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Desert Ants In Arid Areas of the Sierras?


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#1 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 16 2019 - 5:31 PM

NickAnter

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So, I go on a trip to a very arid area of the Eastern Sierras every year, and I have been wondering whether or not desert species could be there. I am taking about species like Pheidole gilvescens or Myrmecocystus, as they have been spotted in areas south of the area. I am simply curious, as it would mean, if yes, that I should probably study them. All opinions are welcome!

Edited by NickAnter, May 16 2019 - 5:32 PM.

Currently keeping:             

Camponotus hyatti (1, single queen, 1 worker.)                     "Keep your eyes on the stars and your feet on the ground." -Theodore Roosevelt

                                                                                              "Either you will control your government, or government will control you." -Ronald Reagan

                                                                                "Leadership is the art is getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it." -                                                                                   Dwight  D. Eisenhower

                        

 

Currently founding:

---Solenopsis molesta(1 tube with 20 queens)

---Monomorium ergaognya(1) Pheidole navigans(2 separate queens) Hypoponera sp. (2 separate queens)

Hoping to get soon:Camponotus fragilis,Lasius pallitarsis and brevicornis,Formica argentea,Stigmatomma pallipes/oregonense and maybe Camponotus laevigatus or vicinus


#2 Offline VoidElecent - Posted May 17 2019 - 11:02 AM

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I visited my uncle who owns a mountain house near Lake Tahoe a few years back, and all we really saw were large Camponotus and Aphaenogaster, presumably Camponotus laevigatus and Aphaenogaster occidentalis. I think at one point we may have spotted a Manica sp. worker, but I may be mistaken. We were at approximately ~6500 ft elevation and the area was heavily forested, however, so I wouldn't be surprised if the east Sierras were a completely different case.



#3 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 17 2019 - 5:37 PM

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The area I go to is maybe 30-40 miles south of Lake Tahoe, and is quite arid.  We camp next to a creek, and around the creek( up to30 yards away from)there was Camponotus modoc, parasitic Formica, Dorymyrmex insanus, Pogonomyrmex, Lasius, and Formica argentea. However, last time that i went, I was not as interested in ants, and did not look for small, nocturnal species, such as Pheidole, or other, more cryptic genuses, like Aphaenogaster.  The altitude there is also about 6500 feet, but if go much farther away from the creek, it is practically a desert. 


Currently keeping:             

Camponotus hyatti (1, single queen, 1 worker.)                     "Keep your eyes on the stars and your feet on the ground." -Theodore Roosevelt

                                                                                              "Either you will control your government, or government will control you." -Ronald Reagan

                                                                                "Leadership is the art is getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it." -                                                                                   Dwight  D. Eisenhower

                        

 

Currently founding:

---Solenopsis molesta(1 tube with 20 queens)

---Monomorium ergaognya(1) Pheidole navigans(2 separate queens) Hypoponera sp. (2 separate queens)

Hoping to get soon:Camponotus fragilis,Lasius pallitarsis and brevicornis,Formica argentea,Stigmatomma pallipes/oregonense and maybe Camponotus laevigatus or vicinus





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