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UPDATED: San Bernardino, CA. 7/12/17. Two species with better pics.


Best Answer dspdrew , July 17 2017 - 5:33 AM

I too think the one from the Barstow area is probably Forelius. All the ones I've seen have those striped gasters.

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#1 Offline Scrixx - Posted July 11 2017 - 6:55 PM

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This is the queen that got me back into the hobby. I caught one several years ago but she died due to flooding. I never picked up the hobby until I found this lady while I was watering my plants in my backyard! I didn't check on her until today July 11, 2017 and she has her first worker! 

 

 

Edit: Solenopsis Invicta

1. Location (on a map) of collection: San Bernardino County, California. Found on my patio as I was watering the plants.
2. Date of collection: June 17, 2017
3. Habitat of collection: Urban Chaparral, it's like almost a desert but not quite yet. Dry but still has shrubs and some greenery. Though my yard is full of green grass and plants.
4. Length (from head to gaster): 9mm, nanitic is 2-2.5mm long.
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture: Dark brown - black. Smooth in general
6. Distinguishing characteristics: Two nodes. Her nanitic eclosed within 3.5 weeks. I closed her in June 17, and she had a worker by July 11.
7. Distinguishing behavior: Settled right into the test tube and starting cleaning herself immediately.
8. Nest description: N/A

 

Ms7ADAN.png

 

8Dqzipx.png

 

NQu57AF.gif

 

Also got a 2nd queen to ID. Got better pictures too.

 

Edit: Dorymrymex forelius

1. Location (on a map) of collection: Wild Crossing, Barstow, California. Found walking on the ground day after rain.
2. Date of collection: July 10, 2017
3. Habitat of collection: Desert with shrubs and dried grass. 
4. Length (from head to gaster): 6mm
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture: Orange head, orange thorax, shiny orange abdomen with 4 distinct dark black stripes. Whole ant appears to be smooth with no hairs.
6. Distinguishing characteristics: Doesn't appear to have any nodes. Smooth thorax with no spines. Thorax has three humps.
7. Distinguishing behavior: Settled right into the test tube and starting cleaning herself immediately.
8. Nest description: N/A

 

0S6BJWy.pngh0qjuBV.gif

Habitat: 

 

Route66-SofBarstow.jpg


Edited by Scrixx, July 17 2017 - 8:42 AM.


#2 Offline Scrixx - Posted July 12 2017 - 5:41 PM

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Update: Got better pictures of her.

 

8Dqzipx.png

 

Also got a 2nd queen to ID. Got better pictures too.

 

1. Location (on a map) of collection: Wild Crossing, Barstow, California. Found walking on the ground day after rain.
2. Date of collection: July 10, 2017
3. Habitat of collection: Desert with shrubs and dried grass. 
4. Length (from head to gaster): 6mm
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture: Orange head, orange thorax, shiny orange abdomen with 4 distinct dark black stripes. Whole ant appears to be smooth with no hairs.
6. Distinguishing characteristics: Doesn't appear to have any nodes. Smooth thorax with no spines. Thorax has three humps.
7. Distinguishing behavior: Settled right into the test tube and starting cleaning herself immediately.
8. Nest description: N/A

 

0S6BJWy.png

 

Habitat: 

 

Route66-SofBarstow.jpg


Edited by Scrixx, July 12 2017 - 5:42 PM.


#3 Offline Scrixx - Posted July 14 2017 - 6:28 PM

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NQu57AF.gif

 

h0qjuBV.gif


Edited by Scrixx, July 14 2017 - 6:47 PM.


#4 Offline VoidElecent - Posted July 14 2017 - 6:31 PM

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The first one is Solenopsis invicta if I've ever seen one. The second looks like Dorymyrmex flavus to me.


Edited by VoidElecent, July 14 2017 - 6:39 PM.

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#5 Offline Scrixx - Posted July 14 2017 - 6:49 PM

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The first one is Solenopsis invicta if I've ever seen one. The second looks like Dorymyrmex flavus to me.

 

Nice! The second one definitely looks like Dorymyrmex.

 

Though the first one seems weird. Aren't solenopsis queens small? I have a S. molesta and she's 5mm long. This queen I have is 9mm long. Also the first node's shape doesn't match what I've seen in Solenopsis invicta and xyloni from ant web.

 

The first one is most likely S. invicta. Thank you! These are pretty much IDed. 
 


Edited by Scrixx, July 14 2017 - 7:04 PM.


#6 Offline gcsnelling - Posted July 15 2017 - 2:27 AM

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Not likely to be S. invicta in that habitat, they require a bit more water than you find in that area. In addition D. flavus does not occur there. We need something to scale size on that second ant, but it looks more like a Forelius to me. The head on that larger queen has me leaning towards Phediole as do the workers. A nice clean shot of the antenna would clear it up.


Edited by gcsnelling, July 15 2017 - 2:36 AM.

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#7 Offline Scrixx - Posted July 16 2017 - 9:43 PM

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Not likely to be S. invicta in that habitat, they require a bit more water than you find in that area. In addition D. flavus does not occur there. We need something to scale size on that second ant, but it looks more like a Forelius to me. The head on that larger queen has me leaning towards Phediole as do the workers. A nice clean shot of the antenna would clear it up.

 

Since the big queen was caught in my backyard, it could be S. invicta because we have green grass and many potted plants that are watered regulary. It is an urban area and most have sprinklers going regularly. Either way their end of the test tube finally dried up and the condensation is gone so I got better pictures again! With these clearer pictures it may be Pheidole. If I remember correctly someone mentioned the back of their heads look like butts. Here's an album of clear photos of the queen antennae and better pictures of workers. 

 

http://imgur.com/a/zd1u5

 

I'm not sure what you mean by scaling size on the second ant. She's 6mm long.


Edited by Scrixx, July 16 2017 - 9:45 PM.


#8 Offline gcsnelling - Posted July 17 2017 - 2:22 AM

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Ahh that does make some sense now. Yes S. invicta is in SB.



#9 Offline dspdrew - Posted July 17 2017 - 5:33 AM   Best Answer

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I too think the one from the Barstow area is probably Forelius. All the ones I've seen have those striped gasters.



#10 Offline VoidElecent - Posted July 17 2017 - 5:41 AM

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I too think the one from the Barstow area is probably Forelius. All the ones I've seen have those striped gasters.

 

Oh, that's a good point. Forelius at 6 mm would make sense.


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