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Make Your Own Viewing Test Tube Setup


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15 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Xanuri - Posted January 30 2019 - 12:33 PM

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Equipment:

 

Instructions:

  1. measure out the circumference of the test tube, I did this by wrapping it in paper and marking where they connect
  2. measure your viewing area, I would recommend making it longer on both ends to support more or less water.
  3. Cut the vinyl to your measured dimensions
  4. make sure the test tube is clean and dry
  5. pull the adhesive cover off and affix to the test tube
  6. slowly roll the vinyl onto the test tube make sure to do this slowly press and roll to eliminate bubbles

 

When you are done, it might looks something like this. In this case I used a AC Test Tube as I like the adapters and tubing connection options, should you need to provide food or water later on

 

Picture of the Test Tube after being wrapped in red vinyl

 

Picture of Ant in the test tube (base Google Pixel 3 camera (no macro lens))

 

 


Current Ants:

C. fragilis

S. xyloni


#2 Offline Shifty189 - Posted January 30 2019 - 4:32 PM

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nice, write up, thanks for this.

 

On a slightly different note, I haven't tried this myself because I'm skeptical that blocking all blue light is all that's needed to "trick" them into thinking they are in the dark. Do you (or anyone else for that matter) have any input on this?



#3 Offline Xanuri - Posted January 30 2019 - 6:37 PM

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nice, write up, thanks for this.

 

On a slightly different note, I haven't tried this myself because I'm skeptical that blocking all blue light is all that's needed to "trick" them into thinking they are in the dark. Do you (or anyone else for that matter) have any input on this?

 

It was my understanding that ants cannot see red light, so if you put a filter like I did on this test tube, they "think they are in the dark"!

 

This would allow you to observe them, say a founding queen...while in her test tube setup, without "turning on the lights" to see her! That was kind of the reason I tried this.


Current Ants:

C. fragilis

S. xyloni


#4 Offline Shifty189 - Posted February 1 2019 - 7:37 AM

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I have heard the same thing, but that's exactly what I'm skeptical about. Have you noticed a difference in how they act with the film on and when the film was off?



#5 Offline FSTP - Posted February 1 2019 - 8:23 AM

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I have a red LED light that I use to inspect my ants. When I shine it on them they don't react at all. However if I take a normal LED flashlight and shine it on them. They go crazy and start running all over the place.


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There are videos of my ants here: https://www.youtube....bN5yYK2KWXA0vQ?


#6 Offline Xanuri - Posted February 1 2019 - 12:48 PM

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I have heard the same thing, but that's exactly what I'm skeptical about. Have you noticed a difference in how they act with the film on and when the film was off?

 

yes, so far they "seem" to be calmer under the film while uncovered, they don't move or look around or act like "they were just caught with their pants down"! which happened nearly every time I lifted the towel I had on them to cover them up, my room is lit with softer light and they still reacted as if "discovered" when I took it off, now they give no reaction to being uncovered.

 

It could be a simple fact of diffused light, since white light is much "brighter" and mimic's sunlight exposure" after all ants live in darkness, right!

 

it might be possible to achieve the same thing with other color film, I would assume shadowing would still occur and they likely may interpret that as movement, since that is what their eyes are good at spotting. Might be interesting to try some shade of gray, since that may mimic "darkness" a bit more realistically, something like Matte Black or Smoke Black, which the vinyl I linked does come in those shades.


Edited by Xanuri, February 1 2019 - 12:58 PM.

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Current Ants:

C. fragilis

S. xyloni


#7 Offline Leo - Posted February 1 2019 - 6:02 PM

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It could be a simple fact of diffused light, since white light is much "brighter" and mimic's sunlight exposure" after all ants live in darkness, right!

 

 

 

not exactly =P. Weavers don't.



#8 Offline Antking117 - Posted February 1 2019 - 7:57 PM

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I have a red LED light that I use to inspect my ants. When I shine it on them they don't react at all. However if I take a normal LED flashlight and shine it on them. They go crazy and start running all over the place.

It could be they are just used to the red LED instead of the normal LED. I use all sorts of lights to view my ants and sure they cared at first but never react anymore. Only movement makes my current ants react.



#9 Offline Wa.Va - Posted February 2 2019 - 5:26 AM

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I do know not all ants can't see red. It will work with most spp. But not all

#10 Offline DJoseph98 - Posted February 2 2019 - 12:06 PM

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I imagine most ant species wouldn’t be bothered by red light unless they have especially good vision. I know that most bats will freak out when you shine a normal light on them but remain undisturbed when it’s red (many trips to caves where they stressed the importance of this). This would be a good research project, using both species with underdeveloped vision and those with greater visual aquity. Try and observe success of the colony over time vs a control group. Differences in brood size, queen founding success rates, and overall colony health and activity, etc.
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#11 Offline Wa.Va - Posted February 2 2019 - 12:51 PM

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I imagine most ant species wouldn’t be bothered by red light unless they have especially good vision. I know that most bats will freak out when you shine a normal light on them but remain undisturbed when it’s red (many trips to caves where they stressed the importance of this). This would be a good research project, using both species with underdeveloped vision and those with greater visual aquity. Try and observe success of the colony over time vs a control group. Differences in brood size, queen founding success rates, and overall colony health and activity, etc.


I think u will need loads and loads of colonies. Just to have a bit of an answer

#12 Offline DJoseph98 - Posted February 2 2019 - 2:59 PM

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I imagine most ant species wouldn’t be bothered by red light unless they have especially good vision. I know that most bats will freak out when you shine a normal light on them but remain undisturbed when it’s red (many trips to caves where they stressed the importance of this). This would be a good research project, using both species with underdeveloped vision and those with greater visual aquity. Try and observe success of the colony over time vs a control group. Differences in brood size, queen founding success rates, and overall colony health and activity, etc.


I think u will need loads and loads of colonies. Just to have a bit of an answer

 

You're probably right, though someone will probably get it done eventually (imagine ant entire lab full of founding setups !). It would be a lot of work, but I think it would be worthwhile and provide useful knowledge for the community. 


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#13 Offline Shifty189 - Posted February 4 2019 - 2:29 PM

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we are coming into season now in south Florida, so I can probably grab as many RIFA queens as I want. since I have about 200 test tubes, I should be able to do this test with little effort. I'll see if I can pick up some red film and test this. If I do, I'll start a new post for posting my data.


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#14 Offline CoolColJ - Posted February 10 2019 - 8:06 PM

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Ants notice difference in light intensity regardless of colours.

I have red film over my ants setups in my incubator and when I open the lid they react, so they can see it.

 

But they are also calmed by red film compared to being naked.

And then eventually naked light does not bother them if it's not too bright.

 

I think it's all about relative brightness, rather than the light itself.

They don't see light as absolute values like we do.

 

It's all about them feeling safe and secure

 

My termites seem to be calmed by red flim...


  • Shifty189 and ANTdrew like this
Current ant colonies -
1) Opisthopsis Rufithorax (strobe ant), Melophorus sp2. black and orange
Pheidole antipodum colonies...  Polyrhachis rufifemur, Camponotus suffusus bendingesis, Camponotus nigriceps, Myrmecia fulvipes, Colobopsis macrocephala
Journal = http://www.formicult...ra-iridomyrmex/

Heterotermes cf brevicatena termite pet/feeder journal = http://www.formicult...feeder-journal/

#15 Offline Joehostile85 - Posted February 28 2019 - 6:01 AM

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This all comes from research that suggests insects can’t see the COLOR red. Then ant shops or enthusiasts confused color with light. Being color blind has nothing to do with not being able to see light.

I could go on and on about color and light, but to prove this is just a myth is simple because most ants have ocile organs(eyes) and their function is to sense changes in light. These “eyes” do not see images or color at all. If you could blindfold ants and shine a light in them they would still react to the light because their ocile eyes will detect it.

The film does serve a purpose because it dims the light therefore making the ants more comfortable. However any colour that is dark enough to dim the light would have the exact same affect.

#16 Offline Xanuri - Posted February 28 2019 - 10:20 AM

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My whole intent was to provide a way to view without the drastic transition from darkness to light, RED in my opinion is easiest for US to see through for detail and still provide a less shocking transition. BLUE would likely provide even less of a shock but it would be more difficult to observe through. If observation is not required then throw some limo tint on it and call it a day, at least if you do move it into light it would greatly reduce the intensity of it!


Current Ants:

C. fragilis

S. xyloni





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