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Glendale (Phoenix), Arizona 6-12-2019

pheidole solenopsis queen

Best Answer Manitobant , June 12 2019 - 11:31 AM

Definitely not pheidole. That is a queen of the dark form of solenopsis xyloni, the southern fire ant. You're in for a ride as these girls have almost unmatched growth speed and aggression. Expect about 150-500 workers in 6 months. Go to the full post


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Herdo - Posted June 12 2019 - 10:57 AM

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1. Location (on a map) of collection:

Glendale/North Phoenix, Arizona

2. Date of collection:

June 12th 2019

3. Habitat of collection:

My backyard floating in my pool around 10:45 A.M.

4. Length (from head to gaster):

She was moving a lot and had her gaster curled up so an exact measurement was impossible, but the best measurement I got while she was in the test tube was 6mm - 7mm.

5. Color, hue, pattern and texture:

Dark brown, dark reddish brown, and black. No distinct separate coloring; for instance the thorax is both reddish brown and dark brown/black.

6. Distinguishing characteristics:

Two petiole. Small lightly colored hairs on gaster.

7. Distinguishing behavior:

Nothing abnormal. Initially docile due to being in the pool, but got fairly active once she dried out. Started cleaning herself immediately. Wings still attached, but that's not uncommon for the queens found in my pool.

8. Nest description: N/A

9. Nuptial flight time and date: N/A. She was the only queen I found and I didn't see any flying. 10:45 A.M.

[Images of ant]

https://photos.app.g...YhEd3ABQC8odfM8

Let me know if this link doesn't work. I'm trying to avoid reuploading to another host.

Considering I didn't see any others around, I'm thinking she may not have even mated.

My initial thinking was Solenopsis, but after taking some macro photos I'm not so sure. Possibly another Pheidole? She does look very similar to all those other Pheidole I've been catching.

Edited by Herdo, June 12 2019 - 11:01 AM.


#2 Offline Martialis - Posted June 12 2019 - 11:03 AM

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This definitely looks like a Pheidole.

 

Nope.


Edited by Martialis, June 12 2019 - 4:21 PM.

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#3 Offline Herdo - Posted June 12 2019 - 11:18 AM

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This definitely looks like a Pheidole.


Thanks for the reply. I had the same thought after looking closely at the photos I took. After all the Pheidole alates I've caught, I still can't easily distinguish them from the Solenopsis species we have here in Phoenix.

Looks like it might be another year of 200+ Pheidole queens, haha.
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#4 Online Manitobant - Posted June 12 2019 - 11:31 AM   Best Answer

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Definitely not pheidole. That is a queen of the dark form of solenopsis xyloni, the southern fire ant. You're in for a ride as these girls have almost unmatched growth speed and aggression. Expect about 150-500 workers in 6 months.
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#5 Offline Acutus - Posted June 12 2019 - 11:35 AM

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Definitely not pheidole. That is a queen of the dark form of solenopsis xyloni, the southern fire ant. You're in for a ride as these girls have almost unmatched growth speed and aggression. Expect about 150-500 workers in 6 months.

 

WOW!  :blink:  :blink:  :blink:  :blink: 


Billy

 

Currently keeping:

Camponotus chromaiodes

Camponotus castaneus

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Aphaenogaster "NOT tennesseensis" fulva

Formica subsericea


#6 Offline Herdo - Posted June 12 2019 - 12:18 PM

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Definitely not pheidole. That is a queen of the dark form of solenopsis xyloni, the southern fire ant. You're in for a ride as these girls have almost unmatched growth speed and aggression. Expect about 150-500 workers in 6 months.


Haha, well I'm just going to release her then. As fun as that sounds, I don't want to deal with the headache of trying to contain these things.

Mikey from AntsCanada seems to be constantly fighting to keep his colony contained and fed. Every video is "Hey guys, my fire ant colony got out again and ate my dog this time!" lol.

Thanks for the confirmation.

By the way, what specifically tells you this it Solenopsis?
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#7 Online Manitobant - Posted June 12 2019 - 1:31 PM

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Definitely not pheidole. That is a queen of the dark form of solenopsis xyloni, the southern fire ant. You're in for a ride as these girls have almost unmatched growth speed and aggression. Expect about 150-500 workers in 6 months.


Haha, well I'm just going to release her then. As fun as that sounds, I don't want to deal with the headache of trying to contain these things.
Mikey from AntsCanada seems to be constantly fighting to keep his colony contained and fed. Every video is "Hey guys, my fire ant colony got out again and ate my dog this time!" lol.
Thanks for the confirmation.
By the way, what specifically tells you this it Solenopsis?
you shouldn't release her. This species isn't as crazy as geminata or invicta and isn't as much of an escape artist. Its basically a toned down version of them. As for how I know its solenopsis, pheidole queens usually have a large head and your queen also has a light patch on the head which is characteristic of dark form xyloni. You could also sell her if ya want.
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#8 Offline Herdo - Posted June 12 2019 - 3:26 PM

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Definitely not pheidole. That is a queen of the dark form of solenopsis xyloni, the southern fire ant. You're in for a ride as these girls have almost unmatched growth speed and aggression. Expect about 150-500 workers in 6 months.


Haha, well I'm just going to release her then. As fun as that sounds, I don't want to deal with the headache of trying to contain these things.
Mikey from AntsCanada seems to be constantly fighting to keep his colony contained and fed. Every video is "Hey guys, my fire ant colony got out again and ate my dog this time!" lol.
Thanks for the confirmation.
By the way, what specifically tells you this it Solenopsis?
you shouldn't release her. This species isn't as crazy as geminata or invicta and isn't as much of an escape artist. Its basically a toned down version of them. As for how I know its solenopsis, pheidole queens usually have a large head and your queen also has a light patch on the head which is characteristic of dark form xyloni. You could also sell her if ya want.

Ok thanks. I probably will hang on to her then.

#9 Offline gcsnelling - Posted June 12 2019 - 4:20 PM

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If this is indeed the dark S. xyloni the colonies I have seen were not as populous as the red form. Still about as aggressive though.

I say it again, learning the simple key feature makes all the difference in the world when it comes to figuring out what you have found, for Solenopsis the very distinct two segmented antennal clue is a dead give away.


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