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Argentine ant problem and questions


20 replies to this topic

#1 Offline dspdrew - Posted August 10 2017 - 6:38 PM

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As some of you know, I made special feet for my ant cabinets a while back to protect them from Argentine ants.

 

med_gallery_2_687_1465482.jpg

 

 

I recently had them invade and trail right under the cabinets to a bowl with some trash left on the ground. I moved that bowl outside and sucked them all up with my vacuum. But now, ever since, they have been coming in and wandering all over underneath the cabinets every day. I cleaned everything up and vacuumed the floor as well as I could, but they keep coming back. I even got home from work today and found a small trail of them going to absolutely nothing.

 

Usually when they invade, I spray the area with Raid where they are coming in and I don't see them anywhere near there anymore for a very long time. I can't do that this time because I would have to move the cabinets away from the wall to get to the location. I'm also worried about the fumes from the Raid hurting my ants.

 

I have a few questions for the experts.

 

How much raid is really in the air after I spray it, and is it enough to hurt my ants? It smells very strong, but I don't know how much poison is actually in the air, as opposed to the scent that they add to it.

 

I know ants can smell really good, but I have always been under the impression that they wander around until they come across food of some sort. Can they smell food from a distance and if so, approximately how far? if they can smell the food from a distance, then wouldn't they invade every bit of food you have laying around immediately? Could it be possible they are smelling what I have in these cabinets, but just can't get to it, so they keep wandering all around underneath them?

 

So far it looks like the cabinets are doing their job and keeping the ants out, but I'm always worried that they still might find a way in. The probability is much higher with them wandering all over the place directly under them, which is why I want them to go away.



#2 Online Serafine - Posted August 10 2017 - 11:37 PM

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Did you try putting some cloves at the location where they come in? I'm not sure if it helps with Argentines but it's a fairly common method of repelling ants as most of them don't like the strong smell and it can disrupt their trails by just overloading the ants' olfactory sensors. It might also be enough to conceal the food smell from the cabinets.


Edited by Serafine, August 10 2017 - 11:38 PM.

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#3 Offline drtrmiller - Posted August 11 2017 - 12:37 AM

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If you use something with D-limonene in it on the carpet and hard surfaces, the trails will be completely eliminated. It's commonly found in citrus cleaners if you don't want to purchase the pure stuff.

D-limonene will also kill any ants it gets on, and prevent them from wanting to come back for a while, all without harming any ants in the room. Insecticides are out of the question in confined spaces like a small apartment.

#4 Offline ultraex2 - Posted August 11 2017 - 5:23 AM

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If you know where they're coming in through you could also lay down some diatamaceous earth instead of spraying - it's completely natural (even edible) and then you don't have to worry about poisonous particles in the air.



#5 Offline AntsMAN - Posted August 11 2017 - 5:48 AM

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What about ant bait drops.

 

raid-ant-killer-liquid.png?la=en-CA&hash


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#6 Offline lucas3431 - Posted August 11 2017 - 1:03 PM

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Find out how they're entering the room then block it up.

 

The spray air raid lasts for days in the air in fact some pesticides can last weeks, to be honest you shouldn't really be using it at all around your Tribes, it's like smoking, it's ok for a while but years later it messes you up.

 

If you could find their nest outside that would be better, more easy to control also then you can decide on what to do with the wild colony.

 

Got to make the room air tight, windows, doors and floors.

 

It won't be long till they figure out climbing the wall then to the ceiling then to cabinet.



#7 Offline StopSpazzing - Posted August 11 2017 - 2:17 PM

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Find out how they're entering the room then block it up.

 

The spray air raid lasts for days in the air in fact some pesticides can last weeks, to be honest you shouldn't really be using it at all around your Tribes, it's like smoking, it's ok for a while but years later it messes you up.

 

If you could find their nest outside that would be better, more easy to control also then you can decide on what to do with the wild colony.

 

Got to make the room air tight, windows, doors and floors.

 

It won't be long till they figure out climbing the wall then to the ceiling then to cabinet.

 

I agree with all of this.

If you know where they're coming in through you could also lay down some diatamaceous earth instead of spraying - it's completely natural (even edible) and then you don't have to worry about poisonous particles in the air.

 

 

Suggest this under the cabinets.

 

 

 

Also, why not take the ants out at their source and use ant bait (as was suggested) in multiple locations. And why not weather proof the cabinets?



#8 Offline gcsnelling - Posted August 11 2017 - 2:46 PM

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Look for Optigard bait, it is very attractive to Tapinoma sessile, and I expect it would be to  argentines as well.  I would never use DE, although it may be edible, you most certain ly to not want to breath it or get it in your eyes.


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#9 Offline Shaye - Posted August 11 2017 - 3:00 PM

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I didn't know how to perfectly describe it, but this poison is excellent in my opinion. Tapinoma sessil would constantly invade my colonies in bursts, and none of the other raid-brand baits would work. This one however.. They never leave a drop behind. I would suggest trying it if you haven't yet.

https://www.amazon.c...6/dp/B006QYTDSO

It's easily found in-store as well.

Edited by Shaye, August 11 2017 - 3:01 PM.

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#10 Offline dspdrew - Posted August 11 2017 - 5:41 PM

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Find out how they're entering the room then block it up.


I'm not sure where you live, but that isn't in the realm of possible. They can enter through a pin hole. There are probably literally millions of holes that size all through out a room in an old apartment building.
 
 

If you could find their nest outside that would be better, more easy to control also then you can decide on what to do with the wild colony.

 
These questions are regarding a very specific species of ants here in Southern California--Argentine ants. Controlling a wild Argentine ant colony is also not even close to possible. Their colony essentially spans half of California.

 

It won't be long till they figure out climbing the wall then to the ceiling then to cabinet.

 
These cabinets are specifically designed to keep ants out using Fluon. Attaching the cabinets to, or allowing them to touch the wall or ceiling would completely defeat their purpose. There is only one way into the cabinet, and that is up the feet designed to keep them out.

 

And why not weather proof the cabinets?

 

Not sure what you mean.

 

 

Look for Optigard bait, it is very attractive to Tapinoma sessile, and I expect it would be to  argentines as well.  I would never use DE, although it may be edible, you most certain ly to not want to breath it or get it in your eyes.

 

It's hard to imagine them taking any bait, but I'll give it a try.


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#11 Offline StopSpazzing - Posted August 11 2017 - 6:45 PM

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Weatherproofing cabinets meaning adding weather strip and more to all the doors so they seal air tight to prevent anything getting in or out for that matter

 

Look for Optigard bait, it is very attractive to Tapinoma sessile, and I expect it would be to  argentines as well.  I would never use DE, although it may be edible, you most certain ly to not want to breath it or get it in your eyes.

Not sure what you are talking about. Please give proof that this is worst to breath in than ant spray like RAID. It's crushed fossils, non-toxic and won't harm you unless you have medical problems related to breathing.


Edited by StopSpazzing, August 11 2017 - 6:46 PM.


#12 Offline dspdrew - Posted August 11 2017 - 10:20 PM

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Weatherproofing cabinets meaning adding weather strip and more to all the doors so they seal air tight to prevent anything getting in or out for that matter

 

Would be almost impossible to seal these kind of cabinets. All it takes is one pin hole for them to get in. Best thing to do is keep them from getting to the cabinets.



#13 Offline gcsnelling - Posted August 12 2017 - 2:00 AM

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Look for Optigard bait, it is very attractive to Tapinoma sessile, and I expect it would be to  argentines as well.  I would never use DE, although it may be edible, you most certain ly to not want to breath it or get it in your eyes.

 

It's hard to imagine them taking any bait, but I'll give it a try.

 

 

I totally agree, argentines are not the most cooperative when it comes to bait acceptance, but based on how readily Tapinoma takes this stuff it is certainly worth a try.


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#14 Offline lucas3431 - Posted August 13 2017 - 4:16 AM

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HOW TO SUSTAINABLY STOP ARGENTINE ANTS ON THE MARCH

 

Properties can typically expect a 40% decrease in ant activity after a baiting procedure has been deployed for a month. Traditional baits are distributed with the hope that the ants will simply find them. But what if you could proactively lure the ants? In an effort to improve its effectiveness, the researchers took a bait commonly used in California called Optigard, and mixed in an Argentine ant pheromone called (Z)-9-hexadecenal. The hope was that the pheromone would act as a dinner bell.

 

 

(Z)-9-hexadecenal

 

 

Find chemicals in the Chemexper Chemical Directory


Edited by lucas3431, August 13 2017 - 4:23 AM.


#15 Offline dspdrew - Posted August 13 2017 - 8:31 AM

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HOW TO SUSTAINABLY STOP ARGENTINE ANTS ON THE MARCH

 

Properties can typically expect a 40% decrease in ant activity after a baiting procedure has been deployed for a month. Traditional baits are distributed with the hope that the ants will simply find them. But what if you could proactively lure the ants? In an effort to improve its effectiveness, the researchers took a bait commonly used in California called Optigard, and mixed in an Argentine ant pheromone called (Z)-9-hexadecenal. The hope was that the pheromone would act as a dinner bell.

 

 

(Z)-9-hexadecenal

 

 

Find chemicals in the Chemexper Chemical Directory

 

Thanks. Looks like a interesting article. I'll read it as soon as I get a chance.


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#16 Offline lucas3431 - Posted August 13 2017 - 9:24 AM

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HOW TO SUSTAINABLY STOP ARGENTINE ANTS ON THE MARCH

 

Properties can typically expect a 40% decrease in ant activity after a baiting procedure has been deployed for a month. Traditional baits are distributed with the hope that the ants will simply find them. But what if you could proactively lure the ants? In an effort to improve its effectiveness, the researchers took a bait commonly used in California called Optigard, and mixed in an Argentine ant pheromone called (Z)-9-hexadecenal. The hope was that the pheromone would act as a dinner bell.

 

 

(Z)-9-hexadecenal

 

 

Find chemicals in the Chemexper Chemical Directory

 

Thanks. Looks like a interesting article. I'll read it as soon as I get a chance.

 

Just found this....it's basically the same information

Pheromone-assisted techniques to improve the efficacy of insecticide sprays against Linepithema humile (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

What I don't understand is if this actually works then why aren't they using this method....this article was written back in 2014, maybe they want the 142% effectiveness before releasing it to the public  :thinking: . If it works it will benefit native Ants greatly

 


Edited by lucas3431, August 13 2017 - 9:27 AM.


#17 Offline lucas3431 - Posted August 13 2017 - 9:47 AM

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HOW TO SUSTAINABLY STOP ARGENTINE ANTS ON THE MARCH

 

Properties can typically expect a 40% decrease in ant activity after a baiting procedure has been deployed for a month. Traditional baits are distributed with the hope that the ants will simply find them. But what if you could proactively lure the ants? In an effort to improve its effectiveness, the researchers took a bait commonly used in California called Optigard, and mixed in an Argentine ant pheromone called (Z)-9-hexadecenal. The hope was that the pheromone would act as a dinner bell.

 

 

(Z)-9-hexadecenal

 

 

Find chemicals in the Chemexper Chemical Directory

 

Thanks. Looks like a interesting article. I'll read it as soon as I get a chance.

 

 

Just found this....it's basically the same information

Pheromone-assisted techniques to improve the efficacy of insecticide sprays against Linepithema humile (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

What I don't understand is if this actually works then why aren't they using this method....this article was written back in 2014, maybe they want the 142% effectiveness before releasing it to the public   :thinking: . If it works it will benefit native Ants greatly

 

Edit: my mistake I found the 2016 article 

Development of a Pheromone-Assisted Baiting Technique for Argentine Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

Edited by lucas3431, August 13 2017 - 9:48 AM.


#18 Offline dspdrew - Posted August 13 2017 - 2:40 PM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

 

 

Look for Optigard bait, it is very attractive to Tapinoma sessile, and I expect it would be to  argentines as well.  I would never use DE, although it may be edible, you most certain ly to not want to breath it or get it in your eyes.

 
It's hard to imagine them taking any bait, but I'll give it a try.
 
I totally agree, argentines are not the most cooperative when it comes to bait acceptance, but based on how readily Tapinoma takes this stuff it is certainly worth a try.

 
The reviews on Amazon look really good. I just ordered some, so we'll see how it does.



#19 Offline dspdrew - Posted August 19 2017 - 11:16 PM

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So I ended up getting this.

 

817HSO6osbL._SL1500_.jpg

 

https://www.amazon.c...duct/B005UVG5SU

 

 

I put some out and the Argentine ants immediately started eating it right up.

 

Suckers!

 

I hope they feed it to all their queens. B)

 

 



#20 Offline gcsnelling - Posted August 20 2017 - 7:01 AM

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I thought they might like it.


Edited by gcsnelling, August 20 2017 - 7:03 AM.





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