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Ant ID North Georgia


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#1 Offline Annexis - Posted June 11 2019 - 2:18 PM

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1. Location (on a map) of collection: Atlanta Georgia suburbs... Found under a recycling bin outside. Very dark/moist. 
2. Date of collection: June 11th 2019
3. Habitat of collection: 
4. Length (from head to gaster): 9mm? but has really long legs. 
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture: Black, lanky but not large. 
6. Distinguishing characteristics: Really fast, with long legs like a water bug. Skinny too. 
7. Distinguishing behavior: Super fast, not great climber, large spread apart legs. 
8. Nest description: None that I could find. 

9. Nuptial flight time and date: June 11th 2019 :)

https://imgur.com/gallery/IB5049T

 

I found this ant, and at first glance I thought it was a male elate. I've never seen it before and it reminds me of an ant qeen I found when I looked up ant species I didn't know that lived in georgia. Please ID the ant if you can (or need better pictures, I can try) see if its a Male or a Queen. The biggest determinate would be if it shed its wings I guess. 

 



#2 Offline AntsBC - Posted June 11 2019 - 3:08 PM

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It is a queen. At 9mm, the closest match would be Pachycondyla harpax. The pictures aren't the greatest though, so it's hard to say. 

 

At the very least, she is a member of the Ponerinae subfamily, and she is semi-claustral. This means you will have to feed her throughout the founding stages. 

 

AntsAustralia made a great tutorial on raising semi-claustral queens, I suggest you check it out here.


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#3 Offline Annexis - Posted June 11 2019 - 3:14 PM

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It is a queen. At 9mm, the closest match would be Pachycondyla harpax. The pictures aren't the greatest though, so it's hard to say. 

 

At the very least, she is a member of the Ponerinae subfamily, and she is semi-claustral. This means you will have to feed her throughout the founding stages. 

 

AntsAustralia made a great tutorial on raising semi-claustral queens, I suggest you check it out here.

This is the first one I've ever seen ever. that's so cool! ill make sure to do that. May need to release her though due to me not being in town much for the next month... Damn



#4 Offline Aaron567 - Posted June 12 2019 - 6:31 AM

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Brachyponera chinensis. Extremely abundant species in that area. 


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#5 Offline Annexis - Posted June 12 2019 - 6:44 AM

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Brachyponera chinensis. Extremely abundant species in that area. 

oh yeah that's it. I've seen a lot of the workers, never seen any queens though. The queen is still semi claustral right? 



#6 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted June 12 2019 - 6:45 AM

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Brachyponera chinensis. Extremely abundant species in that area.

oh yeah that's it. I've seen a lot of the workers, never seen any queens though. The queen is still semi claustral right?

Yes.




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