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Queen ID - St. Louis, MO 7/15/17


Best Answer VoidElecent , July 15 2017 - 1:50 PM

I'm think this could be an Aphaenogaster sp. queen.

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#1 Offline BMM - Posted July 15 2017 - 4:29 AM

BMM

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1. Location of collection: Just south of St. Louis
2. Date of collection: 7/15/17
3. Habitat of collection: Found dead on a table in a local park
4. Length (from head to gaster): 8 mm
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture: Brownish red head and mesosoma, the gaster is a reddish orange.
6. Distinguishing characteristics: Two petioles
7. Distinguishing behavior: None
8. Nest description: Not sure.

 

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0715070713

 



#2 Offline VoidElecent - Posted July 15 2017 - 1:50 PM   Best Answer

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I'm think this could be an Aphaenogaster sp. queen.


In the market for a queen? www.Antsylvania.com
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And if your head explodes with dark forebodings too
I'll see you on the dark side of the moon

#3 Offline BMM - Posted July 15 2017 - 4:01 PM

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I'm pretty sure that's right. There's a noticeable ridge on the mesosoma and the coloration matches pretty closely with pictures of A. fulva.






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