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How To Find and Catch Queen Ants

find catch ant queen queen mating flight trap founding chamber blacklight black light pool crystals guide tutorial

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#21 Offline Ants4fun - Posted April 24 2018 - 7:39 AM

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Has flushing out an established nest of ants with a combination of lemon, distilled vinegar and water poured into the entrance been effective in obtaining queens, eggs and larvae?

 

No offense, but that seems like a terrible idea. I don't think that has been effective. Although, sometimes people are able to flood out fire ants from their nests.



#22 Offline antsinmypants - Posted April 24 2018 - 8:32 AM

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I ask b/c I saw a YouTube vid last week, and it eventually brought out a queen. Seems better than tearing up Mother Earth and working up a sweat while attracting undue attention from the public. Also the materials used are biodegradable and, I hope, not toxic but only obnoxious to the ants. I suppose it would be akin to ice fishing, sitting back and waiting for your surprise catch to come up to the surface.


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#23 Offline Ants4fun - Posted April 24 2018 - 10:01 AM

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I ask b/c I saw a YouTube vid last week, and it eventually brought out a queen. Seems better than tearing up Mother Earth and working up a sweat while attracting undue attention from the public. Also the materials used are biodegradable and, I hope, not toxic but only obnoxious to the ants. I suppose it would be akin to ice fishing, sitting back and waiting for your surprise catch to come up to the surface.

That would only work with certain ants. Many ants in North America don't relocate the colony when it rains, or there is flooding. Perhaps the air pockets within the nest keep it drier. It will only work with ants such as Solenopsis Invicta, which are native to the Amazon region, where flooding brings the water lever tens of feet high for a large period of time. It might work for founding queens/colonies, but more than likely they'll stay put.



#24 Offline CoolColJ - Posted April 29 2018 - 5:29 AM

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maybe blowing air into the nests could work - ants hate airflow in the nest


Edited by CoolColJ, April 29 2018 - 5:29 AM.

Current ant colonies -
1) Opisthopsis Rufithorax (strobe ant), Melophorus sp2. black and orange
Pheidole antipodum colonies...  Polyrhachis rufifemur, Camponotus suffusus bendingesis, Camponotus nigriceps, Myrmecia fulvipes, Colobopsis macrocephala
Journal = http://www.formicult...ra-iridomyrmex/

Heterotermes cf brevicatena termite pet/feeder journal = http://www.formicult...feeder-journal/

#25 Offline Ants_Texas - Posted April 29 2018 - 11:40 AM

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Has flushing out an established nest of ants with a combination of lemon, distilled vinegar and water poured into the entrance been effective in obtaining queens, eggs and larvae?

Sadly, no. I tried this multiple times when I was new to the hobby, and it never worked. Don't waste your time.


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My YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCK90shiLguOZBECXtwr1M7A

 

Colonies:

 

Camponotus festinatus, Camponotus fragilis, Camponotus sansabeanus, Crematogaster minutissima, Pheidole moerens, and Solenopsis invicta.

 

Queens: 

 

Aphaenogaster sp., Brachymyrmex patagonicus, Colobopsis impressa, Crematogaster laeviuscula, Forelius mccooki, Solenopsis molesta, and Solenopsis sp.


#26 Offline dermy - Posted April 29 2018 - 1:13 PM

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Has flushing out an established nest of ants with a combination of lemon, distilled vinegar and water poured into the entrance been effective in obtaining queens, eggs and larvae?

For us in the North I find putting a nice flat rock overtop a Colony of ants and waiting for mid-day to flip said rock over can yield a queen or two from some species, such as Myrmica.

[note: this only works in Early Spring]


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#27 Offline lucifer007 - Posted July 9 2018 - 3:05 PM

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Will try to download a black light on my phone next time i go looking for some queen ants thank you!



#28 Offline DaveJay - Posted July 19 2018 - 2:26 AM

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Has flushing out an established nest of ants with a combination of lemon, distilled vinegar and water poured into the entrance been effective in obtaining queens, eggs and larvae?

I saw a video a while back, it might be the same one but I thought only lemon juice and water was used. It's worth pointing out that it was done to a nest in concrete and he chipped away to make sure that the liquid went into the nest properly. Sure enough though, the ants packed up and left. First workers found a new spot, then came workers carrying brood followed eventually by the Queen and her euntriage.
It did seem like a very passive way to collect a colony (or part thereof ).

Edit, I should also make it clear that it was just one average cup (200ml) of liquid, not enough to flood them out you'd think otherwise you could just use a hose.
Last year I had ants in a tomato pot and no way could I get them to move just using water, believe me I tried.

Edited by DaveJay, July 19 2018 - 2:31 AM.


#29 Offline CoolColJ - Posted July 19 2018 - 4:15 AM

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blasting air into the nest can get ants to move, well it sure triggers them :)
Current ant colonies -
1) Opisthopsis Rufithorax (strobe ant), Melophorus sp2. black and orange
Pheidole antipodum colonies...  Polyrhachis rufifemur, Camponotus suffusus bendingesis, Camponotus nigriceps, Myrmecia fulvipes, Colobopsis macrocephala
Journal = http://www.formicult...ra-iridomyrmex/

Heterotermes cf brevicatena termite pet/feeder journal = http://www.formicult...feeder-journal/

#30 Offline Guy_Fieri - Posted December 12 2018 - 7:44 PM

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Great info, I’ll make sure to keep this in mind when looking for queens.

Edited by Guy_Fieri, December 21 2018 - 7:25 AM.


#31 Offline Thebrute99 - Posted February 13 2019 - 5:12 PM

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Has flushing out an established nest of ants with a combination of lemon, distilled vinegar and water poured into the entrance been effective in obtaining queens, eggs and larvae?

I have seen a lot about this I have never got it to work

Edited by Thebrute99, February 13 2019 - 5:13 PM.






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