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Cephalotes varians Riparium


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12 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted June 6 2019 - 8:44 AM

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As some of you may know, I'm going to the Florida Keys soon, and thanks to information provided by several people, I have found out it is legal to transport ants across state borders, and the one species I really have my eye on is Cephalotes varians. I have some really nice plans for their formicarium, and I'm set on a final design. A Red Mangrove swamp riparium, complete with mangrove roots and live Red Mangrove Trees. I'm going to order the Mangroves tonight, and I should be getting them before I leave for Florida on June 14th. I've already got the riparium all set up. I've set up the root system, the limestone, vines, and even a turtle shell. I'm just waiting for the water to clear so I can decorate it. I'm probably let the plants get all settled in for a few months before the introduction of the ants. I will be keeping the ants in a lab-style setup until the end of the summer when I introduce them to the riparium. I will be collecting some hollow twigs from Florida to put into the riparium for the ants to nest in. I will most likely be collecting twigs inhabited by another species, like Crematogaster or Colobopsis and get them out somehow and into another twig. I'm really excited to finish up the riparium and get the ants into it in a few months. I will post pictures once the riparium is completed.


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#2 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted June 6 2019 - 8:47 AM

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Are the laws the same way in Tennessee?

#3 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted June 6 2019 - 9:06 AM

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Are the laws the same way in Tennessee?

You'd have to look it up, cause I'm not entirely sure.


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#4 Offline Martialis - Posted June 6 2019 - 9:26 AM

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"A PPQ 526 permit is required for the importation, interstate movement and environmental release of most insects and mites that feed upon or infest plants or plant products, including agricultural crops, trees, shrubs, native plants, etc."

 

 

https://www.aphis.us...ites/CT_Insects

 

Cephalotes is arboreal. It most certainly "infests" trees.

 

 

§330.200   Movement of plant pests regulated; permits required.
 

No person shall knowingly move any plant pest into or through the United States from any place outside thereof, or interstate, or knowingly accept delivery of any plant pest so moving unless such movement is authorized under permit under this part and is made in accordance with the conditions therein and the provisions in this part. The movement of snails and slugs, as well as other plant pests, is governed by such provisions. Biological specimens of plant pests, in preservative or dried, may be imported without further restriction under this part, but subject to inspection on arrival in the United States to confirm the nature of the material and freedom from risk of plant pest dissemination.

 

 

This section is where APHIS gets its regulations.

 

This is an excerpt from the Plant Protection Act. 

Although it may say "commerce," the USDA and APHIS have interpreted this to mean the movement of plant pests. Period.

Under the Plant Protection Act of 2000, a plant pest is defined as any living stage of any of the following that can directly or indirectly injure, cause damage to, or cause disease in any plant or plant product: a protozoan, nonhuman animal, parasitic plant, bacterium, fungus, virus or viroid, infectious agent or other pathogen, or any article similar to or allied with any of those articles including unidentified organisms associated with infected plant parts. A PPQ permit is required for the importation, domestic movement and environmental release of any living organism that falls within this definition. Regulations on the issuance of permits for plant pests are found in 7 CFR 330.2.

 

 

 

 

 

You cannot legally move Cephalotes interstate without a permit.

 

 

Edit: here is the web page upon which APHIS regulates their list of regulated plant pests. Cephalotes are regulated under both Myrmicinae and Formicidae in these listings:

 

med_gallery_1053_1550_14576.png

 

Link: https://www.aphis.us...rppl/rppl-table


Edited by Martialis, June 6 2019 - 9:38 AM.

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#5 Offline Martialis - Posted June 6 2019 - 9:42 AM

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For some reason, though, Camponotus don’t have a listing separate from the blanket one... bureaucracy at its finest, I guess.
:/

Edited by Martialis, June 6 2019 - 9:44 AM.

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#6 Offline VenomousBeast - Posted June 6 2019 - 9:50 AM

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I guess by this logic, ponerine ants are exceptions :lol: Specifically Stigmatomma pallipes as I'm obsessed with them but then again, all ants are classified under Formicidae so... None


Edited by VenomousBeast, June 6 2019 - 9:53 AM.

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-Haden Lee
Keeps:

NATIVE: Crematogaster sp -16  Formica palledefulva-1  Stigmatomma pallipes-7  Formica integra-1  Camponotus casteanus-1  Tetramorium immigrans-1  

NON-NATIVE: Solenopsis invicta- 2 Atta texana-2-3

 

 

Hornets: Dolichovespula maculata-1 (Bald faced hornets-self raised from queen, over 300 workers now!)


#7 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted June 6 2019 - 12:13 PM

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I guess I'll have to cancel the project then.  :*(


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#8 Offline Acutus - Posted June 6 2019 - 12:23 PM

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You don't have to cancel everything! the Setup sounds Awesome and I'd love to see pics! Just find a local species that will appreciate the same setup! you like climbing trees I'm sure you'll find some species! :D :D


Billy

 

Currently keeping:

Camponotus chromaiodes

Camponotus castaneus

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Aphaenogaster "NOT tennesseensis" fulva


#9 Offline Acutus - Posted June 6 2019 - 12:26 PM

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"A PPQ 526 permit is required for the importation, interstate movement and environmental release of most insects and mites that feed upon or infest plants or plant products, including agricultural crops, trees, shrubs, native plants, etc."

 

 

https://www.aphis.us...ites/CT_Insects

 

Cephalotes is arboreal. It most certainly "infests" trees.

 

 

§330.200   Movement of plant pests regulated; permits required.
 

No person shall knowingly move any plant pest into or through the United States from any place outside thereof, or interstate, or knowingly accept delivery of any plant pest so moving unless such movement is authorized under permit under this part and is made in accordance with the conditions therein and the provisions in this part. The movement of snails and slugs, as well as other plant pests, is governed by such provisions. Biological specimens of plant pests, in preservative or dried, may be imported without further restriction under this part, but subject to inspection on arrival in the United States to confirm the nature of the material and freedom from risk of plant pest dissemination.

 

 

This section is where APHIS gets its regulations.

 

This is an excerpt from the Plant Protection Act. 

Although it may say "commerce," the USDA and APHIS have interpreted this to mean the movement of plant pests. Period.

Under the Plant Protection Act of 2000, a plant pest is defined as any living stage of any of the following that can directly or indirectly injure, cause damage to, or cause disease in any plant or plant product: a protozoan, nonhuman animal, parasitic plant, bacterium, fungus, virus or viroid, infectious agent or other pathogen, or any article similar to or allied with any of those articles including unidentified organisms associated with infected plant parts. A PPQ permit is required for the importation, domestic movement and environmental release of any living organism that falls within this definition. Regulations on the issuance of permits for plant pests are found in 7 CFR 330.2.

 

 

 

 

 

You cannot legally move Cephalotes interstate without a permit.

 

 

Edit: here is the web page upon which APHIS regulates their list of regulated plant pests. Cephalotes are regulated under both Myrmicinae and Formicidae in these listings:

 

med_gallery_1053_1550_14576.png

 

Link: https://www.aphis.us...rppl/rppl-table

 

 

ALL of this needs to be pinned in a topic somewhere. Especially the Links! thanks so much for doing the leg work! :D


Billy

 

Currently keeping:

Camponotus chromaiodes

Camponotus castaneus

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Aphaenogaster "NOT tennesseensis" fulva


#10 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted June 6 2019 - 12:31 PM

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"A PPQ 526 permit is required for the importation, interstate movement and environmental release of most insects and mites that feed upon or infest plants or plant products, including agricultural crops, trees, shrubs, native plants, etc."

 

 

https://www.aphis.us...ites/CT_Insects

 

Cephalotes is arboreal. It most certainly "infests" trees.

 

 

§330.200   Movement of plant pests regulated; permits required.
 

No person shall knowingly move any plant pest into or through the United States from any place outside thereof, or interstate, or knowingly accept delivery of any plant pest so moving unless such movement is authorized under permit under this part and is made in accordance with the conditions therein and the provisions in this part. The movement of snails and slugs, as well as other plant pests, is governed by such provisions. Biological specimens of plant pests, in preservative or dried, may be imported without further restriction under this part, but subject to inspection on arrival in the United States to confirm the nature of the material and freedom from risk of plant pest dissemination.

 

 

This section is where APHIS gets its regulations.

 

This is an excerpt from the Plant Protection Act. 

Although it may say "commerce," the USDA and APHIS have interpreted this to mean the movement of plant pests. Period.

Under the Plant Protection Act of 2000, a plant pest is defined as any living stage of any of the following that can directly or indirectly injure, cause damage to, or cause disease in any plant or plant product: a protozoan, nonhuman animal, parasitic plant, bacterium, fungus, virus or viroid, infectious agent or other pathogen, or any article similar to or allied with any of those articles including unidentified organisms associated with infected plant parts. A PPQ permit is required for the importation, domestic movement and environmental release of any living organism that falls within this definition. Regulations on the issuance of permits for plant pests are found in 7 CFR 330.2.

 

 

 

 

 

You cannot legally move Cephalotes interstate without a permit.

 

 

Edit: here is the web page upon which APHIS regulates their list of regulated plant pests. Cephalotes are regulated under both Myrmicinae and Formicidae in these listings:

 

med_gallery_1053_1550_14576.png

 

Link: https://www.aphis.us...rppl/rppl-table

 

Yes, Cephalotes varians certainly is arboreal, but it does not "infest" trees as you state. Cephalotes varians is not a pest by any means. It effects the trees it inhabit in no way shape or form. It only inhabits already dead and hollow twigs that have been hollowed out by beetle larva and then carve out a hole that perfectly matches the shape and size of the soldier's head, which does not harm the tree. They are not pests at all.

 

Also, could you take a look at this post and give me your thoughts on it? I'm just curious, and you seem to be very experienced in this sort of stuff.

 

http://www.formicult...ting +discovery


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#11 Offline Acutus - Posted June 6 2019 - 12:40 PM

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Problem is the Federal Employee that knocks on your door to fine you isn't going to know or care. It's what "They" say that counts. If it's in the tree it's infesting the tree.

 

I deal with this crap all the time with Birds of Prey. When it comes down to it it's not worth the hassle it can cause. "That's my opinion of course". :D


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Billy

 

Currently keeping:

Camponotus chromaiodes

Camponotus castaneus

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Aphaenogaster "NOT tennesseensis" fulva


#12 Offline Manitobant - Posted June 6 2019 - 5:52 PM

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You don't have to cancel everything! the Setup sounds Awesome and I'd love to see pics! Just find a local species that will appreciate the same setup! you like climbing trees I'm sure you'll find some species! :D :D

do what he said. Colobopsis would work wonders in that setup as they also nest in branches and have majors to plug nest holes. Pseudomyrmex would be good too!

Edited by Manitobant, June 7 2019 - 7:25 AM.

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#13 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted June 6 2019 - 5:54 PM

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You don't have to cancel everything! the Setup sounds Awesome and I'd love to see pics! Just find a local species that will appreciate the same setup! you like climbing trees I'm sure you'll find some species! :D :D

do what he said. Colobopsis would work wonders in that setup as they also nest in branches and have majors to plug best holes. Pseudomyrmex would be good too!

 

I could probably actually house both species in the riparium, as I typically find them in close proximity anyway.


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