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Will230145's Camponotus Novaeboracensis Journal! (Discontinued for now)


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16 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Will230145 - Posted December 16 2018 - 6:35 PM

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I caught a queen of this species a while back but didn't make a journal as I thought she wasn't going to make it. She ended up laying a huge brood pile and having 3 workers before fall. She was not off to a great start and did not start laying until august. She is in hibernation right now but I will update you in march! :D

Edited by Will230145, January 5 2019 - 8:27 PM.

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#2 Offline kingz2015 - Posted December 19 2018 - 6:52 AM

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That's really awesome, where did you catch her? I've been looking for one myself.

#3 Offline Will230145 - Posted December 19 2018 - 2:35 PM

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That's really awesome, where did you catch her? I've been looking for one myself.


Around May or June

#4 Offline kingz2015 - Posted December 22 2018 - 8:10 PM

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Are you located in New York? And do you remember where?

#5 Offline Will230145 - Posted December 23 2018 - 8:42 PM

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Are you located in New York? And do you remember where?


No, I’m in PA but all I know is that they are everywhere pretty much. Just look for parks or country areas!

#6 Offline kingz2015 - Posted December 27 2018 - 5:20 PM

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I have and I can't find any :-(. I did find a few camponotus Pennsylvanicus colonies but no novaeborancensis
Is there a specific wood they prefer to be in?

#7 Offline Will230145 - Posted December 27 2018 - 8:04 PM

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I have and I can't find any :-(. I did find a few camponotus Pennsylvanicus colonies but no novaeborancensisIs there a specific wood they prefer to be in?

I’m not sure all i know is nuptial flights are from April to August

All rights to Ants Canada 2019 Ant keeping book: Common name(s): Red Carpenter Ants, New York Carpenter Ants Difficulty Level: Easy
Queen: Claustral. Monogynous.
Habitat: Nests in and around dead wood

Ideal nest moisture level: 10-30% moist

Diet: insectivorous, honey water/sugar water
Nest Temperature: 23-27 degrees C
Outworld Temperature: 20-30 degrees C

Notes: These ants will benefit from a heated nest. Heating is not necessary but without it, one can expect the colony development to be slow.
These ants will readily accept crickets and mealworms.

Edited by Will230145, December 27 2018 - 8:05 PM.


#8 Offline kingz2015 - Posted December 30 2018 - 6:21 PM

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Thank you

#9 Offline Will230145 - Posted December 31 2018 - 6:45 AM

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Thank you


Yeah, we antkeepers help each other out!

#10 Offline Will230145 - Posted December 31 2018 - 12:06 PM

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So it turns out that I started their hibernation in September do to me not knowing anything (about hibernation) at the time, so I was going to keep them in but their food stores (in gaster) were running low, so I took them out. The queen has 2 workers and a few larvae!

#11 Offline Will230145 - Posted December 31 2018 - 12:15 PM

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F41NJqp.jpg


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#12 Offline Will230145 - Posted January 5 2019 - 8:29 PM

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So long story short, this colony’s mini hearth flooded (no idea why) and I rushed them into a blocked off Omni nest. They ate a cricket layed a new batch of eggs and was doing great! Had 2 workers, but one died from age. I woke up to find the queen dead and curled up and the one worker is still caring for the brood, what should I do?

I will start back on this journal if I find another queen/colony.

#13 Offline kingz2015 - Posted January 6 2019 - 2:41 AM

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Dang that sucks but I know the feeling. You should retract your steps and experiment with the mine hearth to see how that could've happened. Then you should probably try to find a new queen/colony as fast as possible and have the new queen adopt the brood you already have.

#14 Offline Will230145 - Posted January 6 2019 - 8:23 AM

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Ok, I just don’t know how to get a queen in winter :lol:

#15 Offline Manitobant - Posted January 7 2019 - 7:56 AM

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Ok, I just don’t know how to get a queen in winter :lol:

you can look under stones or in rotting logs but it might be hard.

#16 Offline kingz2015 - Posted January 7 2019 - 12:37 PM

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Yeah, you can look the same places you normally would since they're in hibernation. It just would be harder because some may be deep in the logs, dirt, or just dead from an unsuccessful breeding spot.

#17 Offline Will230145 - Posted January 7 2019 - 7:43 PM

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Ok, I’ll try thanks!




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