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Photo
* * - - - 1 votes

ID this queen from walla walla Washington


40 replies to this topic

#1 Offline camponotuskeeper - Posted July 10 2019 - 3:29 PM

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I found 3 of these queens in my pool, they are black and shiny with creamy band their abdomen, and are about 9 millimeters long. Sorry no photos
Cause I can’t upload them from my iPad

#2 Offline Zeiss - Posted July 10 2019 - 3:31 PM

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When making an ID request, refer to the obviously pinned topic at the top of the ID Request thread.  You will not get an ID without pictures.

 

You should be perfectly able to upload your photos from your ipad to the forum's gallery.  I am able to upload images like that on my cellphone.


Edited by Zeiss, July 10 2019 - 3:54 PM.


#3 Offline camponotuskeeper - Posted July 10 2019 - 3:55 PM

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In can do that but the tool bar where the my media button is is not on my screen

#4 Offline camponotuskeeper - Posted July 10 2019 - 4:13 PM

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image
image

here are the pics


Edited by camponotuskeeper, July 10 2019 - 4:14 PM.


#5 Offline rbarreto - Posted July 10 2019 - 4:58 PM

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Tetramorium immigrans


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My journal featuring:

Aphaenogaster picea

Lasius claviger

Lasius umbratus

Lasius sp. (black workers)

Lasius sp. (yellow/orange workers)

Formica pallidefulva (northern color form)

Prenolepis imparis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus novaeboracensis

Temnothorax cf. curvispinosus

Tetramorium immigrans ( 2 polygynous, 1 monogynous)

 


#6 Offline camponotuskeeper - Posted July 10 2019 - 5:40 PM

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Thanks

#7 Offline Zeiss - Posted July 10 2019 - 5:41 PM

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Tetramorium immigrans is invasive in the U.S. and should be killed.



#8 Offline camponotuskeeper - Posted July 10 2019 - 5:47 PM

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Okay this is about the only ants I see but I think there are camponotus in a couple logs in my yard and these really tiny worker ants that are about 2 millimeters smaller than tetramorium workers

#9 Offline Zeiss - Posted July 10 2019 - 5:50 PM

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Okay this is about the only ants I see but I think there are camponotus in a couple logs in my yard and these really tiny worker ants that are about 2 millimeters smaller than tetramorium workers

You would have to post pictures and follow ID Request formatting for those to be IDed well.



#10 Offline rbarreto - Posted July 10 2019 - 6:05 PM

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Aren't they established?
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My journal featuring:

Aphaenogaster picea

Lasius claviger

Lasius umbratus

Lasius sp. (black workers)

Lasius sp. (yellow/orange workers)

Formica pallidefulva (northern color form)

Prenolepis imparis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus novaeboracensis

Temnothorax cf. curvispinosus

Tetramorium immigrans ( 2 polygynous, 1 monogynous)

 


#11 Offline camponotuskeeper - Posted July 10 2019 - 6:07 PM

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I think so cause they are all around my yard and every year we get tons of alates in my pool

#12 Offline Zeiss - Posted July 10 2019 - 6:21 PM

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Just because they're here doesn't mean they should be.  Invasive (meaning present, but not native) species shouldn't be outside of their natural habitat.  



#13 Offline rbarreto - Posted July 10 2019 - 7:53 PM

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They've been here for 200 years so they're pretty much established at this point. Yes they are extremely dominant in urban environments but that's pretty much about it. Not to mention they actually kill Solenopsis invicta colonies.

http://entnemdept.uf...avement_ant.htm

Edited by rbarreto, July 10 2019 - 7:56 PM.

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My journal featuring:

Aphaenogaster picea

Lasius claviger

Lasius umbratus

Lasius sp. (black workers)

Lasius sp. (yellow/orange workers)

Formica pallidefulva (northern color form)

Prenolepis imparis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus novaeboracensis

Temnothorax cf. curvispinosus

Tetramorium immigrans ( 2 polygynous, 1 monogynous)

 


#14 Offline camponotuskeeper - Posted July 10 2019 - 8:23 PM

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Is solenopsis invicta invasive?

#15 Offline rbarreto - Posted July 10 2019 - 8:24 PM

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Extremely

My journal featuring:

Aphaenogaster picea

Lasius claviger

Lasius umbratus

Lasius sp. (black workers)

Lasius sp. (yellow/orange workers)

Formica pallidefulva (northern color form)

Prenolepis imparis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus novaeboracensis

Temnothorax cf. curvispinosus

Tetramorium immigrans ( 2 polygynous, 1 monogynous)

 


#16 Offline Mdrogun - Posted July 10 2019 - 8:25 PM

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Invasive (meaning present, but not native) species shouldn't be outside of their natural habitat.  

You're seriously one of the most helpful and knowledgeable people on this forum, but I'm sorry, this is wrong.

 

species can be introduced but not invasive. They only become invasive when they are introduced, spread prolifically and destructively. It's kind of an arbitrary term, and I would definitely agree T. immigrans is invasive, but I just like to be a stickler to definitions  :wacko1: .

 

They've been here for 200 years so they're pretty much established at this point. Yes they are extremely dominant in urban environments but that's pretty much about it. Not to mention they actually kill Solenopsis invicta colonies.

http://entnemdept.uf...avement_ant.htm

Their dominance in urban and suburban environments is unparalleled and destructive to local populations of ants. If your house was burning down would you throw more matches on it cause "eh, it's already on fire, doesn't really matter."? Probably not.

 

I don't understand your argument that they're OK because they kill Solenopsis invicta. All that tells me is that Tetramorium immigrans is a more destructive and threatening invasive species than Solenopsis invicta.


Edited by Mdrogun, July 10 2019 - 8:26 PM.

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Ready for Nuptial flights!


#17 Offline camponotuskeeper - Posted July 10 2019 - 8:25 PM

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Haha just looked it over up and found out it was the invasive fire ant

#18 Offline EchoMeter4 - Posted July 10 2019 - 8:30 PM

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Tetramorium immigrans is established and poses no big threat now, Mdrogun



#19 Offline Zeiss - Posted July 10 2019 - 8:32 PM

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Invasive (meaning present, but not native) species shouldn't be outside of their natural habitat.  

You're seriously one of the most helpful and knowledgeable people on this forum, but I'm sorry, this is wrong.

 

species can be introduced but not invasive. They only become invasive when they are introduced, spread prolifically and destructively. It's kind of an arbitrary term, and I would definitely agree T. immigrans is invasive, but I just like to be a stickler to definitions  :wacko1:

You don't have to apologize, everyone is wrong (fairly often in my case), haha.  I thought "invasive" was just a general term for exotic species in non-native locations.  


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#20 Offline Zeiss - Posted July 10 2019 - 8:34 PM

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Tetramorium immigrans is established and poses no big threat now, Mdrogun

I believe this statement is false, as they are still fairly destructive to native ant populations.  Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm sure they are still a problem.






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