Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  



Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use, and contain no ads for members. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo
- - - - -

Digging or capturing wild colonies


  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#21 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted May 20 2019 - 4:45 PM

Ferox_Formicae

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 832 posts
  • LocationSouth Carolina, United States

On Saturday, I dug up a colony of Trachymyrmex septentrionalis, and it was surprisingly easy and took only a few hours. It was a species I see very rarely, and I could not go without collecting this colony of beautiful ants. Most of the colonies I have are actually wild, but they were all fairly easy to collect. I only collect them if they are relatively easy to collect or rare.


  • Ant_Dude2908 likes this

Spoiler

#22 Offline rbarreto - Posted May 20 2019 - 4:53 PM

rbarreto

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 583 posts
  • LocationOttawa, On

On Saturday, I dug up a colony of Trachymyrmex septentrionalis, and it was surprisingly easy and took only a few hours. It was a species I see very rarely, and I could not go without collecting this colony of beautiful ants. Most of the colonies I have are actually wild, but they were all fairly easy to collect. I only collect them if they are relatively easy to collect or rare.


Why would you not just wait for the nuptial flight? Uprooting an established colony for your own selfish needs isn't going to help the species become less "rare".

Edited by rbarreto, May 20 2019 - 4:53 PM.

  • mike.omeg likes this

My journal featuring most of my ants.

My other journal featuring Formica Bradleyi.

Check our my store here!


#23 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 20 2019 - 5:06 PM

NickAnter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 720 posts
  • LocationOrange County, California
This is not to support either side, but he can collect them if he wants, and I will not agree nor disagree. This thread was also created not to argue, but to simply see people's thoughts or experiences. It is also possible that he does not live anywhere near the area where these were collected, so he may not have an option to wait for a nuptial flight. I do not want to contradict either view. So I am simply trying to make sure this thread stays peaceful by trying to show that there may be reasons for actions you disagree with.
  • Ant_Dude2908, Ferox_Formicae and Acutus like this

Colonies:
Nylanderia vividula
Pheidole navigans
Camponotus hyatti
Founding queens:   Lasius cf.americanus, Solenopsis molesta, Temnothorax cf. nevadnsis, , Camponotus vicinus, Pogonomyrmex californicus, and a Leptothorax species.


#24 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted May 21 2019 - 6:43 AM

Ant_Dude2908

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,546 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tennessee

On Saturday, I dug up a colony of Trachymyrmex septentrionalis, and it was surprisingly easy and took only a few hours. It was a species I see very rarely, and I could not go without collecting this colony of beautiful ants. Most of the colonies I have are actually wild, but they were all fairly easy to collect. I only collect them if they are relatively easy to collect or rare.

Why would you not just wait for the nuptial flight? Uprooting an established colony for your own selfish needs isn't going to help the species become less "rare".
These ants are not "rare" by any means. They are simply not easily found. They are slow moving, blend in with leaf litter, and are very small ants. I personally live by many nests of this species. Nuptial flights are not always an option for this species either. Sometimes the only way to go get ants going is to capture small colonies.

Edited by Ant_Dude2908, May 21 2019 - 6:45 AM.

  • Ferox_Formicae likes this

#25 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted May 21 2019 - 6:45 AM

Ferox_Formicae

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 832 posts
  • LocationSouth Carolina, United States

 

On Saturday, I dug up a colony of Trachymyrmex septentrionalis, and it was surprisingly easy and took only a few hours. It was a species I see very rarely, and I could not go without collecting this colony of beautiful ants. Most of the colonies I have are actually wild, but they were all fairly easy to collect. I only collect them if they are relatively easy to collect or rare.


Why would you not just wait for the nuptial flight? Uprooting an established colony for your own selfish needs isn't going to help the species become less "rare".

 

I may be away during their nuptial flights, and capturing the queens during their flights is problematic, as most of the time when you find queens walking around, they have already dug a claustral cell and spat out their fungus. They're just foraging. Also, once this colony produces alates, I will free them.


  • Ant_Dude2908 likes this

Spoiler

#26 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted May 21 2019 - 6:46 AM

Ant_Dude2908

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,546 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tennessee

On Saturday, I dug up a colony of Trachymyrmex septentrionalis, and it was surprisingly easy and took only a few hours. It was a species I see very rarely, and I could not go without collecting this colony of beautiful ants. Most of the colonies I have are actually wild, but they were all fairly easy to collect. I only collect them if they are relatively easy to collect or rare.


Why would you not just wait for the nuptial flight? Uprooting an established colony for your own selfish needs isn't going to help the species become less "rare".
I may be away during their nuptial flights, and capturing the queens during their flights is problematic, as most of the time when you find queens walking around, they have already dug a claustral cell and spat out their fungus. They're just foraging. Also, once this colony produces alates, I will free them.

At that point, I would follow her back to her cell after giving her a piece of food, then dig her up.
  • Ferox_Formicae likes this

#27 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted May 21 2019 - 6:52 AM

Ferox_Formicae

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 832 posts
  • LocationSouth Carolina, United States

 

At that point, I would follow her back to her cell after giving her a piece of food, then dig her up.

 

Yeah, that would work.


  • Ant_Dude2908 likes this

Spoiler

#28 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted May 21 2019 - 6:56 AM

Ant_Dude2908

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,546 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tennessee
She probably won't wander far from her nest.
  • Ferox_Formicae likes this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users