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A Thorough Tutorial on Raising Parasitic and Slave Raiding Formica

formica parasitic slave raiding antsbc tutorial

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#1 Offline AntsBC - Posted March 25 2019 - 10:58 AM

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A Thorough Tutorial on Raising Parasitic and Slave Raiding Formica spp.

 

I know that BatSpiderFish already made a thread similar to this, for Lasius, but there are a few different rearing techniques for raising parasitic Formica (especially for slave raiding Formica, which I will get into later), and the host species that you use for these different species/groups, so I decided to make this thread. Hopefully, some of this info can help those who are wanting to keep parasitic or slave raiding Formica or those who are just struggling at raising them.

 

Now I know a lot of you already know what a parasitic/slave-making ant is, but for the sake of the newer ant keeper, I will include a description about it here as well. If you already know what a parasitic or slave raiding ant is, feel free to skip this part of the thread.

 

Types of Social Parasites:

 

“There are three main types of social parasites that form mixed species ant nests: temporary social parasites, permanent inquilines, and slave-makers” (Deslippe).

 

Temporary social parasites:

 

“Temporary social parasites depend on a host species only during the establishment of new colonies. Usually the parasitism is initiated by young queens following their insemination in a mating flight. The queens try to penetrate host colonies, replace the original queens, and gain acceptance by the workers. The parasitic queens then lay eggs that develop, with the care of the host colony workers, into a worker force of their own offspring. Eventually the host workers die leaving only the parasitic queens and their offspring. As a result, a mature colony contains only members of the parasitic species” (Deslippe).

 

Permanent inquilines:

 

“Whereas temporary social parasites typically kill the host queens, queens of permanent inquilines are usually tolerant of the host queens. With a few exceptions, inquilines do not produce worker offspring, but instead invest most of their energy into producing eggs that eventually develop into sexual forms. Despite the burden, the host queens continue to produce worker offspring and so the mixed species colony is permanent. The host workers simultaneously rear the brood of both the parasitic and non-parasitic queens” (Deslippe). I’m not sure if there are any parasitic Formica that do this, but I will include it here anyways.

 

Slave Raiders:

 

“The antics of the slave-makers have made them a favorite among myrmecologists. Besides initiating their nests much like the temporary social parasites, the slave-makers also raid other ant colonies to steal the brood. The pilfered larvae and pupae that are not consumed eventually eclose into worker slaves that are chemically imprinted and completely integrated into the society of their enslavers. The slaves tend brood, gather food, feed their enslavers, care for the queen, and defend the nest against threats. If the colony moves to a new location, the slaves carry their enslavers to their new nest. Sometimes, the slaves even participate with the slave-making workers in slave raids against other ant colonies of their own or closely related species” (Deslippe).

 

There are three groups of temporary socially parasitic Formica: the F. rufa group, the F. microgyna group, and the F. exsecta group. Also, there is one group of slave raiding Formica: the F. sanguinea group. I will cover the temporary social parasites first and then the slave raiders after.

 

 

Parasitic Groups

 

 

(Formica s. str) Formica rufa Group:

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Formica obscuripes, By Sean McCann

 

Keys Including this Group:

 

North American Species include (synonyms have been left out):

 

Formica aterrima, Formica calviceps, Formica ciliata, Formica coloradensis, Formica comata, Formica criniventris, Formica dakotensis, Formica ferocula, Formica fossaceps, Formica integra, Formica integroides, Formica laeviceps, Formica mucescens, Formica obscuripes, Formica obscuriventris, Formica oreas, Formica planipilis, Formica prociliata, Formica propinqua, Formica ravida, Formica reflexa, and Formica subnitens.

 

Eurasian Species Include (synonyms have been left out):

 

Formica adelungi, Formica approximans, Formica aquilonia, Formica dusmeti, Formica kupyanskayaeFormica lugubris, Formica opaca, Formica paralugubris, Formica polyctena, Formica pratensis, Formica rufa, Formica truncorum, Formica sinensis, Formica frontalis, Formica yessensis, Formica uralensis, and Formica wongi.

 

Hosts: Serviformica, Neoformica, or more specifically a Formica fusca group species.

 

Diet: These ants are very fond of honey, sugar water, and other sweet carbohydrates. They will also openly accept most insects and arachnids. Furthermore, member species of the F. rufa group particularly enjoy Lepidoptera larvae, and many species will hunt in trees for them. 

 

Distinguishing Characteristics/Biology:

 

The Formica rufa group is best known for the massive mounds which included species create in the wild. For the most part, they are made out of sticks, leaf litter, grass blades, and other organic material. Most species live in the forest, but some live in grasslands as well. Workers are usually polymorphic, but they do only have one distinct worker caste. Most of the included species have red and black coloration. Queen and worker size varies greatly amongst the included species. Nuptial flights generally occur early into the anting season; as then the queens have lots of time to find host colonies. Colony founding usually includes dealate queens seeking out host colonies, killing the host queen, and then using the remaining host worker force to raise her brood. The host worker force will slowly die out, leaving only the parasitic queen and her workers. Some species will accept dealate queens back into the nest. Colonies can be polygynous (having multiple queens) and polydomous (having multiple nests per colony).

 

Tips/tricks on Raising Species in This Group: These ants really need nests with good ventilation. They also have a very distinct relationship with their environment and their success, so I find it's a good idea to introduce some naturalistic elements to their nest (Eg. Dirt/twigs for them to decorate their test tube with). These ants also benefit greatly from having a constant supply of carbohydrates, such as honey or sugar water.

 

 

(Formica s. str) Formica microgyna Group

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Formica densiventris Queen, By Gary Alpert

 

Keys Including this Group:

 

 

North American Species Include (synonyms have been left out):

 

Formica adamsi, Formica densiventris, Formica difficilis, Formica dirksi, Formica impexa, Formica indianensis, Formica knighti, Formica microgyna, Formica morsei, Formica nepticula, Formica nevadensis, Formica postoculata, Formica querquetulana, Formica scitula, Formica spatulata, and Formica talbotae.

 

Hosts: Serviformica, or more specifically a member species of the F. fusca or F. neogagates group.

 

Distinguishing Characteristics/Biology (Note: There are very little resources available on the F. microgyna group, I tried my best to gather the information I could):

 

The Formica microgyna group is believed to have evolved from the F. rufa group. Key differences between the two include size; workers and queens (especially queens) of the F. microgyna group are generally quite smaller than those of the F. rufa group, and habitat; the F. rufa group prefers forests while the F. microgyna group prefers grasslands and prairies. F. microgyna group queens are usually very slender looking, too. Member species of the F. microgyna reproduce and create new colonies like the F. rufa group; colony founding usually includes dealate queens seeking out host colonies, killing the host queen, and then using the remaining host worker force to raise her own brood.

 

 

(Coptoformica) Formica exsecta Group

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Formica ulkei Queen and worker with F. podzolica and F. aserva Host Workers, By Crystal S

 

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Formica exsecta Queen Alate and workers, By Hayley Wiswell

 

Keys Including this Group:

 

North American Species Include (synonyms have been left out):

 

Formica exsectoides, Formica opaciventris, and Formica ulkei.

 

Eurasian Species Include (synonyms have been left out):

 

Formica bruni, Formica exsecta, Formica manchu, Formica mesasiatica, Formica fukaii, Formica fennica, Formica pressilabris, Formica foreli, Formica forsslundi, Formica pisarskii, and Formica suecica.

 

Hosts: Serviformica or more specifically a Formica fusca group species.

 

Distinguishing Characteristics/Biology:

 

All member species of the F. exsecta group possess a distinct concave posterior cephalic margin.

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Member species of this group are mound builders like the other parasitic Formica spp. They prefer to nest in forests and will create multi nest supercolonies like those of the F. rufa group. They create new colonies like the rest of the parasitic Formica groups, and they do let queens back into their nests.

 

Raising Parasitic Formica:

 

Parasitic Formica queens generally fly earlier in the anting year, with the bulk of them flying from April - late July; so keep an eye out for them in those months. They fly earlier in the year so the queens will have time to seek out a host colony to infiltrate, before dispause.

 

The key difference between raising parasitic Lasius vs. Formica is the fact that for the most part, parasitic Formica spp. can open pupae, while parasitic Lasius cannot. So, instead of using methods of host worker introduction right away, you can offer your queen some pupae first. Personally, I like to use a four step method for raising parasitic Formica. I have used this method in the past with success so I would recommend using it. This method incorporates introducing pupae first and then workers later if the queen failed to open the pupae, (so if you would prefer to introduce workers right away, see BSF’s guide on introducing host workers to parasitic Lasius) (The methods are the same for Formica).

 

So, without further ado, let’s get into it:

 

My method:

 

  1. Find your queen and feed her some honey/sugar water. (Parasitic queens are generally malnourished inside their home colony, so it's always a good idea to feed your queen just to make sure she’ll have some extra energy for acquiring her host workers).

 

  1. Go out and find some host pupae. Parasitic Formica queens generally parasitize Formica fusca group colonies, so I would look for them as a start. Although, IDing your queen would help a lot on that front; as then you can be more exact on your queen's host species. Once you find a colony of your queen’s host species, I would suggest collecting around 30 pupae and 10 workers (host workers may come in handy later). Remember, you can always go back for more pupae later.

 

  1. Make a mini setup for your new host workers. Personally, I like to make small naturalistic setups, but a test tube would do the job as well.

 

  1. Grab a few (4-8) pupae from your host colonies’ setup and offer them to your queen. Make sure to leave some pupae in your host worker’s setup, they may come in handy later.

 

4A. Most parasitic Formica can open pupae. If your queen manages to open the pupae before they start to die, you won’t be needing your host workers anymore; all you need is more pupae! I would offer the pupae into your parasitic queen’s setup gradually, as if you offer all 10-50 at once, your colony will be overwhelmed and some pupae will die.

 

4B. If your queen is unable to open pupae and the pupae die, your queen will need the host workers. The reason I suggested you collect the host workers before you necessarily need them is because the longer those workers are separated from their real queen and colony, the more their scent fades. Ants rely on scent to determine whether or not other ants are apart of their colony, so if your host workers have been separated for 2+ weeks from their colony they have a higher chance of accepting and joining forces with the parasitic queen.

When introducing host workers to parasitic queens, I like to use the callow method. The reason I told you to leave some pupae in your host worker’s setup earlier is so you could use them as host workers now. As the pupae start to get older, the host workers will open the cocoons and new workers will be born. Freshly born ants are called callows. Callows haven’t been fully alive long enough to truly inherit the now fading host colonies' scent, making them an even better option for host workers. If you don't know what callows look like, try to find a worker in the setup that is slow moving and quite pale. She is probably a callow. Before you introduce the callows to your queen, make sure you follow these short steps:

 

After removing the dead/decaying pupae out of your parasitic queen’s setup, feed your queen some honey or your preferred carbohydrate. This way, she will have enough energy for when the host workers are introduced and she won’t be hungry, (which also means there will be a lower chance of her killing the host workers for food).

 

Finally, collect around four callows and introduce them to your queen. Monitoring their interactions at this stage is very crucial. Since the workers are callows, I don’t think you should be really worried about the queen getting killed, I would be more worried about the latter. The reason I suggested only introducing 4-7 of them at first is for your queen's safety as well. As a general rule, ants in a group are more likely to attack something then if they are alone. If all goes as planned, the queen will accept the host workers and you will have yourself a parasitic colony! If she has accepted the host workers, you can gradually add in more and more pupae so your host workforce will grow.

 

(Crucial hint for your queen's success: make sure you feed her sugars and meat throughout all of these stages. Parasitic queens are not fully claustral. They will die if you do not feed them)

 

 

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Formica cf. fossaceps queen with dying pupae

 

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Formica pratensis Queen with Host Workers, By Lusatica

 

Presuming that one of these methods worked and your parasitic queen has meshed with the host workers, now all you have to do is wait until your queen lays eggs and eventually gets her first generation of offspring. Keep in mind, parasitic Formica queens generally start laying eggs after their first hibernation. (If your queen doesn’t lay eggs right away it doesn’t necessarily mean she’s infertile, she could very well just be waiting for hibernation). Treat your parasitic colony like a normal colony in the time before your parasitic queen’s offspring arrives, and after they do too. Feed them like you would a normal colony, (but maybe with a little more care). Once you get a substantial parasitic workforce, you could even consider moving the colony into a naturalistic setup. If you offer the materials that the species you are keeping makes their mounds out of in the wild, you could possibly see them create a big mound like they would in the wild!

 

Also, keep in mind parasitic Formica spp. have an important relationship with their habitat and survival rates. Because of this, I would recommend raising them in a naturalistic setup. (Credit to AAU for that information)

 

For those of you who sadly did not succeed in getting your parasitic queen past the founding stages, I send my condolences. Sometimes, despite everything you do and try, things still don’t go as planned. If your queen has died, then there isn’t really anything you can do at this point besides go and try to find another. If she is still alive but her host workers are dead, you could try to repeat the process. On the second go, I would try to get a different host species if you weren’t 100% sure on the exact ID of your queen. Possibly, you just got the wrong host species. 

 

 

Slave Raiders:

 

 

(Raptiformica) Formica sanguinea Group
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Formica cf. subintegra Queen with Formica fusca Host Workers, By Antshaman

 

Keys Including this Group:

 

N/A

 

North American Species Include:

 

Formica aserva, Formica creightoni, Formica curiosa, Formica gynocrates, Formica sanguinea subnuda, Formica subintegra, Formica obtusopilosa, Formica pergandei, Formica puberula, Formica rubicunda, and Formica wheeleri.

 

Eurasian Species Include:

 

Formica sanguinea.

 

Hosts: Preferably Serviformica or a Formica fusca group species, but they are known to enslave Lasius spp., Myrmicinae spp., and even other parasitic Formica spp.

 

Distinguishing Characteristics of this Group/Biology:

 

The Formica sanguinea group is the only slave raiding group of Formica. Member species of the group are spread throughout the U.S. and Canada, and Formica sanguinea has large populations throughout Europe. Slave raiding workers and queens can be identified from other Formica spp. through the dense pubescence on the gaster and their large, sickle looking jaw frame. Slave raiders are usually quite larger then other Formica spp. in size, too.

 

Formica sanguinea group slave raiders generally sit inside their nest all day, every day; except for when they go on slave raids. They do not forage themselves. The slaves do everything from raising brood, foraging for food, taking care of the nest, etc. All the slave raiders do is slave raid, hence the name. Raiding behaviour usually involves a scout finding a host colony who then comes back to the nest and gathers a raiding party, and the raiding party goes out and breaks into the nest, and finally, they steal callows and brood who will serve as future slaves.

Colony founding for slave raiders is much the same as parasitic colonies: dealate queens seek out host colonies, kill the host queen, and then using the remaining host worker force to raise her brood. Although, slave raiding Formica queens are known to single handily raid host colonies, take their brood, and stash it inside a burrow. Later, they will open the pupae they have stole from the host colony and let the newborn slaves take care of their brood. Other parasitic Formica queens are known to do this, but not as frequently as slave raiding Formica queens.

 

 

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Formica subintegra Workers With Pupae, By Alex Wild

 

Raising Slave Raiding Formica:

 

Now many people, myself included, believe keeping slave-raiding ants in captivity is a waste of time and cruel. The reason being, in the wild, all slave raiders do is slave raid and sit around in their nest. To keep a healthy Raptiformica colony going you would need a lot of disposable host colonies or brood for the colony to raid, which in itself is quite hard to obtain. Over the years, people have experimented with raising slave raiders for hobbyistic purposes, and in almost all cases the colonies didn’t survive for very long.

 

Nevertheless, I will provide a tutorial here on how one could theoretically raise one:

 

Step 1. Scroll back on this thread and read my method on how to get a parasitic Formica colony up and running. (You will need to use the same method for getting a slave raiding colony through the founding stages). Although, Raptiformica queens usually do a better job opening pupae then other parasitic Formica species.

 

Step 2. Raise the colony like you would a normal one. Feed them like you would a normal colony. The only extra thing you have to do for a slave raiding colony (past the founding stages), is to simulate slave raids.

 

Step 3. Simulate slave raids. (Once you get your colony past the founding stage and you have your first generation of slave raiding workers, you will need to start to simulate slave raids). Now there are different ways to do this, but at the core, you must provide pupae and brood for the colony to steal. You can do this by attaching a host colony up to the slave raiding colony’s setup, or by dumping pupae into your colonies outworld, but at the core, all you have to do is provide pupae so the colony can acquire more and more slaves. If you fail to do this, the colony will slowly die out. Like I said before, the only purpose of slave raiders is to slave raid.

 

(Note: Formica aserva and Formica sanguinea do not necessarily need slaves to survive. They can do quite fine without them)

 

And.. that’s basically it! Taking care of slave raiders is basically the same as any other species past the founding stages, you just have to provide them with colonies to raid from.

 

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Formica obscuriventris Alates, By Carol Davis

 

Thank you for reading this gigantic thread! Hopefully, this information can help more people successfully raise parasitic (and maybe even slave raiding.. ) colonies!

 

Big thanks to Anthony, Aaron, and all the other members of the community who helped me put together this thread. Overall, I had a lot of fun researching!

 

Resources

 

Oh, and if any of you guys have any questions that I may have not answered in this thread, feel free to leave them in a post below and I'll try to help you out! :)


Edited by AntsBC, July 4 2019 - 8:25 PM.

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#2 Offline Macro_Ants - Posted March 25 2019 - 12:27 PM

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Very useful, thanks for the post!
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#3 Offline Guy_Fieri - Posted March 25 2019 - 8:16 PM

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If I'm lucky this thread will come in handy soon. Thanks for covering everything in this one tutorial.



#4 Offline nurbs - Posted March 26 2019 - 1:12 AM

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I was successful with a Formica aserva about 5 years ago. Colony was doing great and the queen had her own native workers, but I accidentally killed them by feeding them an apple with pesticides on them.

 

I even got her to accept Lasius brood.

 

 

 

 


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#5 Offline Serafine - Posted March 26 2019 - 2:38 AM

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It should be mentioned that the entire parasitic Formica sensu strictu group (all Formica that are not non-parasitic Serviformica and slave-keeping Raptiformica sanguinea) is under special protection in many european countries (at least in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and France, potentially more) due to their enormous ecological importance. This means that in those countries you are not allowed to catch, raise, keep, buy, sell them or disturb/damage/remove their nests (they need to be resettled by experts if there's no way they can stay where they are).

 

Also Formica sanguinea does not need slaves. They are social parasites which means they need a host colony for founding but beyond the founding stage they will do just fine without slaves, sometimes even better than if they had them. There's quite a few german journals proving that.

The only european ant that cannot exist without slaves is Polyergus sp (the amazon ant) and maybe some of the Temnothorax slavekeepers (I'm not familiar with those though).


Edited by Serafine, March 26 2019 - 2:45 AM.

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#6 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted March 26 2019 - 10:22 AM

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It should be mentioned that the entire parasitic Formica sensu strictu group (all Formica that are not non-parasitic Serviformica and slave-keeping Raptiformica sanguinea) is under special protection in many european countries (at least in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and France, potentially more) due to their enormous ecological importance. This means that in those countries you are not allowed to catch, raise, keep, buy, sell them or disturb/damage/remove their nests (they need to be resettled by experts if there's no way they can stay where they are).

 

Also Formica sanguinea does not need slaves. They are social parasites which means they need a host colony for founding but beyond the founding stage they will do just fine without slaves, sometimes even better than if they had them. There's quite a few german journals proving that.

The only european ant that cannot exist without slaves is Polyergus sp (the amazon ant) and maybe some of the Temnothorax slavekeepers (I'm not familiar with those though).

Could we see the german jourrnals that prove this? I would think that because of their raids on other species and just the concept of how slaves work in colonies, they'd be beneficial. The only cases of these slave workers being harmful that I could think of is transmission of parasites or diseases as well as being in an area with a lack of food. Not only would slaves help search for food and perform regular nest duties, but they're also sometimes used as food for the young. I would think they'd do fine without slaves, but would overall benefit from them. 


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#7 Offline Jamiesname - Posted May 21 2019 - 7:34 PM

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Can anyone tell from these pics if this is a slave raiding or parasitic Formica queen. I found her in a log in Northeastern Michigan with black Formica host/slave workers. The pic of her worker's mandibles appear to be suited for raiding pupae, but I'm not sure. She must have lost 2 of her legs during the initial invasion, but it doesn't seem to slow her down. She's an egg laying machine!




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#8 Offline Leo - Posted May 22 2019 - 2:34 AM

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Can anyone tell from these pics if this is a slave raiding or parasitic Formica queen. I found her in a log in Northeastern Michigan with black Formica host/slave workers. The pic of her worker's mandibles appear to be suited for raiding pupae, but I'm not sure. She must have lost 2 of her legs during the initial invasion, but it doesn't seem to slow her down. She's an egg laying machine!












 

pretty sure she's polygerus (slave raiders)


Edited by Leo, May 22 2019 - 2:34 AM.

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#9 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted May 22 2019 - 5:42 AM

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that is Polyergus.
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#10 Offline AntsBC - Posted May 22 2019 - 7:29 AM

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AntDude and Leo are correct, she is indeed Polyergus: Polyergus bicolor to be exact. She's a slave raider, too.

 

In the wild, Polyergus bicolor only slave raid and sit inside the nest. The slaves do all the nest maintenance, brood raising, foraging, etc. It's up to you if you think you would be able to constantly supply this colony with slaves and brood, but I would advise against keeping them. In captivity, slave raiders generally don't make it past their third generation of workers. 

 

If you do want to keep them though, they will need a constant supply of Serviformica brood, preferably those of the F. fusca group. According to AntWiki, their ideal slaves are F. subaenescens or F. neorufibarbis, (Formica subaenescens is the same Formica species as your current host workers).

 

Good luck! 


Edited by AntsBC, May 22 2019 - 7:59 AM.

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#11 Offline Acutus - Posted May 22 2019 - 11:09 AM

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Very nice been trying to find the time to read it! Thanks for all the work!! :D


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