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Much ado about the founding of Lasius temporary social parasites


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#101 Offline Jamiesname - Posted July 6 2018 - 1:30 PM

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Pleased to announce that after almost two years of waiting, my Lasius latipes queen finally got her first worker.42339765745_8d93bedda7_k.jpg
 
Cigars and sugar water all around.



Congratulations, Bat! I'm sure it was exciting to see your first worker running around, especially after two years. Were you waiting that long with the same queen the entire time, or did you make several attempts for a span of two years?

#102 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted July 6 2018 - 2:07 PM

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Congratulations, Bat! I'm sure it was exciting to see your first worker running around, especially after two years. Were you waiting that long with the same queen the entire time, or did you make several attempts for a span of two years?

 

Thanks! This was a queen from September of 2016. This is the first year that her brood made it to the pupal stage, and I've been anxiously waiting to see whether males or workers would emerge. She did get a fresh batch of Lasius nearcticus pupae last year, I believe, because I wasn't willing to let the possibility of an aging workforce undo her. The workers she received originally were leftover from a failed attempt at... a Lasius aphidicolus introduction, I think? They were quite mature by the time Lasius latipes was flying.

I was a little unorthodox about introducing them. I took a sample of orphaned Lasius americanus and the Lasius nearcticus and placed them in the same foraging space with three L. latipes queens to try and give them a little choice about their host. None of the queens wanted anything to do with the L. americanus sample, but this queen went after the L. nearcticus with seeming determination. Some of the workers did not like her at all, and she killed them -- the rest accepted her. I removed the other two queens which were running around aimlessly and provided them with L. americanus callows, but in common Acanthomyops fashion, they died during hibernation.

I am quite pleased that this mite-laden queen has come so far!

I have made one other attempt at Lasius latipes in the past (the beta morph, like your own impressive queen) but all five that I captured failed. Those were some very weird queens, taken nearby their nest, all with wings attached on one side, all died statuesque and so life-like that I doubt you could previously tell by their photograph in the guide. :D Those were given mature L. aphidicolus workers, and got along without fighting, but the queens dropped off one by one.


Edited by Batspiderfish, July 6 2018 - 2:16 PM.

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If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

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#103 Online rbarreto - Posted August 2 2018 - 6:46 AM

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Anybody have any information on Formica integra? I'm having trouble finding any? I have one of these queens who has accepted two different species of Formica brood and would like to know more about this species. 

 

*EDIT* I don't know why I posted in this thread sorry  :facepalm:.


Edited by rbarreto, August 2 2018 - 6:58 AM.

My journal featuring:

Aphaenogaster picea

Lasius claviger

Lasius umbratus

Lasius sp. (black workers)

Lasius sp. (yellow/orange workers)

Formica pallidefulva (northern color form)

Prenolepis imparis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus novaeboracensis

Temnothorax cf. curvispinosus

Tetramorium immigrans ( 2 polygynous, 1 monogynous)

 


#104 Offline Jamiesname - Posted August 3 2018 - 5:45 PM

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I just wanted to post a minor observation of mine. I've noticed with my L. Interjectus that so far the only two queens that have lay eggs are coincidentally paired with L. Interjectus host workers. This leads me to believe that there may be an advantage, for those struggling with parasitic Lasius queens, to pair your queens with host workers of the same species if it is an option for you. Its also important to know that both of my queens were welcomed without incident by their host workers, while host workers of different species showed varying levels resistance. I also didn't introduce my queen's until two days after I caught the host workers so that their old queen's pheromones had a chance to weaken.

I didn't recall this being mentioned yet in this thread, so I thought I'd point it out.



Lastly, Sorry, can't help with your question, rbarreto. I will say that even though the queen has accepted two different formica brood, I think those workers will kill each other and possibly the queen by accident if/when they emerge.

#105 Online rbarreto - Posted August 3 2018 - 7:35 PM

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Thank you for trying Jamie. I've actually read many accounts of people using brood from multiple species. I think this may have worked out to my benefit because the queen seems to have eaten all the pupae from the slave maker species and kept the pupae from a fusca group species.

My journal featuring:

Aphaenogaster picea

Lasius claviger

Lasius umbratus

Lasius sp. (black workers)

Lasius sp. (yellow/orange workers)

Formica pallidefulva (northern color form)

Prenolepis imparis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus novaeboracensis

Temnothorax cf. curvispinosus

Tetramorium immigrans ( 2 polygynous, 1 monogynous)

 


#106 Offline CoolColJ - Posted September 17 2018 - 3:48 PM

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Any info on Papyrius? I believe these are an Australian parasitic species
I caught a queen of these.

Found another Papyrius queen in my backyard last week, although this one is slightly injured.
I moved her to a Iridomyrmex nest, and like with my other queen, they seem to excrete something that has a strong smell... when they encounter other ants
Then I noticed that none of the Iridomyrmex ants would actually attack her.... some would grab her and then let go immediately.

Very interesting. Might have something to do with the chemical she sprays, and does lend some weight to her being parasitic.
Anyway she eventually crawled into the nest with some prodding


queen


Workers

Edited by CoolColJ, September 17 2018 - 4:12 PM.

Current ant colonies -
1) Opisthopsis Rufithorax (strobe ant), Melophorus sp2. black and orange
Pheidole antipodum colonies...  Polyrhachis rufifemur, Camponotus suffusus bendingesis, Camponotus nigriceps, Myrmecia fulvipes, Colobopsis macrocephala
Journal = http://www.formicult...ra-iridomyrmex/

Heterotermes cf brevicatena termite pet/feeder journal = http://www.formicult...feeder-journal/

#107 Offline Jamiesname - Posted September 27 2018 - 2:26 PM

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Just had the first worker of an unidentified queen eclose today. She's likely L. Clavigar or L. Umbratus, but it's hard to tell. Here's some pics.

2018 09 27 16 07 28


2018 09 27 16 09 59


2018 09 27 16 11 59


2018 09 27 16 12 31


If anyone can tell what species by these pics feel free to do so, otherwise I'll get better ones when more workers eclose and darken in color. You'll notice this one is very pale.

#108 Offline Jamiesname - Posted October 31 2018 - 5:04 PM

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It has been a few weeks since the pic of my first unidentified parasitic lasius (above). Since then I've had several more workers enclose, and I've moved them into a new test tube for better visibility. Here's the pics of this colony today. I'm still not sure what species these are, but I'm leaning toward L. Umbratus. If anyone can tell from these pics, please let me know. FYI the queen is 7mm.

20181031 160255


20181031 160536


20181031 160027

Edited by Jamiesname, October 31 2018 - 5:05 PM.


#109 Offline DJoseph98 - Posted February 28 2019 - 10:14 AM

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How should I go about catching a wild Lasius host colony? (Just enough workers and brood to get a parasitic queen through the founding stage)



#110 Offline Canadian anter - Posted February 28 2019 - 1:30 PM

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How should I go about catching a wild Lasius host colony? (Just enough workers and brood to get a parasitic queen through the founding stage)

You can find their brood under flat rocks.

It has been a few weeks since the pic of my first unidentified parasitic lasius (above). Since then I've had several more workers enclose, and I've moved them into a new test tube for better visibility. Here's the pics of this colony today. I'm still not sure what species these are, but I'm leaning toward L. Umbratus. If anyone can tell from these pics, please let me know. FYI the queen is 7mm.

This is umbratus-group Lasius

#111 Offline Jamiesname - Posted March 19 2019 - 4:33 PM

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It has been a few weeks since the pic of my first unidentified parasitic lasius (above). Since then I've had several more workers enclose, and I've moved them into a new test tube for better visibility. Here's the pics of this colony today. I'm still not sure what species these are, but I'm leaning toward L. Umbratus. If anyone can tell from these pics, please let me know. FYI the queen is 7mm.



In case anyone out there is interested, I just heard back from The School of Ants (FSU) and this colony has been ID'd as Lasius Subglaber. If anyone is interested in getting as close to definite ID's as possible, check out their program.

#112 Offline LIFEsize - Posted April 18 2019 - 8:05 AM

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Really neat post! I'm going to attempt this with umbratus this year. Any tips on where to look for a lasius host colony in the woods perhaps?


Current Colonies:
Aphaenogaster fulva - Queen and brood
Camponotus chromaiodes - Queen and 12+ workers
Crematogaster cerasi - Queen and 2+ workers
Colobopsis impressa - 1 Queen

Lasius Umbratus - 2 Queens


#113 Offline FeedTheAnts - Posted April 18 2019 - 8:19 AM

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Really neat post! I'm going to attempt this with umbratus this year. Any tips on where to look for a lasius host colony in the woods perhaps?

I find Lasius colonies at the base of trees, usually pine. Under rocks are also a good bet. Under a rock that's at the base of a tree and you're bound to find a colony.


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