Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  



Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use, and contain no ads for members. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo
- - - - -

where do they go?

nuptial flight

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Offline smares - Posted January 17 2019 - 8:18 PM

smares

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 91 posts
  • LocationLakewood, Colorado

So I can figure out when some colonies of ants have a nuptial flight by watching their nest. The problem is I don't know where they are flying to! Honestly I can't even tell what direction they are flying.  Any tips?



#2 Online Mdrogun - Posted January 17 2019 - 8:44 PM

Mdrogun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 783 posts
  • LocationNaperville, IL

you won't be able to track creatures the size of a small screw as they fly up into the sky. Just walk around in the area you see ants flying, and keep your eyes on the ground.


Ready for Nuptial flights!


#3 Offline YsTheAnt - Posted January 17 2019 - 8:57 PM

YsTheAnt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,166 posts
  • LocationSan Jose, CA
Depends on the species. Camponotus for example will oftentimes fly onto logs or trees. Prenolepis on the other hand will usually fly to a mating lek with hundreds of other reproductives to mate, these areas tend to be around forest edges.

#4 Offline Guy_Fieri - Posted January 17 2019 - 9:25 PM

Guy_Fieri

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 82 posts
  • LocationOrange County

There really isn't any specific place the alates fly to. The female alates will land once they have mated and gotten far enough away from their home colony. You could try looking for queens on the ground, under stones, in rotting wood, or in founding chambers.



#5 Offline Shifty189 - Posted January 18 2019 - 11:57 AM

Shifty189

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 168 posts
  • LocationSouth Florida

Best tip that i have heard (but won't directly answer your question) is to get a few decent sized rocks and place them in the area on sand or dirt. keep this area watered to help them dig, and the day after you think a flight happened turn over the rocks. More often than you think you will find a queen trying to found a colony.

 

this is commonly called a queen ant trap.


  • Ant_Dude2908, smares and AntsBC like this

#6 Offline smares - Posted January 18 2019 - 1:49 PM

smares

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 91 posts
  • LocationLakewood, Colorado

Shifty189 that is a great idea, I will try that!



#7 Offline ANTdrew - Posted January 19 2019 - 7:46 AM

ANTdrew

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,255 posts
  • LocationAlexandria, VA
The other tip is to have little vials in your pocket at all times in the warmer months. Just keep your eyes on the ground and investigate any large or unusual ant you see. Birders talk about the “jizz” of a bird, which is its usual movement and look. It’s an applicable concept to anting too because if you get to know the usual jizz of ants in your area, you’ll be able to spot queens right away since they are totally different. In the end, it comes down to luck and persistence.

"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25


#8 Offline nurbs - Posted January 21 2019 - 7:11 PM

nurbs

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,380 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles

You won't need to know their "heading". If you find one nest in an area, there are bound to be several hundred more of the same species scattered about. If you catch them at the right time during their flights, they should be easy to spot and find.

 

It also depends on what species you are looking for. For example, C. laevigatus will always land on rotten or fallen pine, Myrmecocystus in the deserts will always make founding chambers, C. vicinus and C. modoc are almost always random - trees, ground, rocks, etc.


  • Ant_Dude2908 likes this

Instagram:

nurbsants

 

YouTube

 

California Ants for Sale

 

Camponotus us-ca02

http://www.formicult...onotus-us-ca02/

 

Pencil Case and Test Tube Formicariums

http://www.formicult...m-and-outworld/

 

Bloodworm Soup

http://www.formicult...bloodworm-soup/






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nuptial flight

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users