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Discothyrea testacea


26 replies to this topic

#21 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted July 23 2019 - 7:12 PM

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Poneriencat, I have my sights set on one species: Stigmatomma trigonignathum.  I plan on taking a weekend camping trip to North Carolina where I believe it is distributed specifically to try to find this species and hopefully a colony, so if Lady Luck has been with me so far, perhaps she will smile on me for this species. 

Good luck with that! Stigmatomma trigonagnathum is one of the rarest ants in existence, with the holotype discovered in 1948 and an accidental discovery in 2008. If you do manage to find a colony of this species, you will be one of the luckiest anters in existence!


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#22 Offline ponerinecat - Posted July 24 2019 - 12:59 PM

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Poneriencat, I have my sights set on one species: Stigmatomma trigonignathum.  I plan on taking a weekend camping trip to North Carolina where I believe it is distributed specifically to try to find this species and hopefully a colony, so if Lady Luck has been with me so far, perhaps she will smile on me for this species. 

Good luck with that! Stigmatomma trigonagnathum is one of the rarest ants in existence, with the holotype discovered in 1948 and an accidental discovery in 2008. If you do manage to find a colony of this species, you will be one of the luckiest anters in existence!

 

There's actually quite a lot of "rarest ants in existence." Mostly  cryptobiotic, like martialis, but also some above-ground genera.



#23 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted July 24 2019 - 9:00 PM

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Poneriencat, I have my sights set on one species: Stigmatomma trigonignathum.  I plan on taking a weekend camping trip to North Carolina where I believe it is distributed specifically to try to find this species and hopefully a colony, so if Lady Luck has been with me so far, perhaps she will smile on me for this species. 

Good luck with that! Stigmatomma trigonagnathum is one of the rarest ants in existence, with the holotype discovered in 1948 and an accidental discovery in 2008. If you do manage to find a colony of this species, you will be one of the luckiest anters in existence!

 

There's actually quite a lot of "rarest ants in existence." Mostly  cryptobiotic, like martialis, but also some above-ground genera.

 

That I know. There are quite a few ants that have been collected only once, unlike twice like Stigmatomma trigonignathum.


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#24 Offline ponerinecat - Posted July 25 2019 - 8:40 AM

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Poneriencat, I have my sights set on one species: Stigmatomma trigonignathum.  I plan on taking a weekend camping trip to North Carolina where I believe it is distributed specifically to try to find this species and hopefully a colony, so if Lady Luck has been with me so far, perhaps she will smile on me for this species. 

Good luck with that! Stigmatomma trigonagnathum is one of the rarest ants in existence, with the holotype discovered in 1948 and an accidental discovery in 2008. If you do manage to find a colony of this species, you will be one of the luckiest anters in existence!

 

There's actually quite a lot of "rarest ants in existence." Mostly  cryptobiotic, like martialis, but also some above-ground genera.

 

That I know. There are quite a few ants that have been collected only once, unlike twice like Stigmatomma trigonignathum.

 

Fun fact: martialis was actually collected twice as well. They just lost the ant.



#25 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted July 25 2019 - 5:51 PM

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Poneriencat, I have my sights set on one species: Stigmatomma trigonignathum.  I plan on taking a weekend camping trip to North Carolina where I believe it is distributed specifically to try to find this species and hopefully a colony, so if Lady Luck has been with me so far, perhaps she will smile on me for this species. 

Good luck with that! Stigmatomma trigonagnathum is one of the rarest ants in existence, with the holotype discovered in 1948 and an accidental discovery in 2008. If you do manage to find a colony of this species, you will be one of the luckiest anters in existence!

 

There's actually quite a lot of "rarest ants in existence." Mostly  cryptobiotic, like martialis, but also some above-ground genera.

 

That I know. There are quite a few ants that have been collected only once, unlike twice like Stigmatomma trigonignathum.

 

Fun fact: martialis was actually collected twice as well. They just lost the ant.

 

Yeah, I remember hearing about that. I've lost a few rare ants in the past myself. I lost a Strumigenys membranifera queen last year, which isn't too bad considering I now have a colony with at least three queens and then two separate queens, and also considering they're the most common Strumigenys in my area. Not too long after that I also lost the on Hypoponera ergatoid male I've ever seen.


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#26 Offline PurdueEntomology - Posted August 11 2019 - 12:16 AM

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Update:  Well the colony is doing fine so far. The alate pupae eclosed but were all female no males.  Some did not make it but that was expected. I have found that these ants will eat Pheidole eggs.  I have not been able to secure and small spider species eggs that would be manageable for this small ant so I tested some of the eggs from various ant queens I have collected and have found that Discothyrea testacea will accept the eggs of Pheidole, though I have not determined the species it is one found in same local as the D. testacea


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#27 Offline ponerinecat - Posted August 11 2019 - 9:47 AM

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Update:  Well the colony is doing fine so far. The alate pupae eclosed but were all female no males.  Some did not make it but that was expected. I have found that these ants will eat Pheidole eggs.  I have not been able to secure and small spider species eggs that would be manageable for this small ant so I tested some of the eggs from various ant queens I have collected and have found that Discothyrea testacea will accept the eggs of Pheidole, though I have not determined the species it is one found in same local as the D. testacea

That's new. I thought they only ate spiders and centipedes.






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