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Poor Poor Lonely George


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Offline FSTP - Posted January 8 2019 - 8:15 PM

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I feel soo bad for George. He had no chance in this cruel cruel world.

 

https://www.national...aii-extinction/


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#2 Offline Vendayn - Posted January 8 2019 - 8:21 PM

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Well, its sad. But as far as I know nothing naturally evolved on hawaii and it was all imported species. Maybe there are native birds that naturally flew there. So anything that didn't naturally arrive in hawaii is an invasive species, and no different than solenopsis invicta or other invasive ants or anything invasive anywhere else. Unless Solenopsis invicta can be considered native after being in areas after 100s or 1000s of years, then it be no different in anything else in hawaii. The less invasive and non-native species, the better as far as I understand people's stance on invasive/non-native species.


Edited by Vendayn, January 8 2019 - 8:22 PM.


#3 Offline FSTP - Posted January 8 2019 - 8:28 PM

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He (though they do have bothe sex organs) was a native species that's why they were trying to save him.


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#4 Offline gcsnelling - Posted January 9 2019 - 3:28 AM

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Did you actually read and comprehend the article Vendayn?



#5 Offline Reacker - Posted January 10 2019 - 5:08 PM

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Why read the article when you can just post a reactionary opinion unshaped by fact?


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#6 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted January 10 2019 - 8:47 PM

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Awe man, I didn't know he died.. That's really sad tbh. I remember when I used to live in Hawaii I would always wish tree snails would rebound in population, but seems like they may not come back from the brink :(


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#7 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted January 10 2019 - 8:51 PM

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Well, its sad. But as far as I know nothing naturally evolved on hawaii and it was all imported species. Maybe there are native birds that naturally flew there. So anything that didn't naturally arrive in hawaii is an invasive species, and no different than solenopsis invicta or other invasive ants or anything invasive anywhere else. Unless Solenopsis invicta can be considered native after being in areas after 100s or 1000s of years, then it be no different in anything else in hawaii. The less invasive and non-native species, the better as far as I understand people's stance on invasive/non-native species.

These snails were descended from an initial population of mainland Asian (I believe) tree snails, probably swept overseas on a tree or on driftwood. They then proceeded to evolve independently on this barren rock in the middle of the Pacific, eventually becoming an entirely new species as the rock's plant life grew denser. If I remember correctly, Hawaiian Tree Snails were probably present on the Hawaiian Islands before any endemic birds. If you do a little bit of research on Hawaii's natural history, you would find out that Hawaii hosted an incredible amount of endemic species, from the flightless moa-nalo to the tiny happy faced spider. Unfortunately, most of these animals are now extinct.

 

According to your statement, kangaroos would be invasive in Australia and lemurs would be invasive in Madagascar.


Edited by Connectimyrmex, January 10 2019 - 8:52 PM.

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Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps




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