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NickAnter's Camponotus hyatti Journal


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#1 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 12 2019 - 4:40 PM

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So, to start off, I have had this queen since March 23, and because she has not been heated (no heating cable :ugone2far:), does she now only have a 4rth instar larva. I have her housed in a Mini-Hearth, in which she has laid lots of eggs, and, as she has been hiding in the area where the nestmate plugs in, I have not been able to track their development. It was not until just a few minutes ago that I saw this large larva, about the size of an Argentine ant, slightly longer. It was because of this that I did not make a journal, for fear that she would be infertile, even having been collected under a concrete slab. This concrete slab being at my uncle's wedding. I have, however, solved the not being heated problem by placing her atop my X-box, which constantly emits heat. I will next update this when the larva pupates, which, by my estimates will be fairly soon. Pictures will come with workers. I know that, according to Antmaps, C. discolor is uncommon in California, but the coloration and size fits perfectly, when I post pictures, I will start an ID thread.

Edited by NickAnter, May 23 2019 - 6:54 PM.


#2 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 13 2019 - 4:17 PM

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Okay, a small update; she moved away from the nestmate area, so that means that I an check on her brood.  It appears that most of her original eggs were trophic, as I can now see that she still has that large larva, and only three to five eggs. 



#3 Offline ANTdrew - Posted May 13 2019 - 4:39 PM

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Good luck with this queen! I’ve never even seen this species before.

"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25


#4 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 13 2019 - 4:43 PM

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It is possible that it is a color variant of Camponotus clarithorax, but it's habitat and color, to me, makes it seem like it is C. discolor.



#5 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 14 2019 - 1:57 PM

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Okay, so, a quick update: the larva has pupated! :D

Edit; One of those three eggs I mentioned in the previous update post has now turned into a third or fourth instar larva :o


Edited by NickAnter, May 14 2019 - 2:52 PM.


#6 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 15 2019 - 4:26 PM

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That new larva I mentioned is now pupating, I do not see how they have developed this fast, unless it was the sudden addition of heat that caused this, or humidity requirements finally being met. edit, she took the sand off of it, or ate it because there is not a pupa in there, only a fairly large larva.  IDK why this happened.


Edited by NickAnter, May 17 2019 - 3:32 PM.


#7 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 18 2019 - 7:40 AM

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Still nothing to report, except that the pupa is starting to darken, I can't wait for workers!



#8 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 19 2019 - 2:39 PM

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Update: the larva that I said was not pupating, well, it had, it was just that I did not get a good look at it, so I could not see that it was an excerate pupa. I am thinking about putting this into a Formicinae in ae journal, where I would log all Formicines. I would also make some for Dolichoderines, Myrmicines, and Ponerines.

#9 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 21 2019 - 5:48 PM

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The original pupa is getting darker and darker! I can't wait for workers!

#10 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 22 2019 - 5:02 PM

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This has got to be one of the most productive queens ever! She has since laid about fifteen eggs which overnight are now larvae, first or second instar. I can't see how she still has the reserves to feed these new larvae!

#11 Offline Aaron567 - Posted May 22 2019 - 5:16 PM

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It's probably one of California's other Myrmentoma species. Camponotus discolor's distribution is centered more around Texas and parts of the eastern US and aren't likely found in California. A 1941 publication of a list of California's ants has discolor as the subspecies name in a few taxa but this was back when North American Myrmentoma species were unresolved. If yours do look a lot like discolor you can probably consider bakeri, hyatti, or sayi.



#12 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 23 2019 - 6:04 AM

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I think I might have a strange color morph of one of these species, as my queen has a blood red head, but a brilliantly bright scarlet thorax. It was found in a very shaded area under a huge oak tree, one of many.

#13 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 23 2019 - 5:39 PM

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I wonder whether this could be a lighter version of C. Hyatti, like I originally thought upon capture. My guess is that because they were in a shaded area, the color was possibly affected, as many ants which are subterranean, are pale. It is also possible that it is just a C. Bakeri or sayi which was found much further inland than usual, but with a much darker head

#14 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 23 2019 - 6:52 PM

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I am quote sure that this is C. Hyatt, the redheaded version, which YsTheAnt posted on YouTube.




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