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Mid-Atlantic Anting Thread


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#1 Offline VoidElecent - Posted May 18 2017 - 6:20 AM

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Similar to the Midwest and New England area anting threads, I've decided to publish one for the Mid-Atlantic area, specifically East Coast Mid-Atlantic states Like New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Of course, if you're in Maryland, Delaware or even Virginia, feel free to stop by.

1200px-US_Mid-Atlantic_states_zps16mb37f

 

The purpose of this thread is to document ant activity in the Mid-Atlantic area, if you stumble upon a flight or just see workers heavily foraging, feel free to share some of what you've found. Since it's pretty much the beginning of the anting season, I expect this thread to explode in the coming months!

 

Happy Anting!


Edited by VoidElecent, May 18 2017 - 6:14 PM.

  • noebl1, Martialis, Nathant2131 and 1 other like this
~ (16x) Prenolepis imparis ~ (2x) Crematogaster cerasi ~ (1x) Lasius neoniger ~ (1x) Brachymyrmex depilis ~ (1x) Camponotus pennsylvanicus ~ (1x) Nylanderia fiasonensis ~
 
Check out my quizzes & see how well you do! Quiz 1, Quiz 2
 
"Would you like to see Britannia rule again, my friend?

All you have to do is follow the worms.
Would you like to send our colored cousins home again, my friend?

All you need to do is follow the worms.

 

#2 Offline Evanthomas89 - Posted May 18 2017 - 8:21 AM

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I'd love to meet other's from NJ and possibly go out anting together. 

 

Howell, NJ here. 



#3 Offline VoidElecent - Posted May 18 2017 - 11:32 AM

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Nylanderia have flown heavily the past two days, Bracc. and I caught 11 queens during a flight yesterday, and another from the same area today. They're beautiful! We put two in the same tube last night to test their polygyny, and they had laid an egg within 2 hours of putting them in a test-tube setup.

 

USEP1070959_zpsbqh0us8g.jpg

USEP1070935_zpss3zyrrl0.jpg

 

Still determining whether they're N. flavipes or N. terricola, updates coming later today.

 

Blacklight arriving later today, will set it up tonight and share results.


Edited by VoidElecent, May 18 2017 - 11:33 AM.

~ (16x) Prenolepis imparis ~ (2x) Crematogaster cerasi ~ (1x) Lasius neoniger ~ (1x) Brachymyrmex depilis ~ (1x) Camponotus pennsylvanicus ~ (1x) Nylanderia fiasonensis ~
 
Check out my quizzes & see how well you do! Quiz 1, Quiz 2
 
"Would you like to see Britannia rule again, my friend?

All you have to do is follow the worms.
Would you like to send our colored cousins home again, my friend?

All you need to do is follow the worms.

 

#4 Offline Chandlerk - Posted May 18 2017 - 1:59 PM

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From Maryland.

Going out to check soon, I will post any activity or flights I observe here.

Good luck this anting season!



#5 Offline Spamdy - Posted May 18 2017 - 2:21 PM

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Grrr, no Texas anting thread...
Queens:(11) Solenopsis Invitica(1) Camponotus Pennsylvanicus<p>(5)Tetramorium Caespitum

#6 Offline VoidElecent - Posted May 18 2017 - 3:22 PM

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Bracc. and I went out today to strip bark off fallen logs in the hopes that we come across Camponotus queens who've dug chambers. We found nothing but several Tapinoma sessile satellite nests. 

 

Anyways, black light is set up. Will be hoping for Camponotus nearcticus, C. caryae, C. pennsylvanicus, C. castaneus and Colobopsis mississippiensis. May be a little early to find C. castaneus and C. mississippiensis, but I might as well try my luck.

 

edit: Been black-lighting all night, haven't found a single ant. Nathan says he caught a number of Camponotus Myrmetoma queens in MA, I'm thinking we must have missed them down here.


Edited by VoidElecent, May 18 2017 - 6:10 PM.

~ (16x) Prenolepis imparis ~ (2x) Crematogaster cerasi ~ (1x) Lasius neoniger ~ (1x) Brachymyrmex depilis ~ (1x) Camponotus pennsylvanicus ~ (1x) Nylanderia fiasonensis ~
 
Check out my quizzes & see how well you do! Quiz 1, Quiz 2
 
"Would you like to see Britannia rule again, my friend?

All you have to do is follow the worms.
Would you like to send our colored cousins home again, my friend?

All you need to do is follow the worms.

 

#7 Offline Kevin - Posted May 22 2017 - 4:12 PM

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The only thing that has flown here in South Jersey is Camponotus chromaidodes, and most of the queens died overnight because it got freezing cold out.


Still developing formicaria, we shall see what I create.


#8 Offline MrILoveTheAnts - Posted Today, 7:50 PM

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Temnothorax%20americanus%20cf.jpg

First off, I found what I'm reasonably sure is Temnothorax americanus in my yard, which is a slave maker of Temnothorax curvispinosus, so I'll have to keep an eye out for that. (I might be wrong on my ID but I'm not sure what else it is.) 

 

Secondly, the wildflowers Twinleaf, Bloodroot, and Woodland Poppy are all going to seed.

 

Twinleaf%20bloom%205.jpg

Crematogaster%20cerasi%20twinleaf%20seed

Twinleaf is odd because it would almost rather clone itself, opening with the anthers basically contacting the stigma practically. The flower itself also only lasts 8 hours to 2 good day. Sometimes bad weather makes the petals fall off, and sometimes it makes the flower close up for a day to extend the bloom time beyond two days, though no pollination actually happens unless the flower is open. In the event of pollination the packets of elaiosome on the seed will be larger though looking at the seeds I have to say there's barely any on the seeds at all.

 

Bloodroot%20double%202.jpg

Woodland%20Poppy.jpg

Bloodroot and Woodland Poppy are far better about flowering and attracting pollinators. Bloodroot flowers are open for about 4 to 7 days. Double-flowering varieties seem to last longer but forfeit reproductive structures thus producing fewer seeds. 

 

Woodland Poppy is still flowering now even though the earliest blooms have already started to form seed pods that are now sprouting open.

 

Tapinoma%20sessile%20seeds.jpg

Bloodroot seeds (left) are fat and round much like popcorn kernels. The elaiosome is long and fleshy like some sort of slug. Woodland Poppy seeds (right) are tiny.The elaiosome resembles a fleshy body of tentacles, for lack of a better term. It's like each seed is wearing a Mohawk of goo.

 

Tapinoma%20sessile%20bloodroot%20seed%20

Tapinoma%20sessile%20bloodroot%20seed%20

Tapinoma%20sessile%20bloodroot%20seed.jp

/Tapinoma%20sessile%20poppy%20seed%202.jpg.html]Tapinoma%20sessile%20poppy%20seed%202.jp[/URL]

Aphaenogaster%20rudis%20poppy%20seed%203

Tapinoma%20sessile%20poppy%20seed.jpg

Aphaenogaster%20rudis%20poppy%20seed%202

It was neat watching the ants try to handle the food. Two species, Tapinoma sessile and Aphaenogaster rudis found the seeds. A. rudis was more than capable of carrying both seeds back to their nest. T. sessile is not, however, I was surprised to see some of them were carrying the Woodland Poppy seeds home. Overall though T. sessile treated them as a food source instead of a food item. They actually cut little chunks of elaiosome and carried it off that way. 

 

Aphaenogaster%20rudis%20poppy%20seed%204

Aphaenogaster%20rudis%20poppy%20seed.jpg


Edited by MrILoveTheAnts, Today, 7:53 PM.





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