Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  

Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use, and contain no ads for members. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo
- - - - -

Prenolepis or Lasius?

prenolepis lasius myrmecocystus

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Offline marcel - Posted August 9 2017 - 10:22 AM

marcel

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Hello,

 

a friend of mine collected a couple of queens during his day trip 5 days ago at an steppe like rockier area between California and Arizona.

 

The queens measure about 9 mm (0.35 inch) in length. They have a darkish-gray yellow color. The legs are lighter than the rest of the body.

 

Here are 2 pictures, with 1 zoomed in. I do not have 1 of those queens yet, but my friend will give me one these next days and I could take better quality pictures then.

 

http://www.formicult..._935_134285.jpg

 

http://www.formicult..._935_704747.png

 

 

Greetings,

 

Marcel



#2 Offline VoidElecent - Posted August 9 2017 - 10:31 AM

VoidElecent

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 745 posts
  • LocationPhiladelphia, PA.

Holy mother of god that's a lot of queens.

 

From the looks of it, they're all LasiusPrenolepis usually fly in the beginning of the year, around March. I couldn't tell you what species it is, you'd need a guide (or wait for workers) to determine whether they're L. neoniger, L. alienus, L. pallitarsis, or L. flavus.


  • Evanthomas89 likes this
In the market for a queen? www.Antsylvania.com
Check out my Anting & Myrmecology quizzes! Quiz 1 ~ Quiz 2 ~ Quiz 3
 
"Have you come here for forgiveness?
Have you come to raise the dead?
Have you come here to play Jesus
To the lepers in your head?"

#3 Offline marcel - Posted August 9 2017 - 11:26 AM

marcel

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Okay. I always must smile when I read Lasius flavus or Lasius neoniger. Because those areas are like desert. Here in germany those 2 species Lasius flavus, Lasius neoniger (german version: Lasius niger, maybe sister species)  love very humid areas with almost all the time wet soil, much growth and they all hibernate for 5 months and face strong winter with snow.

 

What fascinates me the most is: From what I read you can find Lasius neoniger also in Washington and other areas with snow in winter and cold temperatures. It is hard to imagine how the same species can be in 1 area with hibernation and in 1 with no hibernation or just a 1-2 months maximum hibernation. The area those queens were found should be about 64-67 °F in December/January in average and with strong sunshine on certain colony locations even reach 75 °F + and that in winter. So there isn't a real hibernation maybe a lower activity but still some production and scouting. Interesting. I wonder if Lasius neoniger in the south of north america is actually the same Lasius neoniger as the ones you could find in the Northeast like New York, Washington, etc..

 

So you guys think this is most likely a Lasius species like neoniger. Is there any way like from coloring or Thorax width to identify which one?



#4 Offline klawfran3 - Posted August 9 2017 - 12:08 PM

klawfran3

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 256 posts

"collected a couple of queens" :lol:

 

But yes those are definitely Lasius.


This message brought to you by the Committee for the Education of Folks who Describe Arthropod Taxa as 'Not Interesting' (CEFDATNI)

#5 Offline Loops117 - Posted August 9 2017 - 12:20 PM

Loops117

    Vendor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 782 posts
  • LocationSouth Lyon, Michigan

Wow, teach me how you did this. lol

sooooo many queens!

 

Agreed with the rest, Lasius sp.


icon3.png

117 Colonies & Ant Farms
an Artisan Ant keeping company aimed to provide Formicaria and Insect Habitats
Now selling byformica products!
Michigan Ant Keeping - A Home for Michigan Ant Keepers.
 
......nobody likes a statist.


#6 Offline marcel - Posted August 9 2017 - 12:43 PM

marcel

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

How can I find out if this is Lasius neoniger or any other one? which ones are common in Arizona and California and are darkish gray with a little yellow?



#7 Offline marcel - Posted August 12 2017 - 5:08 AM

marcel

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Today finally 2 queens arrived and I was able to measure and take pictures even 1 short video I will also link.

 

The queen measures about 1 cm (0.39 inch) in length.

 

I was able to get half way decent pictures from the top, front and side. Also the videos reveals a lot and is quite zoomed in.

 

Anyone can identify the queen now?

 

Pictures:

 

http://www.formicult...940_1884447.jpg

 

http://www.formicult...940_3647577.jpg

 

http://www.formicult...940_1013166.jpg

 

http://www.formicult...940_1239680.jpg

 

 

Video: 

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=gtXflCYklBc



#8 Offline Evanthomas89 - Posted August 12 2017 - 6:26 AM

Evanthomas89

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 137 posts
  • LocationHowell, NJ

Awesome find!

I want to say it looks like Lasius flavus but that might just be because I really want a L. flavus queen. I'm sure you'll be able to ID her once she has workers. 


Check out my Youtube


#9 Offline marcel - Posted August 12 2017 - 9:37 AM

marcel

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

What actually would speak against Myrmecocystus testaceus? I found a few pictures only and a few videos but they also look much Lasius like and should be at least 1 cm (0.39 inch) or slightly above right? The legs of my queen are also kind of yellow brownish and the size is a bit large for Lasius. The largest Lasius I know of is Lasius niger with 0.8 cm (0.31 inch). Or are by any chance the Lasius in north america almost as large as Serviformica? This is definately 1-2 mm larger than Lasius niger, too dark for flavus (have here many too + they are smaller in general). 

 

So which Lasius is actually about 0.39 inch long? It is about the same size as my Formica rufibarbis and 100% reaching Formica fusca in size.

 

Here 2 pictures to see the size comparison. Both test tubes have the same width and I can even see with my own eyes while holding it from different angles that they are about the same size.

 

The queens were found in California close to the border to Arizona, desert like area. And more than 100s could be easily dug out on that day.

 

Pictures: 

 

http://www.formicult...940_6190737.jpg

 

http://www.formicult...940_2206565.jpg


Edited by marcel, August 12 2017 - 9:39 AM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: prenolepis, lasius, myrmecocystus

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users