics: Kind of small for a Formica sp. Looks like Camponotus nearcticus.
7. Distinguishing behavior: Not so great at climbing smooth surfaces, nested in wood, 
8. Nest description: Founding chamber was in wood (dry rotten treated log), unlikely it burrowed into the wood from the bark.

Chamber was a long gallow, just enough for her to squeeze through. Basically only a few mm in width but at least 3 times her length. Exits were plugged with sawdust.

 

Queen, Profile view

 

Side view

 

My attempts at trying to get a shot of its facial features

 

 

 


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#2 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted September 12 2017 - 6:09 PM   Best Answer

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Formica neorufibarbis or F. subpolita. I can't tell from the pictures; you might want to turn noise-reduction off.


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If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

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Black lives still matter.


#3 Offline LC3 - Posted September 12 2017 - 8:46 PM

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I'm not sure if I can turn noise reduction off on an iphone, i'll try to get a better camera or something that can act as a macro lens. Are there any morphological features that distinguish F. neorufibarbis and F. subpolita? I'm leaning towards F. neorufibarbis.

I caught two queens around 2 years ago in the interior, at Okanagan lake, they were IDed as F. neorufibarbis but they don't resemble this queen. I'm pretty skeptical about the ID given to the two queens.

 

image for reference.


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#4 Offline VoidElecent - Posted September 13 2017 - 8:12 AM

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This post makes me question my F. pallidefulva ID. The queen's workers are about 3-4 millimeters in length and much darker than what I know F. pallidefulva to typically be.

 

ZkgWflg.jpg


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#5 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted September 13 2017 - 8:46 AM

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I suspect a lot of the hairier "Formica neorufibarbis" are likely F. pacifica and F. moki (along the pacific coast).

Void: if the head is rounder than other Formica (especially on the workers) then she is likely from the pallidefulva group.


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If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

----

Black lives still matter.


#6 Offline VoidElecent - Posted September 13 2017 - 2:57 PM

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I suspect a lot of the hairier "Formica neorufibarbis" are likely F. pacifica and F. moki (along the pacific coast).

Void: if the head is rounder than other Formica (especially on the workers) then she is likely from the pallidefulva group.

 

So I checked on my colony today; the ants' heads are noticeably rounder. What are the other possibilities?


In the market for a queen? www.Antsylvania.com
Check out my Anting & Myrmecology quizzes! Quiz 1 ~ Quiz 2 ~ Quiz 3
 
"Have you come here for forgiveness?
Have you come to raise the dead?
Have you come here to play Jesus
To the lepers in your head?"

#7 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted September 13 2017 - 3:28 PM

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I suspect a lot of the hairier "Formica neorufibarbis" are likely F. pacifica and F. moki (along the pacific coast).

Void: if the head is rounder than other Formica (especially on the workers) then she is likely from the pallidefulva group.

 

So I checked on my colony today; the ants' heads are noticeably rounder. What are the other possibilities?

 

 

Your Formica queen is probably just the darker F. pallidefulva or F. incerta. They all look that way where I live.


If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

----

Black lives still matter.





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