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Much ado about the founding of Lasius temporary social parasites


27 replies to this topic

#21 Offline Canadian anter - Posted April 9 2017 - 7:16 PM

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My new claviger queen is even darker than that :P


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#22 Offline MegaMyrmex - Posted May 29 2017 - 9:27 AM

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ALRIGHT! Know I know what to do with all these lasius parasites flying around!



#23 Offline Antsinmycloset - Posted July 4 2017 - 6:01 PM

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Would you say the four methods are in order from most to least risk? Are we talking proper ~40 °F refrigeration, or do you think ~65 °F in a wine cooler might be enough to take the edge off the aggression?



#24 Offline ultraex2 - Posted July 5 2017 - 8:49 AM

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I think you'll want to do proper ~40ish degrees.  65ish isn't going to do much at all.  I personally kept mine in there for 3 days before I took them back out and they had accepted.  I tried it at first for only 1 day but they fought as soon as I took them out so I put them back in.



#25 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted August 12 2017 - 11:33 AM

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Just a small update -- My Lasius latipes queen is still alive, although I'm not sure if any of the brood from earlier this summer will make it to the worker stage. The host workers she chose to infiltrate are more than a year old at this point, so I gave her more host pupae to help ensure that there are enough young workers to specialize in the care of the queen and brood. The reservoir for their tube has dried up, so I am waiting and hoping for them to move into a larger, fresh one. There are presently a small group of large larvae, smaller larvae, eggs, and host pupae.

 

My Lasius umbratus colony is producing its first parasitic workers, which are larger and darker than their flavus-group host. The host workers were slowly culling the alien workers at first, but now the host is close to being outnumbered.

 

I offered a Lasius subumbratus queen to my Lasius alienus colony which has been orphaned for about seven months. I assumed that since the workers did not have a dominant reproductive, then they would be easily receptive to a parasitic queen (the pheromones suppressing their egg-laying behavior is absent, and the workers are now tending to numerous haploid larvae). I tried to keep an eye on her, but one moment she was just running around and the next she was dead and swarmed by workers. I know that Lasius subumbratus is a social parasite of L. pallitarsis, but having founded a host-relationship using flavus and umbratus group workers in the past, I have been interested in exploring host specificity of the various parasitic species. I think I will try giving them a Lasius umbratus dealate (which prefer to parasitize L. alienus) once those start flying, just to see if the absence of a queen pheromone might override the mature and aggressive nature of these older host workers. Alternatively, host preference will be a component to any potential success, but if the workers kill the Lasius umbratus queen, then I might consider the age of the workers to be more important than those other two factors. That would be something cool to explore earnestly someday.


Black lives matter.

#26 Offline T.C. - Posted August 12 2017 - 12:56 PM

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I tried to introduce a lasius umbratus queen to a queenless lasius alienus colony. For ten minutes they were cleaning her and their appeared to be no tentions, but ten minutes later they started attacking.

Edited by T.C., August 12 2017 - 12:57 PM.


#27 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted August 12 2017 - 1:30 PM

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I kept several Lasius murphyi queens so far. I believe that they might be one of the easiest queens to keep out of the citronella species. I often provide them with L. alienus or L. nearcticus callows. All of the queens that I've kept so far laid eggs and had larvae before passing away. I believe that this species has difficulty with performing trophallaxis with their host workers.


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#28 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted August 17 2017 - 2:49 AM

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Here's a new introduction method: Sweet Introductions

1. Place a tiny drop of honey on the parasite queen's thorax

2. Place her directly in the test tube of her potential host workers

3. Workers might show aggression, but they will eventually drink off the honey. While the workers drink, the queen picks up pheromones. 


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps




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