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Three queens found in pool - Glendale, Arizona, USA - 6-19-2019 - 7:30 P.M.


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#1 Offline Herdo - Posted June 19 2019 - 8:52 PM

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1. Found floating in my pool, Glendale, Arizona.

 

2. 6-19-2019


3.Suburban environment.

 

4. 6mm - 7mm


5. Reddish-brown head and thorax with a lighter reddish-brown (almost orange) gaster.  Gaster has a few darker stripes.


6. Two petiole present.  


7. Seem to not be too bothered by my presence or by bright lights.  All three removed their wings shortly after being removed from the pool.

 

9. All three were caught between 7:30 and 7:45 P.M


 

Photos right now aren't great.  Unfortunately the test tubes were very wet on the inside so it's hard to get decent photos with my microscope or macro lens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hopefully I can get some clearer pictures after the humidity regulates in the tube a bit more.

 

Fairly certain they are Solenopsis, and possibly Solenopsis amblychila.



#2 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted June 19 2019 - 9:01 PM

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Almost certainly Solenopsis amblychila.


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#3 Offline Herdo - Posted June 19 2019 - 9:22 PM

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Almost certainly Solenopsis amblychila.


Ah that's a shame. Everything I've read says these are parasitic and I have no workers to give them.

Thank you!

Edited by Herdo, June 19 2019 - 9:22 PM.


#4 Offline Aaron567 - Posted June 20 2019 - 8:56 AM

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Surely you have some S. xyloni colonies nearby that you can steal brood from. You probably wouldn't need to get her workers because their pupae are not encased in cocoons and don't necessarily need the assistance of workers to open them up. I think that's more of a thing for Lasius parasites. I feel like it'd be worth it to at least try, especially because of how beautiful S. amblychila is.


Edited by Aaron567, June 20 2019 - 9:02 AM.

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#5 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted June 20 2019 - 9:00 AM

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Surely you have some S. xyloni colonies nearby that you can steal brood from. You probably wouldn't need to get her workers because their pupae are not encased in cocoons and don't necessarily need the assistance of workers to open them up. I think that's more of a thing for Lasius parasites. I feel like it'd be worth it to at least try, especially because of how beautiful S. aurea is.


Solenopsis amblychila were renamed?
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#6 Offline Aaron567 - Posted June 20 2019 - 9:02 AM

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Surely you have some S. xyloni colonies nearby that you can steal brood from. You probably wouldn't need to get her workers because their pupae are not encased in cocoons and don't necessarily need the assistance of workers to open them up. I think that's more of a thing for Lasius parasites. I feel like it'd be worth it to at least try, especially because of how beautiful S. aurea is.


Solenopsis amblychila were renamed?

 

I meant to say amblychila. Got the desert species mixed up


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#7 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted June 20 2019 - 9:03 AM

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Surely you have some S. xyloni colonies nearby that you can steal brood from. You probably wouldn't need to get her workers because their pupae are not encased in cocoons and don't necessarily need the assistance of workers to open them up. I think that's more of a thing for Lasius parasites. I feel like it'd be worth it to at least try, especially because of how beautiful S. aurea is.


Solenopsis amblychila were renamed?
I meant to say amblychila. Got the desert species mixed up

Ah, ok. :lol:
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#8 Offline ponerinecat - Posted June 20 2019 - 11:10 AM

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Did you name the last one Lafawrduh?



#9 Offline Herdo - Posted June 20 2019 - 11:55 AM

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I'll look around, but other than queens, I haven't actually seen an active colony of ants yet this year. I went way out into the desert twice now and haven't seen a single ant, haha.

Did you name the last one Lafawrduh?


Lafawnduh
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#10 Offline Manitobant - Posted June 20 2019 - 1:57 PM

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Even though solenopsis xyloni doesn't have pupae encased in cocoons, I would probably still use the callow method in order to get her to lay, as its effective with almost all social parasites including those that can also be done with pupae like formica. I recommend reading the guide to founding lasius parasites as that has some information and founding methods that should still apply to amblychila: http://www.formicult...+lasius +social

And one more thing: there has got to be some solenopsis xyloni colonies around your area since you caught an alate the other day. I recommend looking around in parks or under stones as fire ants thrive in man made habitats. Be sure to wear gloves though as big xyloni colonies are aggressive and their stings pack a punch!

Edited by Manitobant, June 20 2019 - 1:59 PM.

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#11 Offline Herdo - Posted June 21 2019 - 9:01 AM

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Thanks for the info everyone. I haven't seen anything yet, but I'll keep looking.

Even though solenopsis xyloni doesn't have pupae encased in cocoons, I would probably still use the callow method in order to get her to lay, as its effective with almost all social parasites including those that can also be done with pupae like formica. I recommend reading the guide to founding lasius parasites as that has some information and founding methods that should still apply to amblychila: http://www.formicult...+lasius +social
And one more thing: there has got to be some solenopsis xyloni colonies around your area since you caught an alate the other day. I recommend looking around in parks or under stones as fire ants thrive in man made habitats. Be sure to wear gloves though as big xyloni colonies are aggressive and their stings pack a punch!


So is that the issue? That she don't start laying without developed brood/workers? I've been reading that these may not require host workers and I'm just wondering what would be the signal that they aren't going to make it without them.
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#12 Offline Manitobant - Posted June 21 2019 - 11:00 AM

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You can kinda tell she is parasitic by her thin stature and smaller gaster and large head. Many people have tried raising this species and have only had sucess with host workers. These queens will probably either die or never lay eggs without them. Also, queens have been seen infiltrating or already in wild solenopsis xyloni colonies meaning that they must be parasitic. Also, I suggest reading drew's solenopsis amblychila journal:http://www.formicult...4-discontinued/

Edited by Manitobant, June 21 2019 - 11:06 AM.

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