Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  



Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use, and contain no ads for members. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo
- - - - -

Millipede ID Request (07/21/2016)


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Offline aqandres4 - Posted July 21 2016 - 6:29 PM

aqandres4

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 38 posts
  • LocationHialeah, Florida

Title:
1. Location of collection: Hialeah, Florida, U.S.A.
2. (07/21/2016)
 
Body:
1. Location of collection: Hialeah, Florida, U.S.A., on the kitchen floor.

2. Date of collection: 07/21/2016
3. Habitat of collection: It was collected on the kitchen floor inside my house.
4. I don't have an exact measurement, but it's about 50 millimeters long and like 2-3 millimeters wide. This is a guess.
5. Coloration, hue, pattern and texture: It's over-all dark red with even darker red stripes all over it.
6. Distinguishing characteristics: It's long and it's dark red color with darker red stripes.
7. Anything else distinctive: No, nothing else.


9 . Here's a picture of the top of the millipede (please click on the link): 

 

Please answer the question below, if you can. You don't have to.

 

BONUS QUESTION: Can ants eat this millipede?

 

https://gyazo.com/06...61a67938f280fc5

 

Thank you.



#2 Offline Salmon - Posted July 21 2016 - 6:46 PM

Salmon

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 245 posts
  • LocationMass, USA
Possibly a small Narceus sp. individual, though it's swollen thorax suggests sexual maturity even though Narceus are usually bigger than that. I'm not sure if two- inch Narceus americanus have developed reproductive organs like that, but if they do that's my guess.

Nearly all millipedes secrete toxins of some kind, but considering that millipedes are abundant throughout North America I'm sure at least some species have developed resistance. And it appears to be in the same subfamily (spirostreptidae I think) as that millipede in that video where the ants form a daisy chain to carry it.

EDIT: It's too thin and not stripy enough to be N. americanus. I think it's Trigoniulus corallinus.

Edited by Salmon, July 21 2016 - 6:49 PM.


#3 Offline aqandres4 - Posted July 21 2016 - 6:59 PM

aqandres4

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 38 posts
  • LocationHialeah, Florida

Possibly a small Narceus sp. individual, though it's swollen thorax suggests sexual maturity even though Narceus are usually bigger than that. I'm not sure if two- inch Narceus americanus have developed reproductive organs like that, but if they do that's my guess.

Nearly all millipedes secrete toxins of some kind, but considering that millipedes are abundant throughout North America I'm sure at least some species have developed resistance. And it appears to be in the same subfamily (spirostreptidae I think) as that millipede in that video where the ants form a daisy chain to carry it.

EDIT: It's too thin and not stripy enough to be N. americanus. I think it's Trigoniulus corallinus.

 

Thanks! By the way, I'm pretty sure it's a little bit more larger than two inches, now that I've come to think about it more.



#4 Offline mbullock42086 - Posted November 5 2017 - 7:39 AM

mbullock42086

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Trigoniulus corallinus- Scarlet red millipede



#5 Offline Hunter - Posted November 5 2017 - 7:42 AM

Hunter

    Advanced Member

  • Junior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 562 posts
  • LocationWaterboro Maine

i would not feed them as most have a gland that runs down there body



#6 Offline FeedTheAnts - Posted November 25 2017 - 5:55 PM

FeedTheAnts

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,013 posts
  • LocationVirginia

I highly doubt that ants would eat Millipedes.


I like Coldplay and Radiohead B)                                       My Journals - 2017-18 - 2019                

Spoiler

 

     


#7 Offline Salmon - Posted November 25 2017 - 6:03 PM

Salmon

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 245 posts
  • LocationMass, USA

I highly doubt that ants would eat Millipedes.

 

Likely true for most ants...definitely not all.

 


  • FeedTheAnts likes this

#8 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted November 26 2017 - 6:56 AM

AnthonyP163

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 570 posts
  • LocationWaukesha, Wisconsin.

Hi, everyone. I looked up Trigoniulus corallinus, and it's a species found in Asia. It's invasive in Hawaii and some of the Caribbean, but I doubt it would be in Florida if it's a species from Asia. 

 

I'm pretty sure it's a much more common species, Chicobolus spinigerus. Which is the Florida Ivory Millipede. 


Edited by AnthonyP163, November 26 2017 - 7:00 AM.

Boycott the Ants & Antkeeping discord server. Find alternatives wherever you can and avoid the totalitarian mods there.


#9 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted November 26 2017 - 7:16 AM

Connectimyrmex

    Advanced Member

  • Junior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,864 posts
  • LocationAvon, Connecticut

Wait. That does look a lot like Trigoniulus! I would see those all over the tennis courts back in Hawaii.

You are probably right, though (with Chicobolus).


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#10 Offline Salmon - Posted November 26 2017 - 1:06 PM

Salmon

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 245 posts
  • LocationMass, USA

Hi, everyone. I looked up Trigoniulus corallinus, and it's a species found in Asia. It's invasive in Hawaii and some of the Caribbean, but I doubt it would be in Florida if it's a species from Asia. 

 

I'm pretty sure it's a much more common species, Chicobolus spinigerus. Which is the Florida Ivory Millipede. 

 

No, T. corallinus has been introduced to and is quite common in Florida. Besides that, there's more large millipede species in Florida than just these two and it looks nothing like Chicobolus.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users