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Camponotus Flight Questions


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#1 Offline Dethundrel - Posted May 2 2019 - 6:49 PM

Dethundrel

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It’s about time for Camponotus to fly in my area. We have had a lot of rain here lately and it has been quite cool. I am in Grand Junction Colorado, 4,500 elevation.

I am curious if anyone has had much luck with them flying under 80 degrees? We have had a few warm day after the rain (75ish) and I have been checking nests fairly frequently, but have hardly seen any activity at all. Most of them time I only see 2-3 workers at sites that had dozens crawling around them last year.

Even with lots of rain previously, it’s expected to die down but we are only expecting temps in the high 60’s and low 70’s for the next several weeks. Am I ok to just chill and wait for it to warm up more, or should I still bother to check them every other day or so?

There are really only 2 huge nests that I know of and a few other smaller ones so I assume I will have a very limited time and amount of queens that I will be able to catch and I don’t want to miss them.

We have both C. Pennsylvanicus and C. Novaeboracensis here.
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#2 Offline ConcordAntman - Posted May 15 2019 - 8:59 AM

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Dethundrel, it seems we’ve got the same lousy weather pattern here in Massachusetts. I’ve got the same question. I’ve got C. pennsylvanicus but I’m looking for C. americanus or chromaiodes. I checked out dpsdrew’s Queen Ant Spotting/Mating chart for North America http://www.formicult...rth-america.htmand thought I was late for the party but a local collector with a lot more experience than me said the bigger Camponotus species won’t fly until it’s warmer http://www.formicult...hread/?p=114404 I know we’re 2000 miles apart but for poikilotherms, temperature is temperature! Good luck with your hunt.

#3 Offline CloudtheDinosaurKing - Posted May 15 2019 - 9:09 AM

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Edited by CloudtheDinosaurKing, May 15 2019 - 9:10 AM.

                   Current Colonies:                                                                                                                                                         

 

  • Aphaenogaster carolinensis; 1 queen, >35 workers
  • Aphaenogaster lamellidens; 1 queen, 20 workers
  • Aphaenogaster miamiana; 1 queen, >50 workers
  • Brachymyrmex patagonicus; 7 queens
  • Brachyponera chinensis; 8 queens
  • Brachyponera chinensis; 1 queen, >15 workers
  • Camponotus americanus; 1 queen
  • Camponotus castaneus; 1 queen
  • Camponotus nearcticus; 4 queens
  • Camponotus nearcticus; 1 queen, >5 workers
  • Camponotus nearcticus; 1 queen, 18 workers
  • Camponotus snellingi; 2 queens
  • Camponotus snellingi; 1 queen, 33 workers
  • Colobopsis impressa; queenless for the time being, >45 workers
  • Colobopsis mississippiensis; 1 queen
  • Colobopsis mississippiensis; 1 queen, 2 workers
  • Colobopsis mississippiensis; 1 queen, >25 workers
  • Crematogaster ashmeadi; 1 queen
  • Solenopsis invicta; 10 queens
  • Strumigenys louisianae; 1 queen, 1 worker
  • Temnothorax curvispinosus; 13 queens
  • Trachymyrmex septentrionalis; 1 queen, >200 workers

 

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