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Northern Serbia-7th of September, 2019.


Best Answer Manitobant , September 9 2019 - 6:58 AM

Oh my God that's a super rare find! Proceratium are semi claustral and will eat the eggs of other insects so if you have any other queens you can give her a few of their eggs. They are also very high humidity so I recommend putting some soil in her test tube. Good luck! Go to the full post


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#1 Offline GeorgeK - Posted September 8 2019 - 11:57 PM

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1. Location (on a map) of collection: Northern Serbia
2. Date of collection: 7th of September
3. Habitat of collection: Below clay tile, in ground
4. Length (from head to gaster): 3-4mm
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture: Brownish-orange.
6. Distinguishing characteristics: ‚‚hook'' shaped gaster
7. Distinguishing behavior: /
8. Nest description: She was found below a clay tile while I was removing stuff from yard

9. Nuptial flight time and date: Probably in september

 

M7vgny5.jpg

HZqs5SQ.jpg


Edited by GeorgeK, September 8 2019 - 11:58 PM.

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#2 Online Martialis - Posted September 9 2019 - 4:21 AM

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This is something Amblyoponine I think. Nice find!

I’ll ID to genus when I can get to a computer.


Actually, it might not be. 


Edited by Martialis, September 9 2019 - 6:31 AM.

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#3 Offline NickAnter - Posted September 9 2019 - 6:12 AM

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Looks like Proceratium.
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Colonies:
Nylanderia vividula
Pheidole navigans
Camponotus hyatti
Founding queens:   Lasius cf.americanus, Solenopsis molesta, Temnothorax cf. nevadnsis, , Camponotus vicinus, Pogonomyrmex californicus, and a Leptothorax species.


#4 Online Martialis - Posted September 9 2019 - 6:35 AM

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I agree with Proceratium.


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#5 Offline Manitobant - Posted September 9 2019 - 6:58 AM   Best Answer

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Oh my God that's a super rare find! Proceratium are semi claustral and will eat the eggs of other insects so if you have any other queens you can give her a few of their eggs. They are also very high humidity so I recommend putting some soil in her test tube. Good luck!
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#6 Offline ForestDragon - Posted September 9 2019 - 12:21 PM

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Proceratium 100% I had one this season but she died, presumably infertile



#7 Offline AntsBC - Posted September 10 2019 - 8:50 AM

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Proceratium melinum looks right to me. Proceratium algiricum is the other option.


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#8 Offline ponerinecat - Posted September 10 2019 - 2:47 PM

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Proceratium! Hope she does well, someone on discord has successfully raised one to larvae.



#9 Offline AntsDakota - Posted September 10 2019 - 4:06 PM

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I didn't know these existed in Siberia. The region just must be undocumented for the most part.


Edited by AntsDakota, September 10 2019 - 4:07 PM.

"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version

 

 


#10 Offline NickAnter - Posted September 10 2019 - 5:27 PM

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I didn't know these existed in Siberia. The region just must be undocumented for the most part.

Its not Siberia, its Serbia! Completely different. They are thousands of miles apart, so Serbia is warmer.

Colonies:
Nylanderia vividula
Pheidole navigans
Camponotus hyatti
Founding queens:   Lasius cf.americanus, Solenopsis molesta, Temnothorax cf. nevadnsis, , Camponotus vicinus, Pogonomyrmex californicus, and a Leptothorax species.


#11 Offline AntsDakota - Posted September 11 2019 - 6:10 AM

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I didn't know these existed in Siberia. The region just must be undocumented for the most part.

Its not Siberia, its Serbia! Completely different. They are thousands of miles apart, so Serbia is warmer.

 

Oh, silly me!  :lol:


Edited by AntsDakota, September 11 2019 - 6:10 AM.

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"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version

 

 





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